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    Boise,

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    Boise, Idaho’s Capital City is unlike most cities. The City of Trees is a rare blend of urban and outdoors; active and relaxing; family-friendly and unforgettable. It boasts interesting and unique sites and attractions, unlimited recreation, and diverse cultural offerings.

    At the foot of the scenic Boise Front, Boise boasts several Fortune 500 companies with national and international headquarters or divisions, sprawling high-tech campuses and a major university with a distinctive blue football field. This city, with a river running through it, enjoys its easily accessible outdoors as much as its eclectic urban offerings.

    Boise is really coming into its own as a hip Pacific Northwest city, with a lot of growth and a vibrant downtown. Boise has the largest concentrated Basque population in the U.S. The downtown features an entire city block dedicated to the Basque culture where visitors can experience Basque food, wine, sports, history and culture.

    Hikers and bikers have almost 200 miles of trails available in the foothills just above Boise, with trailheads right in town and 104 parks. The wine and craft beer industries have also been gaining national recognition. There are nearly 40 wineries and 20 unique craft breweries within the Boise valley--many within city limits.

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    InspirationDestinations

    Unique New Years Eve Drops

    Everyone knows that New York City is famous for its New Year’s Eve ball drop in Times Square, but for those looking for something a little more unique and symbolic to ring in 2022, these towns are hosting slightly weird yet totally “on-brand” drops on December 31. MoonPie Drop , Mobile, Alabama Photo by Joseph Brooke / Flickr Creative Commons Mobile’s mantra is “Born to Celebrate,” which makes New Year’s Eve a pretty exciting time around here. At midnight, you can witness a 600-pound electric MoonPie drop from the sky, complete with fireworks and a laser light show. Mobile’s big claim to fame is that it’s home to America’s original Mardi Gras. In the mid-1900s, locals started tossing sticky-sweet (but still-wrapped!) MoonPies from their Mardi Gras floats. Spectators went crazy for them and today an estimated half-million pies get tossed during an average Carnival season. Since Mobile loves a good party – and consumes more MoonPies per capita than anywhere else (including the pies’ hometown of Chattanooga) – its citizens decided to create the world’s largest electric MoonPie to help them usher in each new year. Mushroom Drop, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, which is part of the Brandywine Valley, is known as the “Mushroom Capital of the World” because more than 60% of all the mushrooms in the United States are grown here. Celebrate their nickname – and their favorite crop -- by dropping a 700-pound lighted mushroom on New Year’s Eve during the annual Midnight in the Square event. The mushroom will be raised right before 9 p.m. and the drop will be live-streamed across social media at midnight. Marlin Drop, Orange Beach, Alabama Gulf Shores Reelin' in the New Year at The Wharf The Wharf, a popular dining, shopping and entertainment district in the town of Orange Beach, is hosting Reelin’ in The New Year from 5 p.m. to midnight on December 31. The highlight of this event is the Marlin Drop, a fishy nod to one of the many outdoor activities that draw visitors here year round. It’s free admission for the drop, and the whole family can come and ring in the new year Gulf Coast-style. Apple Drop, Winchester, Virginia To celebrate the arrival of the new year, a 400-pound apple is dropped more than 100 feet during the First Night Winchester event. First Night Winchester has been a tradition in the Northern Shenandoah Valley since 1987. Winchester is known as the “Apple Capital” because it’s the largest apple-producing area in all of Virginia and home to countless apple orchards. Giant Acorn Drop, Raleigh, N.C. Courtesy firstnightraleigh.com Each December 31 a giant copper acorn, the official monument commemorating the bicentennial of “the City of Oaks,” is transported from Raleigh’s Moore Square to the roof of the Civic Center where it’s dropped to celebrate the New Year - First Night Raleigh. Clam Drop, Yarmouth, Maine On December 31, Yarmouth's First Universalist Church lowers a giant clam named Steamer 25 feet from the bell tower. The Clam Drop includes music, cookies and cocoa to stay warm. Giant Potato Drop, Boise, Idaho Courtesy mrfood.com This year will be the 9th annual Idaho Potato Drop in Boise, Idaho. From 1 p.m. to 1 a.m., ring in the new year with food trucks, a beer garden, fireworks, and of course, the potato drop in front of the Idaho State Capitol.

