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A state-by-state guide to travel restrictions in the US

By Maya Stanton
November 2, 2020
Shutterstock Rf 158411888
States such as New York are still imposing quarantine rules for travelers ©Shutterstock
Here's a state-by-state breakdown of travel restrictions across the country.

If you’re planning to travel between states for a vacation or a short trip, the situation is constantly changing, so it's best to check all local travel advisories before packing your bags. 


Editor's note: This story was last updated on November 2, 2020. We will update this piece regularly to stay on top of the latest travel advice.

Alabama

As of November 2, Alabama has no statewide restrictions on travel. According to the governor’s most recent coronavirus-related state of emergency proclamation, issued September 30, masks, social distancing, and other measures are required. Visit the Alabama Tourism Department’s website for updates.

Alaska

As of August 11, non-residents arriving from out of state must submit a travel declaration form and self-isolation plan to the Alaska travel portal, and either arrive with proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken 72 hours before departure or submit to a test upon arrival, which costs $250 and mandates a quarantine until the results are in. Negative pre-arrival test results can be uploaded to the portal in advance, and travelers awaiting their results can upload proof that they’ve taken the test as well, though they’ll have to quarantine in the meantime.

Residents of Alaska returning from another state or country must also follow the steps above, but they can either receive a free COVID-19 test upon arrival and self-quarantine until their results arrive, or skip straight to the self-quarantine – either for 14 days or the duration of their trip, whichever is shorter. See the state’s Safe Travels hub for further details. 

Arizona

As of November 2, there are no travel restrictions for individuals traveling to or through Arizona. Check with the Arizona Office of Tourism for updates.

Arkansas

As of November 2, Arkansas “encourage[s] potential travelers to assess their own health risks before traveling,” but no overarching guidelines are in place. The state’s Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism has updates.

California

California’s government is currently discouraging long-distance leisure travel to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but as of November, there are no restrictions on entering from another US state. Travelers are asked to wear a mask in public, keep 6ft away from anyone not in their household, check on local health guidance at all points along their itinerary from start to finish, and refrain from traveling if they’ve been sick in the past 14 days or live with someone with COVID-19. Check Visit California for travel alerts and updates. 

Colorado

As of November 2, Colorado has a statewide mask mandate that requires face coverings be worn indoors and, in some areas, outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. There are no restrictions on travel to the state at this time, but the Colorado Tourism Office has updates and details.

Connecticut

As part of a joint travel advisory issued with New York and New Jersey, anyone arriving in Connecticut from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. There are 41 states on the list as of October 27, and anyone entering from one of them must fill out a travel health form online or upon arrival, including returning citizens. Connecticut’s official state website has more details. 

Delaware

As of November 2, Delaware has no statewide travel restrictions in place, but social distancing is in effect and masks are required in all public spaces, including parks and boardwalks, and highly encouraged on beaches as well. See the Delaware Tourism Office’s website for information and updates. 

Florida

As of November 2, Florida has no travel restrictions in place, but the health department advises that crowds, closed spaces, close contact, and gatherings of more than 10 people should be avoided, and face coverings should be worn when social distancing isn’t possible. The state’s COVID-19 response site has more details. 

Georgia

As of November 2, there are no restrictions for travel to, from, or within Georgia, though social distancing, sanitation, and public health safety measures are in place and local restrictions may apply. Masks are encouraged, and home isolation is required for anyone who tests positive for COVID-19. For updates on travel restrictions, check the state of Georgia’s website. 

Hawaii

As of October 15, all US travelers will have an alternative to Hawaii’s mandatory 14-day quarantine: a pre-travel test with one of the state’s 11 trusted testing partners. Travelers have to register with the State of Hawaii Safe Travels online system, then submit to a temperature check and complete an online health questionnaire before they can leave the airport. Some counties may require a secondary test upon arrival, including the Big Island’s county of Hawaii, so travelers should check local mandates at their destination. Websites for the state’s tourism authority and transportation department have updates and details, as well as links to the individual counties’ websites.

Idaho

As of November 2, a 14-day self-quarantine is encouraged for anyone entering Ada County, which includes the city of Boise. The Visit Idaho website has information on the sanitation and social distancing requirements in some communities as well as travel resources across the state, and the governor’s Coronavirus Resources page has regular updates.

