BT HANDBOOK

Digital Video 101

A play-by-play guide to making movies you'll actually want to watch when you get home.

Clockwise, from left: Kodak Zi8, Sony's Bloggie MHS-CM5, Flip Ultra, Vado HD (3rd Gen), Easy Shot Clip

CHOOSE IT
Five foolproof, USB-enabled video cameras for $200 or less.

TOP VALUE
Not only is the 2 ½-inch LCD screen on the Kodak Zi8 20 percent larger than that of comparable cameras, the smartphone-size unit comes packed with crowd-pleasing features like face detection for filming in a group and razor-sharp HD—at a price significantly less than its competition. kodak.com, $180.

SMALL WONDER
Slightly larger than a tube of ChapStick (and almost as light), the Easy Shot Clip is the minimalist's preferred device. Attach it to a belt buckle or a bike helmet, and you'll have hands-free coverage of any adventure. The trade-off? A gadget this tiny has no room for a screen. concordkeystone.com, $70.

WORTHY UPGRADE
At four inches tall and less than two inches thick, Sony's Bloggie MHS-CM5 is one of the smallest cameras at this price to feature a hinged screen—easier to use and normally reserved for cams twice the cost—and a 5x optical zoom, which makes zeroing in on those once-in-a-lifetime clips a breeze. sonystyle.com, $200.

THE ORIGINAL
Flip Video basically invented the under-$200 video camera, and of the five versions now offered, the original Ultra is still our favorite, thanks to its low price, intuitive controls, and easy uploading. theflip.com, from $150.

THE PROFESSIONAL
Creative made its name in stereo speakers, so it's no surprise that the company's Vado HD (3rd Gen) records crystal-clear audio. Add to that low-light sensitivity, crisp HD, and four gigs of internal memory, and you've got a power-packed machine—just about the size of a deck of cards. us.store.creative.com, $180.

Keep It Short Of the most popular YouTube videos, 52 percent are between 3 and 5 minutes long, while the top eight viral videos highlighted on advice site webvideovirtuoso.com averaged 3 minutes and 55 seconds.

SHOOT IT
Expert tips to keep you aiming straight.

TELL A STORY
Every video should have a narrative arc, says Eric Lange, a director of photography for Discovery Channel's Deadliest Catch. For example, if you're taking a road trip, record your packing and prep, hijinks on the road, and, finally, a recap of the journey.

TIME IT RIGHT
According to Kevin Flay, a wildlife cameraman for BBC's Life series, prime filming times are right after sunrise and two hours before sunset. The light is perfect, the animals are out, and your kids are probably raring to go, anyway.

CONDUCT INTERVIEWS
A golden rule: Cameramen should not be narrators. Instead, recruit your travel companions to be video personalities, says Lange. Let them talk you through the sundae bar on your Caribbean cruise or the taxi ride through Times Square.

USE ZOOM
Boring footage is often a problem of perspective. Instead of remaining at a fixed focal length, Lange recommends that you practice zooming in from a wide angle to a close-up, or zooming out from a detail shot to the full scene.

ACT AS A TRIPOD
No matter how great the footage, camera shake is a deal breaker. To reduce wobble, keep your knees loose and your feet—and camera angle—wide. If you're filming one-handed, Lange suggests bracing your other arm across your chest for stability.

BE PATIENT!
Great shots take time. Flay spent two weeks observing Komodo dragons in the wild before capturing the animal attacking its prey; you can wait two minutes to line up a stunning clip of your Costa Rican jungle trek.

Ride the Wave According to a recent study, the best time to upload on YouTube is between 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. midweek—so your videos can be ready and waiting when lunchtime traffic hits its peak.

CUT IT
Have hours of footage? Time to get ruthless.

GET WITH THE (RIGHT) PROGRAM
Editing software has never been more user-friendly, but two programs rise above the rest: iMovie '09 for Macs (apple.com, free as part of iLife '09, $79 separately) and Avid's Pinnacle Studio HD for PCs (shop.avid.com, $50). Both make cutting segments simple, and they also have one-click features, including an image stabilizer that gives you the steady hand you wish you'd had.

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Note:This story was accurate when it was published. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.
 

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