    Inspiration

    Can’t Get to Europe? These U.S. Destinations Will Make You Feel Like You’re There

    With much of Europe off limits amid the current pandemic, Americans will have to wait longer to travel to and throughout the continent. However, they can find resemblances to some European countries a little closer to home. Here are locations across the U.S. that make you feel like you’ve set foot in a European destination with no passport required. To feel like you're in Greece... Head to Tarpon Springs, Florida More than one in 10 residents in this Gulf Coast city claim Greek ancestry, with Greek immigrants arriving in the late 19th century. They also gave Tarpon Springs the moniker, “The Sponge Capital of the World,” in that divers would apply the Greek Islands tradition of diving for sponges to Floridian waters. Nowadays, Greek heritage can be seen with locals in coffee shops along Athens Street. Along Dodecanese Boulevard, shop at Getaguru Handmade Soap Company and dine at Mykonos and Hellas Greek Restaurant. The Netherlands... Holland, Michigan Founded in the mid-19th century, this city on the shores of Lake Michigan makes you feel like you’ve set foot in the Netherlands. Experience a Dutch wonderland at the Windmill Island Gardens, with a windmill that grinds West Michigan sourced wheat into flour, while Nelis' Dutch Village shows the traditional making of wooden shoes. Every May, take in its Tulip Time Festival; later on in the year, do your holiday shopping at Kerstmarkt. Pella, Iowa Another Dutch destination, this Iowa location is all heritage museums, Dutch architecture, and the Vermeer Windmill, the tallest working grain windmill in the U.S. Then there’s Klokkenspel, a carillon clock going off on odd hours and with historic figurines coming in and out. And cuisine options are plenty, from Dutch bakeries’ Jaarsma Bakery and Vander Ploeg Bakery to Dutch Fix, serving up Dutch street food. lowthian, Getty Spain... St. Augustine, Florida As the nation’s oldest city, this former Spanish settlement is still noted through Colonial-style architecture and historic venues. Avile Street is the oldest street in the U.S. and is now an arts district with galleries and restaurants and historic venues. The Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, an old Spanish fortification built to protect their claim on the Atlantic trade route, is now overseen by the National Park Service. Denmark... Solvang, California Referred to as the “Danish capital of America,” this village in Santa Ynez Valley gets quite festive with its Solvang Julefest, a holiday event; Solvang Grape Stomp, a wine harvesting celebration; and Solvang Danish Days, a full-blown heritage festival. Regularly, you can see a copy of Denmark’s famous Little Mermaid sculpture and Elverhøj Museum of History & Art, whose exterior resembles an 18th-century Danish farmhouse. But be sure to try Danish pastries at bakeries including Aebleskiver Café and Birkholm's Bakery & Cafe. California, USA - August 6th, 2019 : Solvang Brewing Company in Solvang Historic Downtown, a Danish Village in Santa Ynez Valley. nicolasboivin, Getty Poland... New Britain, Connecticut Nicknamed “Little Poland,” this Hartford County city’s section of Broad Street continues the legacy built by Polish immigrants coming to work in factories over two centuries ago. It’s known for its annual Little Poland Festival, which holds cultural and family-friendly activities. Do some shopping in Polmart, a store with all things Polish, or for pierogis and stuffed cabbage at Roly Poly Bakery. Or order a meal at the highly recommended Staropolska Restaurant. Basque Region... Boise, Idaho With the most concentrated population of Basques living in the U.S., the “Basque Block” is a downtown section along Grove Street reflecting this legacy dating back two centuries. The Basque Museum and Cultural Center tells the history behind these emigrants from this northern Spain. The Basque