Illinois

Illinois doesn’t currently have any statewide travel restrictions in place, but Chicago has recently updated its emergency travel order requiring visitors from high-risk areas to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. As of November 2, there are 31 states and territories on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The Illinois Department of Public Health has guidance for travelers.

Indiana

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Indiana. The Indiana Department of Homeland Security’s travel website has information on restrictions within each individual county, and the state’s coronavirus hub has regular updates.

Iowa

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Iowa, but everyone over the age of 2 is “strongly encouraged” to wear masks in public, especially when social distancing isn’t possible. The Iowa Tourism Office has more information for travelers.

Kansas

As of November 2, there are no statewide restrictions in place in Kansas, but some residents and visitors are required to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the state: anyone who attended an out-of-state gathering of 500 people or more where social distancing and mask-wearing were not observed; anyone who has been on a cruise ship or river cruise since March; and anyone who has been notified by public health officials that they’ve been in close contact of a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19. The state’s Department of Health and Environment updates its travel quarantine list approximately every two weeks, and Kansas Tourism offers regular travel updates and resources. 

Kentucky

The latest update to Kentucky’s travel advisory was issued August 12 and recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for anyone entering from states and territories with a positive coronavirus testing rate equal to or greater than 15%, including Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Idaho, South Carolina, Texas, Alabama, and Arizona. Team Kentucky has COVID-19 reports and updates. 

Louisiana

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Louisiana, but a mask mandate remains in effect. The Louisiana tourism office has travel alerts and updates. 

Maine

As of November 2, all travelers visiting Maine must self-isolate for 14 days or have a negative COVID-19 antigen or PCR test within 72 hours of arrival; only those traveling from New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts are exempt. Maine’s Center for Disease Control & Prevention has travel advisories and updates.

Maryland

Since late July, Maryland has advised against nonessential travel to states with a 10% or higher positivity rate, including Alabama, Florida, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, South Carolina and Texas, as of November 2. People who travel to those states are required to get tested upon returning to Maryland and self-isolate while awaiting results. The tourism office has travel updates and alerts.

Massachusetts

As of August 1, all arrivals must quarantine for 14 days or present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of travel. Arrivals from high-risk states are required to fill out a health declaration form upon entering the state, and those caught breaking quarantine rules could face fines of up to $500 per day. Essential workers are exempt from the quarantine directive, as are those arriving from lower-risk states – California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont and Washington, as of November 2. Visit the Department of Public Health’s website for updates.

Michigan

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Michigan. For updates and guidelines, see the government’s coronavirus hub or the official tourism website

Minnesota

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Minnesota. Masks are required indoors. Explore Minnesota has details on the state’s COVID-19 protocols.

Mississippi

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Mississippi. The state’s tourism authority has travel alerts, and the health department has coronavirus updates. 

Missouri

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Missouri. Check with the state’s Division of Tourism for updates.

Montana

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Montana, but masks are required in counties with more than four active COVID-19 cases and encouraged everywhere else. The state’s seven Native American reservations may have different guidelines; visit the Montana tourism office for links to each tribal government’s website as well as general travel alerts.

Nebraska

As of November 2, travelers returning from international destinations are no longer required to self-quarantine and self-monitor for 14 days upon arrival, though strict social distancing is still recommended. The Nebraska Tourism Commission and the Department of Health and Human Services both have resources and recommendations for travelers.

Nevada

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in NevadaTravel Nevada and the Nevada Health Response both have information for travelers.

New Hampshire

As of November 2, travelers to New Hampshire from the surrounding states of Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island are no longer required to self-isolate, but those arriving from non-New England states for an extended stay will still need to quarantine for two weeks. Anyone overnighting at a lodging property is also required to sign a document stating that they “remained at home for at least a 14 day quarantine period prior to arriving in the state.” The Department of Health and Human Services has general travel and quarantine guidance, and the state’s official website has information for out-of-state visitors; for updates, see the website for the Division of Travel and Tourism Development.

New Jersey

Per an incoming travel advisory in effect in New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, anyone entering from an “impacted state” – those with an average daily number of new cases higher than 10 per 100,000 residents over a seven-day period, or those with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day period – is expected to quarantine for 14 days. As of November 2, there are 41 states and jurisdictions on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The state’s COVID-19 information hub has news and updates. 

New Mexico

As of November 2, travelers arriving in New Mexico by car or plane – from states other than Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington – are required to quarantine for 14 days, unless they can provide documentation of a valid negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of entry. Those awaiting test results must self-isolate, and masks are required across the state, with fines of up to $100 for violations. The tourism department has details on updates and exemptions.

