SEEING IS BELIEVING

World's Weirdest Restaurants

By , Monday, May 17, 2010, 6:02 PM

Source Article: World's Weirdest Restaurants

Patrons of the underwater restaurant Ithaa can dine on seafood—including the very black cod, legend fish, and rainbow runner swimming above them. (Conrad Maldives/courtesy Hilton World Resorts)

If you think a restaurant 16 feet below sea level would be dark and murky, think again. Ithaa sits below the sparkling surface of the Indian Ocean, but it can get bright enough inside for guests to need sunglasses. (Daniel Laskowski/courtesy Hilton World Resorts)

The coolest restaurant ever is Finland's SnowRestaurant, part of the world's largest ice castle. It has an ethereal blue glow. (John Arnold/courtesy SnowCastle)

Bundle up before eating at SnowRestaurant, sculpted entirely of ice. Not surprisingly, the inside temperature is almost always below zero degrees Celsius. (Sabita Rao/courtesy SnowCastle)

At SnowRestaurant, grab yourself a reindeer-fur-covered seat at a long table and chat with the other guests. Talking about the decor is a great icebreaker. (Sabita Rao/courtesy SnowCastle)

Taiwan's Modern Toilet started out as one location serving food in dishes shaped like toilets. Now it's a full-service chain, proving that it's no "flush-in-the pan" concept. (Courtesy Modern Toilet)

At Modern Toilet, guests sit on (replica) toilets and eat out of dishes shaped like sinks and bathtubs. Be sure to buy a urinal-shaped bottle of water as a souvenir. (Courtesy Modern Toilet)

Modern Toilet has combined the kitchen and the bathroom—the two rooms in the house that should have as little to do with each other as possible—into a popular theme-restaurant franchise. (Courtesy Modern Toilet)

If you can stomach soft-serve chocolate ice cream brought to your table in a miniature toilet bowl, Modern Toilet is the place for you. (Tracy & Naoki Ogishi/courtesy Modern Toilet)

Looking to take your food to new heights? Try 164 feet in midair. Dinner in the Sky hosts parties of up to 22 people on a 30-foot-by-16-foot platform hoisted by a crane. (Courtesy Dinner in the Sky)

Dinner in the Sky guests are attached to their chairs with harness-like seat belts. Servers move about in the center of the platform. (Courtesy Dinner in the Sky)

In a sign that the craze for theme restaurants is running out of ideas, there's now a Jesus-themed restaurant chain in Tokyo. It's called Christon Cafe. (Laszlo Thoth/courtesy Christon Cafe)

At Christon Cafe the eight locations are designed to look like churches, with details like vaulted ceilings and stained-glass windows. (Laszlo Thoth/courtesy Christon Cafe)

You probably don't have "jail" on your list of places to visit in Italy, but you might want to make an exception for Fortezza Medicea. The maximum-security prison near Pisa runs a restaurant staffed by inmates. (Alessandra Latini/courtesy Fortezza Medicea)

Despite the fortresslike exterior—and the armed security guards lining the place—Fortezza Medicea's restaurant feels surprisingly normal. It's easy to forget that the guy refilling your wineglass is doing life for murder. (Bruce Allen/courtesy Fortezza Medicea)

Hospitals aren't known for tasty food, but that didn't stop designers from going with a medical theme when they created The Clinic, in downtown Singapore. It has pill-shaped lounges and a dance floor called Morphine. (Courtesy The Clinic Restaurant)

The Clinic is decorated with drips, wheelchairs, and operating tables. The waitstaff, dressed in hospital whites, serves food in stainless-steel, kidney-shaped dishes. (Rita Schoeppe Syfert/courtesy The Clinic Restaurant)

While you're on the way to your table at Ninja New York, hidden ninjas may drop down from the ceiling at any moment and let fly with martial-arts action. (Jeffrey & Rachel Vanneste/courtesy Ninja New York)

Ninja New York, as the name suggests, is a restaurant where sword-carrying waiters in black costumes greet you at the door. (Jeffrey & Rachel Vanneste/courtesy Ninja New York)

The Ninja New York menu, written on a scroll, primarily consists of Japanese-fusion twists on global favorites like foie gras and marinated monkfish. (Jeffrey & Rachel Vanneste/courtesy Ninja New York)

Dry ice is used for dramatic effect in meals at Ninja New York. But don't scrimp on the tip—ninjas are notorious for seeking revenge. (Jeffrey & Rachel Vanneste/courtesy Ninja New York)