Market carries Txakoli, Basque and Spanish wines and is known for weekly preparing giant paellas on the street. Go pintxo hopping at Txikiteo and Bar Gernika Basque Pub and Eatery. knowlesgallery, GettySwitzerland... New Glarus, Wisconsin Referred to as “America’s Little Switzerland,” this Wisconsin village showcases its Alpine-style architecture and a Cow Parade of statues depicting these dairy-producing animals. Established in 1845 by Swiss immigrants, New Glarus holds a Harvest Fest in October, where daily routines and responsibilities of the past – cheese making, blacksmithing, yarn spinning, you name it – are re-created. And at Emmi Roth Käse Cheese Factory, a Swiss-owned cheesemaker, take a self-guided tour. Germany... New Braunfels, Texas Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels arrived in what’s now the Texas Hill Country to motivate the founding of this 19th-century German colony. His royal presence lives on in murals depicting him and other key figures in The New Braunfels Historic Outdoor Art Museum. Head to Krause’s Cafe for its Biergarten and German fare, and the Gruene Historic District is where German farmers lived but now has a hopping’ dance hall, general store, and restaurant. Every November, Wurstfest serves up a German food-focused celebration. Leavenworth, Washington In the 1960s, officials decided to make this Deadwood-looking town into a Bavarian village to attract visitors. Today, its architecture is full of beamed houses with other German features ranging from restaurants (try the Bavarian Bistro and Bar) to German named gift shops (with European ornaments at Kris Kringl). Sweden... Lindsborg, Kansas Known as “Little Sweden, USA,” this city in Kansas’s Smoky Valley was settled by Swedish immigrants in the 1860s and Lindsborg still celebrates its Scandinavian roots through Swedish traditions year-round. Their event calendar includes St. Lucia Festival in December; Våffeldagen, which celebrates Swedish waffles in March; and Svensk Hyllningsfest, a biennial celebration. Spot sculptures of the Swedish Dala Horse around town and purchase a hand painted one from Hemslöjd. Italy... Napa Valley, California Giving a Tuscan landscape vibe, this wine-producing destination boasts wineries whose architectural features make you feel like you’re in Italy or another similar European countryside. To start, the Castello di Amorosa gives off the feeling of exploring a hill town in Tuscany or Umbria, with its 13th-century-style winery. Napa Valley is also noted for producing another associated Italian export -- oil olive -- and sample the bounty produced at Napa Valley Olive Oil Manufacturing Company. Napa Valley wine country mountain hillside vineyard growing crops for grape harvest and winery winemaking. Rows of lush, green grapevines ripen in cultivated agricultural farm fields glowing in sunset. Spondylolithesis, GettyFrance... New Orleans, French Quarter, Louisiana While bounced between the Spanish and influenced by indigenous peoples and African Americans, New Orleans was first founded and settled by the French. Their imprint lingers within nearby Cajun country, with those speaking “Louisiana French,” and in NOLA’s French Quarter, the city’s most famous neighborhood. Here, dine on fine French and Creole cuisine at Arnaud’s, Galatoire's, and Antoine’s Restaurant. New Orleans, USA - April 22, 2018: People ordering food in Cafe Du Monde restaurant, eating beignet powdered sugar donuts, drinking chicory coffee, waiter taking order. ablokhin, Getty England... Alexandria, Virginia Founded by Scottish merchants in 1749, this city outside of Washington, D.C. gives off a Colonial English vibe within its Old Town District. Captain’s Row is a cobblestone streetscape, while the brick-lined King Street has many shopping ops. The Old Town Farmers’ Market has been in existence since before the American Revolution; George Washington sent produce grown at nearby Mount Vernon to be sold there.