New York

In a joint travel advisory with Connecticut and New Jersey, anyone arriving from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, including returning citizens and arrivals from Puerto Rico. Out-of-state travelers must fill out a health form upon arrival. Beginning November 4, out-of-state visitors may "test out" of the two-week quarantine. Travelers who were in another state for more than 24 hours must get a test within three days of departure from that state. Then, upon arrival to New York, they must quarantine for three days. On day four of their quarantine, the traveler must get a second COVID test. If both tests are negative, the traveler may leave quarantine early.

The list of states on the quarantine list is updated regularly as infection rates change, and the state’s coronavirus hub has updates as well.

North Carolina

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Carolina, and visitors are not required to quarantine upon arrival. Social distancing is encouraged, and cloth face coverings are required in public when physical distancing of 6 feet is not possible. See the state’s official website for COVID-19 travel resources.

North Dakota

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Dakota. The state’s Department of Health has guidance for travelers.

Ohio

Travelers visiting Ohio must quarantine for 14 days if traveling from states with a 15% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average – as of November 2, Alabama, South Dakota, Idaho, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Nevada, and Utah. For updates, visit Ohio’s coronavirus portal.

Oklahoma

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place, but anyone entering Oklahoma from an area with “substantial community spread” should wear a mask in public and refrain from attending indoor gatherings for 10 to 14 days. The state’s department of health has updates and travel advisories.

Oregon

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Oregon. Visit the tourism department’s website for travel alerts and information.

Pennsylvania

As of November 2, a 14-day quarantine is recommended for those arriving from Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Pennsylvania’s Department of Health has information for travelers.

Rhode Island

Anyone returning from an international destination must self-isolate for 14 days, as must those traveling into Rhode Island from states with a COVID-19 positivity rate higher than 5%. Arrivals who present a negative COVID-19 test result taken no later than 72 hours before travel can bypass quarantine, though quarantine is preferred as the best way of limiting the spread of COVID-19. Non-residents are required to complete a certificate of compliance and an out-of-state travel screening form upon arrival in Rhode Island. The Department of Health maintains a running list of states with travel restrictions upon entry to Rhode Island.

South Carolina

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place. Visit South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control for travel updates and information.

South Dakota

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in South Dakota, though some routes through tribal lands may be closed. Travelers should check their itinerary on SafeTravelUsa.com and consult the Department of Tourism’s document regarding travel restrictions on tribal lands.

Tennessee

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Tennessee. Check with the state’s Department of Tourist Development for updates.

Texas

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or mandatory quarantine requirements in place in Texas. Face coverings are required inside public spaces and outdoor areas where social distancing is not possible, and the government encourages travelers to review the health and safety guidance at their destinations. Travel Texas has updates and information.

Utah

As of November 2, there are no COVID-19 travel restrictions or quarantine requirements in Utah. Visit the state’s coronavirus hub for travel guidance.

Vermont

As of November 2, travelers to Vermont must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, unless they receive negative PCR test results on or after day 7 to end their quarantine early. For some travelers, quarantining at home before coming to Vermont is an option. See the Department of Health’s website for updates and details on exceptions to the quarantine requirement.

Virginia

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for people arriving from domestic or international destinations to Virginia, but masks are required in public buildings for anyone age 10 or older. Visit the Department of Health for travel updates.

Washington

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for arrivals to Washington, though people traveling from high-risk areas should quarantine for 14 days. Masks are required in public spaces indoors, and outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. The Department of Health has updates and frequently asked questions.

Washington, DC

All nonessential travel outside of the DC metro area is currently discouraged, and any nonessential traveler arriving from a high-risk area – with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average – is required to quarantine for 14 days. Travelers from the border states of Maryland and Virginia are exempt from this rule. For the current list of states requiring a quarantine, last updated November 2, visit Destination DC.

West Virginia

As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in West Virginia. Visit the tourism office’s website for updates and alerts.

Wisconsin

As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Wisconsin, but the government discourages all travel, including travel within the state and between multiple private homes, and recommends that people practice social distancing and stay home as much as possible. In some counties, there are travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners, so check for for area-specific safety updates, closures, and quarantine requirements before departure. Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services has updates and information for travelers.

Wyoming

As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place for US travelers in Wyoming. Visit Wyoming’s Department of Health for updates. 


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