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The fall foliage in New England is set to be remarkable – and early

By James Gabriel Martin
September 17, 2020
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© DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images
There’s some good news on the horizon for leaf peepers – weather experts are expecting a vibrant (and perhaps early) season this year.

If you’ve been lucky enough to travel through New England during fall, you’ll know that there’s nothing quite like kicking up the rust-colored leaves, hiking the rugged hills or driving down the open roads amidst the captivating hues of greens, oranges, reds and browns. Well there’s some good news on the horizon for leaf peepers – weather experts are expecting a vibrant (and perhaps early) season this year.

According to a Fall Foliage Forecast released by Yankee Magazine’s NewEngland.com, there is “potential for a big color punch this year if the right weather scenario lines up”. The magazine’s fall foliage expert, former meteorologist Jim Salge, has said that the season could go one of two ways, but both will be beautiful. The first scenario sees this year’s especially dry summer leading to more intense foliage colors, especially if it’s kick-started with an early cold spell. Cold fronts from Canada may lead to a striking display that makes the foliage dazzling, but it may lack longevity. The second scenario sees tropical weather activity making for a longer-lasting display that will still delight, although it will be less intense.

vermontVermont experiences beautiful colors every year during autumn © Sean Pavone / Shutterstock

Stressed trees tend to change their colors earlier, and if they do, they are more prone to producing red pigments as green ones fade. Because of this, a short but bright burst of color is expected in late September in northern New England and from mid- to late-October in southern New England.

CLICK HERE FOR THE BEST NEW ENGLAND FALL FOLIAGE ROAD TRIP ITINERARY


Jim Salge also shared with Lonely Planet what he feels makes New England so unique during that time of year. “About 90% of the land in New England is forested. In the northern zones especially, much of the forest is dominated by sugar maple, which is a tree that can turn anywhere from yellow to bright red depending on the weather and conditions in any given year. Leaf peeping is part of the culture. People drive around, look at leaves, and plan trips each year to coincide with the best colors. Because of COVID-19, this fall will be different. But the outdoors is among the safest places we can be, and many people have responded to the pandemic by getting more in touch with nature. There are still plenty of ways to safely enjoy the beautiful tapestry of colors and the crisp autumn weather.”

Fall FoliageFall foliage expert Jim Salge said this year is likely to be striking © Dene' Miles / Shutterstock

Some of Jim’s favorite spots include Smugglers Notch in Vermont, and Crawford Notch in New Hampshire, protected forest areas where glaciers came through during the last ice age, providing spectacular viewing. The full forecast is due to be updated on www.NewEngland.com. The website also lists suggested outdoors activities and events, as well as weekly posts focusing on the best place to find color on any given weekend.


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What a sustainable restart to travel could look like

Once the COVID-19 lockdowns, quarantines and restrictions end, I know I’m absolutely raring to start traveling again. But one of the things that many of us are coming to realise is just how fragile the world we love to explore is, and how important it is to be good stewards of it while we do so. There’s a whole industry out there for ecologically friendly holidays, and that’s great. But beyond the eco-yurt – although we do love a good eco-yurt – there are choices that we can all make to reduce our contributions to climate change when we start traveling again. Many older aircraft won't return to the skies © imagean / Getty Images / iStockphotoNewer aircraft with lower emissions For most travelers flying to their destination, the airline journey will be the largest part of their environmental footprint. That’s not just because of the emissions produced, but also because they’re released at higher altitudes, which amplifies their effect. 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Inspiration

The future of museums amid unsettling times

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Inspiration

This interactive map will guide you to the best fall colors in the US

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Inspiration

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August 2, 2007 was a historic day in America. On that day, the bitter partisanship that pretty much defines American politics was cast aside to pass a bill that declared bourbon to be our “National Spirit” and established September as National Bourbon Heritage Month. And here’s the best part: They passed the bill unanimously. Yes, unanimously. As further evidence of bourbon’s importance to American heritage as well as the nation’s economy, this isn’t the first time Congress passed a law involving the industry. In 1967, it passed a bill to define bourbon as a whiskey that must be distilled from at least 51% corn and aged in a new charred American white oak barrel and just as Champagne can only be made in the region of the same name in France and Iberico ham can only come from Spain and Portugal, bourbon must be made in the USA. Which brings us to today. The bourbon industry is exploding—there were over 6.7 million barrels aging in Kentucky in 2015, which works out to 1.5 barrels for every citizen of the state. So-called “whiskey pilgrims,” from millennial enthusiasts to seasoned aficionados, have been flocking to Kentucky to visit bourbon distilleries and see how the spirit is made. But even before bourbon growth took off, the Kentucky Distillers’ Association, a trade organization, founded the Kentucky Bourbon Trail in 1999. (Bourbon production increased 315% since then, from 455,078 barrels in 1999 to 1,886,821 in 2015). The KBT is an invaluable resource for anyone wanting to head to the source and see craftsmanship in action. And the best part: the guidance the KBT provides is completely free. Each distillery offers tours that show the many steps of whiskey-making, from fermenting to distilling to barreling to bottling and, of course, what would a tour be without a lesson in tasting. The distilleries charge a minimal admission fee. It’s worth it. Just go to the site and download the app. It shows the number of miles between distilleries, which ranges between eight and 70, and lot of other helpful logistical details. There are nine distilleries on the trail. They’ve created a neat little “passport” for you to take from stop to stop. Get it stamped at each distillery and if send it to the KDA when it’s all filled in, they send you a t-shirt. Among the stops is the iconic Maker’s Mark Distillery, a National Historic Landmark. It’s set up with the house of its founders replicated to period detail. You can watch workers dip the bottles in the red wax Maker’s is known for and even try it for yourself in the gift shop. The massive Jim Beam Distillery is a mighty sight to behold, what with 76.5 million bottles of spirits shipped to 100 countries from there each year. This is indeed the slickest stop on the tour. The company is in its seventh generation of Beams and old-school heritage looms large in its mythology, yet it’s all presented with all kinds of digital bells and whistles. The visitor center is a veritable multi-story museum, with interactive educational elements. They also offer an interactive multi-sensory tour and a decanter museum that would make an antiques collector swoon. Prepare to spend a lot of time here. Heaven Hill, the oldest family-run distillery, offers the Bourbon Heritage Center, a museum of bourbon, past to present. Wild Turkey and Four Roses have both invested vast sums in the last few years to open stunning visitor centers at their historic distilleries, each one a shrine to American heritage. With all the tourist pouring into (sorry, no pun intended) the state, they need someplace to eat and drink after a day of touring. Louisville has become quite an urban destination. Inventive restaurants are opening at a rapid clip, and meantime, some of the longstanding institutions banded together to form the Urban Bourbon Trail, a guide to some of the most incredible bourbon bars in Louisville, which basically means the most incredible bourbon bars in the world.

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