    Inspiration

    Can’t Get to Europe? These U.S. Destinations Will Make You Feel Like You’re There

    With much of Europe off limits amid the current pandemic, Americans will have to wait longer to travel to and throughout the continent. However, they can find resemblances to some European countries a little closer to home. Here are locations across the U.S. that make you feel like you’ve set foot in a European destination with no passport required. Greece Tarpon Springs, Florida More than one in 10 residents in this Gulf Coast city claim Greek ancestry, with Greek immigrants arriving in the late 19th century. They also gave Tarpon Springs the moniker, “The Sponge Capital of the World,” in that divers would apply the Greek Islands tradition of diving for sponges to Floridian waters. Nowadays, Greek heritage can be seen with locals in coffee shops along Athens Street. Along Dodecanese Boulevard, shop at Getaguru Handmade Soap Company and dine at Mykonos and Hellas Greek Restaurant. Pella, Iowa. The Netherlands Holland, Michigan Founded in the mid-19th century, this city on the shores of Lake Michigan makes you feel like you’ve set foot in the Netherlands. Experience a Dutch wonderland at the Windmill Island Gardens, with a windmill that grinds West Michigan sourced wheat into flour, while Nelis' Dutch Village shows the traditional making of wooden shoes. Every May, take in its Tulip Time Festival; later on in the year, do your holiday shopping at Kerstmarkt. Pella, Iowa Another Dutch destination, this Iowa location is all heritage museums, Dutch architecture, and the Vermeer Windmill, the tallest working grain windmill in the U.S. Then there’s Klokkenspel, a carillon clock going off on odd hours and with historic figurines coming in and out. And cuisine options are plenty, from Dutch bakeries’ Jaarsma Bakery and Vander Ploeg Bakery to Dutch Fix, serving up Dutch street food. Denmark Solvang, California Referred to as the “Danish capital of America,” this village in Santa Ynez Valley gets quite festive with its Solvang Julefest, a holiday event; Solvang Grape Stomp, a wine harvesting celebration; and Solvang Danish Days, a full-blown heritage festival. Regularly, you can see a copy of Denmark’s famous Little Mermaid sculpture and Elverhøj Museum of History & Art, whose exterior resembles an 18th-century Danish farmhouse. But be sure to try Danish pastries at bakeries including Aebleskiver Café and Birkholm's Bakery & Cafe. St. Augustine, Florida. ©Sean Pavone/Shutterstock Spain St. Augustine, Florida As the nation’s oldest city, this former Spanish settlement is still noted through Colonial-style architecture and historic venues. Avile Street is the oldest street in the U.S. and is now an arts district with galleries and restaurants and historic venues. The Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, an old Spanish fortification built to protect their claim on the Atlantic trade route, is now overseen by the National Park Service. Poland New Britain, Connecticut Nicknamed “Little Poland,” this Hartford County city’s section of Broad Street continues the legacy built by Polish immigrants coming to work in factories over two centuries ago. It’s known for its annual Little Poland Festival, which holds cultural and family-friendly activities. Do some shopping in Polmart, a store with all things Polish, or for pierogis and stuffed cabbage at Roly Poly Bakery. Or order a meal at the highly recommended Staropolska Restaurant. Basque Region Boise, Idaho With the most concentrated population of Basques living in the U.S., the “Basque Block” is a downtown section along Grove Street reflecting this legacy dating back two centuries. The Basque Museum and Cultural Center tells the history behind these emigrants from this northern Spain. The Basque Market carries Txakoli, Basque and Spanish wines and is known for weekly preparing giant paellas