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How Hotels Are Dealing With Sandy's Aftermath

By Kaeli Conforti
updated September 29, 2021
South Manhattan in the dark thanks to Hurricane Sandy
Courtesy <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/shankbone/8145644583/" target="_blank"> david_shankbone/Flickr</a>

Hotels have played a pivotal role in hurricane recovery in New York City, where residents are still in the midst of putting their own lives back together and trying to clean up what remains of their homes, locating loved ones, and helping their neighbors cope with Sandy's aftermath. There are stories on the news of local residents below 39th Street in Manhattan—where power is nonexistent—who took everything they could carry and chose to stay in hotels until things settle down and power, water, and heat are restored. In parts of Staten Island, probably the most damaged of the five boroughs, people evacuated to stronger built hotels and now have no homes to return to in the wake of the storm. This was a major problem when the marathon was still scheduled, since thousands of runners had reservations close to the Staten Island starting line. The Huffington Post reported that Richard Nicotra, the owner of the Hilton Garden Inn in Bloomfield, New Jersey, was standing up for the evacuees, and refusing to give their rooms to Marathon runners, an act which received plenty of praise on social media as more hoteliers continue to struggle with finding an appropriate solution.

At the same time, hotels in Manhattan below the power line (aka. at this time, anything south of 39th Street) are still putting up visitors on their properties with or without power. According to an article by USA Today, The NYC Pod Hotel is currently offering rooms for $160 a night and telling guests up front that there is no heat and barely any lighting except for the lobby and hallways, but there is hot water in the rooms and elevator access thanks to a back-up generator. Other hotels in the northeast are doing their part to help out, offering Sandy Specials and donating to American Red Cross relief efforts. Alternative hotels are getting in on it, too. Air B&B announced Wednesday it will not charge the extra fees it usually does to make a revenue so the money guests pay for a room goes straight to the people hosting-check out their Discounted Sandy Listings page for discounted rates aimed at helping out stranded travelers and those displaced by the hurricane.

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Survey Reveals The World's Friendliest Countries

Have you ever thought of dropping everything and just starting all over again in another country? A survey by HSBC found that 10 countries are at the top for expats around the world when it comes to acclimating to a new culture, language, and way of life. According to a story originally reported by Forbes Travel, the survey was given in May and June to 5,339 expatriates representing almost 100 countries, and asked participants important questions about what it was really like to live there. The country's economic and social factors that impact everyday life—like ease of making friends with locals, picking up the language, the level of community and social activity, as well as taxes, the amount of pollution, typical climate, and work-life balance—were taken into account to determine which countries were easiest to adjust to and which countries the expats would genuinely like to stay in. Here are the results of the survey, in order from last to first place: 10. Malaysia 9. South Africa 8. Bermuda 7. United States (remember, this is a survey taken by expats all over the world, not just Americans) 6. Spain 5. New Zealand 4. Canada 3. United Kingdom 2. Australia 1. Cayman Islands What do you think of these findings? Is there another country you would you love to live in someday? Tell us about it below.

Inspiration

Stranded By Sandy: A Personal Account

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Inspiration

A Hotel Inspired by a Restaurant?

According to Madonna, "you can tell how much fun a city is going to be if Nobu is in it." Inspired by this kind of culinary success, chef Nobu Matsuhisa is branching out into the hotel space, the Wall Street Journal reported. Will Nobu's new hotel live up to the hype that has been created by his restaurant empire? Well, you can soon find out for yourself. Booking is now open and they have already sold out for January, when the hotel officially unlocks its doors for business. It will be a hotel within a hotel in Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas. Rates start at $249 per night, which feels steep for Las Vegas—a city where rooms average $91 per night, according to one Hotwire report. The brand will be built around Nobu's signature cuisine, with room service carrying menu items such as yellowtail sushi with jalapeno and green tea waffles. The minibar will stock Japanese beer and sake and even the bath amenities, which are scented with rosemary and white tea, have been designed specifically for Nobu. David Rockwell, the designer of the first Nobu restaurant, was also the designer of the hotel, which has a modern, Japanese theme and rooms organized according to Feng Shui principles. They have six other properties planned across the world. It's certainly not the first brand to venture outside it's core business to open a hotel chain (Armani, for example), but it is the first restaurant that I know of to open a hotel. Depending on how they do, I wonder if this will start a trend among other popular restaurant chains?  Would you be inspired to check out a hotel that was opened by a restaurant you like? Or do you think restaurants should stick to what they do best—preparing food?

