Adorable Babies at the Philadelphia Zoo

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— Courtesy Philadelphia Zoo/Michael Mercadante
Spud, a fuzzy, charcoal-gray Humboldt penguin, is already a crowd-pleaser

A fuzzy Humboldt penguin named Spud, a Bolivian titi monkey, and a giant river otter pup are a few of Philly's cuties. As these fun facts and photos prove, baby animals are (almost) just like us!

Fairmount Park, 3400 W. Girard Ave., Philadelphia, Pa., 215/243-1100, philadelphiazoo.org, $13 Dec.-Feb. and $18 Mar.-Nov., ages 2-11 $13 Dec.-Feb. and $15 Mar.-Nov., children under 2 free.

2008

PENGUIN: Hatched Apr. 2, 2008
It's too early to tell whether baby Spud is a boy or girl, but it's already clear that this tiny, fuzzy, charcoal-grey Humboldt penguin is a crowd pleaser. Spud can be spotted in the zoo's Bird Valley, while its distant relatives live along the rocky western coast of Peru and Chile.
Who Knew? The male Humboldt preps the nest burrow by using his wings and feet to mold dried guano (seagull poop) and then cement it with soil and rocks. Parents alternate sitting on the eggs until they hatch, typically in 39 days.
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MONKEY: Born Mar. 15, 2008
Celebrities aren't the only ones to take some creative license with baby names. Bolivian titi monkeys Marjorie Belle and Bellini are the parents of Jack Sparrow—a likely nod to Pirates of the Caribbean's chattering monkey, Jack.
Who Knew? The Pirates trilogy stars not a furry orangish titi but capuchin monkeys, which have a different look: dark-brown or black body and cream-colored face and upper arms.

SIFAKA: Born Feb 8, 2008
The results from the popular vote are in. With a tally of 1,498 votes, Loka ("prize" in Malagasy) is the winning name for this baby sifaka. He joins his parents and other lemurs in PECO Primate Reserve.
Who Knew? In the wild, Coquerel's sifakas like Loka dwell in trees on the island of Madagascar. Their strong hind legs allow them to cover more than 30 feet in a single jump.
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OTTER: Born Nov. 3, 2007
Giant river otter Banjo is very protective of his youngest pup, whom zookeepers have named Rose. Like her five family members, Rose is playful and outgoing by nature. She likes to splash around the giant heated pool in the Carnivore Kingdom exhibit and fuels up on trout, tilapia, and herring.
Who Knew? Giant river otters are one of the rarest otter species, with only 2,000 to 5,000 left in the wild (mostly in the rivers of South American rain forests). A river otter's fur is so dense that water never gets past the outer hairs to the skin. Find more interesting facts at philadelphiazoo.org.
Aww...See the photo

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