on the street. Go pintxo hopping at Txikiteo and Bar Gernika Basque Pub and Eatery. Switzerland New Glarus, Wisconsin Referred to as “America’s Little Switzerland,” this Wisconsin village showcases its Alpine-style architecture and a Cow Parade of statues depicting these dairy-producing animals. Established in 1845 by Swiss immigrants, New Glarus holds a Harvest Fest in October, where daily routines and responsibilities of the past – cheese making, blacksmithing, yarn spinning, you name it – are re-created. And at Emmi Roth Käse Cheese Factory, a Swiss-owned cheesemaker, take a self-guided tour. Helen, Georgia. ©SeanPavonePhoto/Getty Images Germany New Braunfels, Texas Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels arrived in what’s now the Texas Hill Country to motivate the founding of this 19th-century German colony. His royal presence lives on in murals depicting him and other key figures in The New Braunfels Historic Outdoor Art Museum. Head to Krause’s Cafe for its Biergarten and German fare, and the Gruene Historic District is where German farmers lived but now has a hopping’ dance hall, general store, and restaurant. Every November, Wurstfest serves up a German food-focused celebration. Leavenworth, Washington In the 1960s, officials decided to make this Deadwood-looking town into a Bavarian village to attract visitors. Today, its architecture is full of beamed houses with other German features ranging from restaurants (try the Bavarian Bistro and Bar) to German named gift shops (with European ornaments at Kris Kringl). Helen, Georgia This Georgia town is tucked into the Blue Ridge mountains, and has been designed to look and feel like an Alpine village in Bavaria. You'll spend the day visiting charming shops and walking on cobblestone streets. Roadtrippers will enjoy having access to the Russell-Brasstown Scenic Byway that highlights the beauty of the Blue Ridge and starts in Helen. Sweden Lindsborg, Kansas Known as “Little Sweden, USA,” this city in Kansas’s Smoky Valley was settled by Swedish immigrants in the 1860s and Lindsborg still celebrates its Scandinavian roots through Swedish traditions year-round. Their event calendar includes St. Lucia Festival in December; Våffeldagen, which celebrates Swedish waffles in March; and Svensk Hyllningsfest, a biennial celebration. Spot sculptures of the Swedish Dala Horse around town and purchase a hand painted one from Hemslöjd. Napa Valley. ©Michael Warwick/Shutterstock Italy Napa Valley, California Giving a Tuscan landscape vibe, this wine-producing destination boasts wineries whose architectural features make you feel like you’re in Italy or another similar European countryside. To start, the Castello di Amorosa gives off the feeling of exploring a hill town in Tuscany or Umbria, with its 13th-century-style winery. Napa Valley is also noted for producing another associated Italian export -- oil olive -- and sample the bounty produced at Napa Valley Olive Oil Manufacturing Company. New Orleans French Quarter. ©mixmotive/Getty Images France New Orleans While bounced between the Spanish and influenced by indigenous peoples and African Americans, New Orleans was first founded and settled by the French. Their imprint lingers within nearby Cajun country, with those speaking “Louisiana French,” and in NOLA’s French Quarter, the city’s most famous neighborhood. Here, dine on fine French and Creole cuisine at Arnaud’s, Galatoire's, and Antoine’s Restaurant. England Alexandria, Virginia Founded by Scottish merchants in 1749, this city outside of Washington, D.C. gives off a Colonial English vibe within its Old Town District. Captain’s Row is a cobblestone streetscape, while the brick-lined King Street has many shopping ops. The Old Town Farmers’ Market has been in existence since before the American Revolution; George Washington sent produce grown at nearby Mount Vernon to be sold there.