Inspiration

Hawaii Vacation Ideas: Tips For Visiting Kauai

I've got Hawaii on the brain. I recently wrote about the best places to see on the island of Oahu, the can't miss attractions of Maui, and recommendations for visiting the Big Island. Now here are my tips for things you shouldn't miss on the island of Kauai. Visit Waimea Canyon, "The Grand Canyon of the Pacific"The western side of Kauai is home to Waimea Canyon, about an hour's drive on scenic curvy roads that offer views of the nearby island of Ni'ihau (only accessible to native Hawaiians) and gorgeous views of the mountains, valleys, and the bluest ocean you've ever seen. "The Grand Canyon of the Pacific" features many of the same geological traits as its namesake—think crested buttes, deep gorges, and colorful rock formations—and is more than 3,600 feet deep, measuring 14 miles long by one mile wide. Stay on Waimea Canyon Drive and keep driving until you reach the Waimea Canyon Overlook. Honeymooners—Elvis fans—shouldn't miss a trip to the Fern GrottoIf thoughts of Kauai have you picturing scenes of The King in Blue Hawaii, the Fern Grotto is a spot you shouldn't miss. Entry to the grotto used to be forbidden to all except Hawaiian royalty, but nowaways anyone can catch a 40-minute cruise down the Wailua River to the site for about $20 per person ($10 for children ages 3-12) and take in views of one of Kauai's greatest natural wonders. Folks have been known to get married or renew their vows here, and if you're engaged, newlyweds, or celebrating a wedding anniversary, be prepared to come forward for a slow dance to Elvis Presley's Hawaiian Wedding Song—the Hawaiian lyrics in it were sung here long before the film. Hike, kayak, camp, and explore Kauai's secluded Na Pali CoastIf you're an outdoorsy person, nature lover, or just want to see some of the best views on the island without dealing with the tourist crowds, make sure you visit Kauai's beautiful Na Pali Coast. There are no roads on the westernmost side of the island, making it one of the last isolated, untouched, natural places in the Hawaiian Islands. Determined travelers can view the rocky terrain from the air with any number of helicoptor tours, or view the coastline from a boat tour or guided kayak trip, while more adventurous types can try hiking the 11-mile Kalalau Trail from Kee Beach to Kalalau Beach—the full hike is best broken up into a two-day trip, and camping permits are available for $20 per person per night (with a five night maximim stay) thorugh the Hawaii State Parks Department. Kokee State Park offers more challenging hiking trails, like Awaawapuhi Trail, that lead to scenic overlooks while other hikes like Cliff Canyon and Black Pipe Trail are better suited for family hiking trips. Drive up to a beautiful waterfallKauai is home to a number of impressive waterfalls, two of which are accessible by car alone. Wailua Falls is located just a few miles from downtown Lihue and can be viewed from the road, so there's no need to hike for a great view. Just drive north from Lihue to Ma'alo Road in Halamaulu, and follow the road uphill for another three miles. Another beautiful waterfall, Opaeka'a Falls, is viewable from Kuamo'o Road, but those wanting a closer look can brave the tough half-hour hike from the two-mile marker past the lookout point on Highway 580. Get a slice of Hawaiian historyHanapepe Town on Kauai's southwest coast is home to a bustling Hawaiian art scene, with an art celebration every Friday night from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. when the town's painters, sculptors, and other artists open their gallery and studio doors to showcase their work. Those seeking an authentic trip into Hawaii's past should visit the museums and historic sites along the Koloa Heritage Trail—visit the Kihaha'ouna Heiau (an ancient Hawaiian temple), Poipu Beach Park (home to the island's endangered Hawaiian monk seals), and other sites dating back to Kauai's former days as a sugar plantation hotspot. The Kilohana Plantation in Lihue is a 16,000 square-foot restored plantation estate that offers a chance to see what life was like in Kauai during the 1930s—also on-site is the Koloa Rum Company, where you can sample the island's best rum every half hour on the half hour beginning at 10 a.m. daily. Located on Kauai's North Shore about a 45 minute drive north of Lihue is the historic Kilauea Lighthouse, great for stunning views of the Pacific and access to the Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge, a safehaven for a number of native bird species found on the island including the endangered state bird, the nene goose.