    News

    A state-by-state guide to travel restrictions in the US

    If you’re planning to travel between states for a vacation or a short trip, the situation is constantly changing, so it's best to check all local travel advisories before packing your bags. Editor's note: This story was last updated on November 2, 2020. We will update this piece regularly to stay on top of the latest travel advice. Alabama As of November 2, Alabama has no statewide restrictions on travel. According to the governor’s most recent coronavirus-related state of emergency proclamation, issued September 30, masks, social distancing, and other measures are required. Visit the Alabama Tourism Department’s website for updates. Alaska As of August 11, non-residents arriving from out of state must submit a travel declaration form and self-isolation plan to the Alaska travel portal, and either arrive with proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken 72 hours before departure or submit to a test upon arrival, which costs $250 and mandates a quarantine until the results are in. Negative pre-arrival test results can be uploaded to the portal in advance, and travelers awaiting their results can upload proof that they’ve taken the test as well, though they’ll have to quarantine in the meantime. Residents of Alaska returning from another state or country must also follow the steps above, but they can either receive a free COVID-19 test upon arrival and self-quarantine until their results arrive, or skip straight to the self-quarantine – either for 14 days or the duration of their trip, whichever is shorter. See the state’s Safe Travels hub for further details. Arizona As of November 2, there are no travel restrictions for individuals traveling to or through Arizona. Check with the Arizona Office of Tourism for updates. Arkansas As of November 2, Arkansas “encourage[s] potential travelers to assess their own health risks before traveling,” but no overarching guidelines are in place. The state’s Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism has updates. California California’s government is currently discouraging long-distance leisure travel to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but as of November, there are no restrictions on entering from another US state. Travelers are asked to wear a mask in public, keep 6ft away from anyone not in their household, check on local health guidance at all points along their itinerary from start to finish, and refrain from traveling if they’ve been sick in the past 14 days or live with someone with COVID-19. Check Visit California for travel alerts and updates. Colorado As of November 2, Colorado has a statewide mask mandate that requires face coverings be worn indoors and, in some areas, outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. There are no restrictions on travel to the state at this time, but the Colorado Tourism Office has updates and details. Connecticut As part of a joint travel advisory issued with New York and New Jersey, anyone arriving in Connecticut from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. There are 41 states on the list as of October 27, and anyone entering from one of them must fill out a travel health form online or upon arrival, including returning citizens. Connecticut’s official state website has more details. Delaware As of November 2, Delaware has no statewide travel restrictions in place, but social distancing is in effect and masks are required in all public spaces, including parks and boardwalks, and highly encouraged on beaches as well. See the Delaware Tourism Office’s website for information and updates. Florida As of November 2, Florida has no travel restrictions in place, but the health department advises that crowds, closed spaces, close contact, and gatherings of more than 10 people should be avoided, and face coverings should be worn when social distancing isn’t possible. The state’s COVID-19 response site has more details. Georgia As of November 2, there are no restrictions for travel to, from, or within Georgia, though social distancing, sanitation, and public health safety measures are in place and local restrictions may apply. Masks are encouraged, and home isolation is required for anyone who tests positive for COVID-19. For updates on travel restrictions, check the state of Georgia’s website. Hawaii As of October 15, all US travelers will have an alternative to Hawaii’s mandatory 14-day quarantine: a pre-travel test with one of the state’s 11 trusted testing partners. Travelers have to register with the State of Hawaii Safe Travels online system, then submit to a temperature check and complete an online health questionnaire before they can leave the airport. Some counties may require a secondary test upon arrival, including the Big Island’s county of Hawaii, so travelers should check local mandates at their destination. Websites for the state’s tourism authority and transportation department have updates and details, as well as links to the individual counties’ websites. Idaho As of November 2, a 14-day self-quarantine is encouraged for anyone entering Ada County, which includes the city of Boise. The Visit Idaho website has information on the sanitation and social distancing requirements in some communities as well as travel resources across the state, and the governor’s Coronavirus Resources page has regular updates. Illinois Illinois doesn’t currently have any statewide travel restrictions in place, but Chicago has recently updated its emergency travel order requiring visitors from high-risk areas to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. As of November 2, there are 31 states and territories on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The Illinois Department of Public Health has guidance for travelers. Indiana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Indiana. The Indiana Department of Homeland Security’s travel website has information on restrictions within each individual county, and the state’s coronavirus hub has regular updates. Iowa As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Iowa, but everyone over the age of 2 is “strongly encouraged” to wear masks in public, especially when social distancing isn’t possible. The Iowa Tourism Office has more information for travelers. Kansas As of November 2, there are no statewide restrictions in place in Kansas, but some residents and visitors are required to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the state: anyone who attended an out-of-state gathering of 500 people or more where social distancing and mask-wearing were not observed; anyone who has been on a cruise ship or river cruise since March; and anyone who has been notified by public health officials that they’ve been in close contact of a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19. The state’s Department of Health and Environment updates its travel quarantine list approximately every two weeks, and Kansas Tourism offers regular travel updates and resources. Kentucky The latest update to Kentucky’s travel advisory was issued August 12 and recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for anyone entering from states and territories with a positive coronavirus testing rate equal to or greater than 15%, including Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Idaho, South Carolina, Texas, Alabama, and Arizona. Team Kentucky has COVID-19 reports and updates. Louisiana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Louisiana, but a mask mandate remains in effect. The Louisiana tourism office has travel alerts and updates. Maine As of November 2, all travelers visiting Maine must self-isolate for 14 days or have a negative COVID-19 antigen or PCR test within 72 hours of arrival; only those traveling from New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts are exempt. Maine’s Center for Disease Control & Prevention has travel advisories and updates. Maryland Since late July, Maryland has advised against nonessential travel to states with a 10% or higher positivity rate, including Alabama, Florida, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, South Carolina and Texas, as of November 2. People who travel to those states are required to get tested upon returning to Maryland and self-isolate while awaiting results. The tourism office has travel updates and alerts. Massachusetts As of August 1, all arrivals must quarantine for 14 days or present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of travel. Arrivals from high-risk states are required to fill out a health declaration form upon entering the state, and those caught breaking quarantine rules could face fines of up to $500 per day. Essential workers are exempt from the quarantine directive, as are those arriving from lower-risk states – California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont and Washington, as of November 2. Visit the Department of Public Health’s website for updates. Michigan As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Michigan. For updates and guidelines, see the government’s coronavirus hub or the official tourism website. Minnesota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Minnesota. Masks are required indoors. Explore Minnesota has details on the state’s COVID-19 protocols. Mississippi As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Mississippi. The state’s tourism authority has travel alerts, and the health department has coronavirus updates. Missouri As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Missouri. Check with the state’s Division of Tourism for updates. Montana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Montana, but masks are required in counties with more than four active COVID-19 cases and encouraged everywhere else. The state’s seven Native American reservations may have different guidelines; visit the Montana tourism office for links to each tribal government’s website as well as general travel alerts. Nebraska As of November 2, travelers returning from international destinations are no longer required to self-quarantine and self-monitor for 14 days upon arrival, though strict social distancing is still recommended. The Nebraska Tourism Commission and the Department of Health and Human Services both have resources and recommendations for travelers. Nevada As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Nevada. Travel Nevada and the Nevada Health Response both have information for travelers. New Hampshire As of November 2, travelers to New Hampshire from the surrounding states of Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island are no longer required to self-isolate, but those arriving from non-New England states for an extended stay will still need to quarantine for two weeks. Anyone overnighting at a lodging property is also required to sign a document stating that they “remained at home for at least a 14 day quarantine period prior to arriving in the state.” The Department of Health and Human Services has general travel and quarantine guidance, and the state’s official website has information for out-of-state visitors; for updates, see the website for the Division of Travel and Tourism Development. New Jersey Per an incoming travel advisory in effect in New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, anyone entering from an “impacted state” – those with an average daily number of new cases higher than 10 per 100,000 residents over a seven-day period, or those with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day period – is expected to quarantine for 14 days. As of November 2, there are 41 states and jurisdictions on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The state’s COVID-19 information hub has news and updates. New Mexico As of November 2, travelers arriving in New Mexico by car or plane – from states other than Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington – are required to quarantine for 14 days, unless they can provide documentation of a valid negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of entry. Those awaiting test results must self-isolate, and masks are required across the state, with fines of up to $100 for violations. The tourism department has details on updates and exemptions. New York In a joint travel advisory with Connecticut and New Jersey, anyone arriving from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, including returning citizens and arrivals from Puerto Rico. Out-of-state travelers must fill out a health form upon arrival. Beginning November 4, out-of-state visitors may "test out" of the two-week quarantine. Travelers who were in another state for more than 24 hours must get a test within three days of departure from that state. Then, upon arrival to New York, they must quarantine for three days. On day four of their quarantine, the traveler must get a second COVID test. If both tests are negative, the traveler may leave quarantine early. The list of states on the quarantine list is updated regularly as infection rates change, and the state’s coronavirus hub has updates as well. North Carolina As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Carolina, and visitors are not required to quarantine upon arrival. Social distancing is encouraged, and cloth face coverings are required in public when physical distancing of 6 feet is not possible. See the state’s official website for COVID-19 travel resources. North Dakota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Dakota. The state’s Department of Health has guidance for travelers. Ohio Travelers visiting Ohio must quarantine for 14 days if traveling from states with a 15% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average – as of November 2, Alabama, South Dakota, Idaho, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Nevada, and Utah. For updates, visit Ohio’s coronavirus portal. Oklahoma As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place, but anyone entering Oklahoma from an area with “substantial community spread” should wear a mask in public and refrain from attending indoor gatherings for 10 to 14 days. The state’s department of health has updates and travel advisories. Oregon As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Oregon. Visit the tourism department’s website for travel alerts and information. Pennsylvania As of November 2, a 14-day quarantine is recommended for those arriving from Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Pennsylvania’s Department of Health has information for travelers. Rhode Island Anyone returning from an international destination must self-isolate for 14 days, as must those traveling into Rhode Island from states with a COVID-19 positivity rate higher than 5%. Arrivals who present a negative COVID-19 test result taken no later than 72 hours before travel can bypass quarantine, though quarantine is preferred as the best way of limiting the spread of COVID-19. Non-residents are required to complete a certificate of compliance and an out-of-state travel screening form upon arrival in Rhode Island. The Department of Health maintains a running list of states with travel restrictions upon entry to Rhode Island. South Carolina As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place. Visit South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control for travel updates and information. South Dakota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in South Dakota, though some routes through tribal lands may be closed. Travelers should check their itinerary on SafeTravelUsa.com and consult the Department of Tourism’s document regarding travel restrictions on tribal lands. Tennessee As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Tennessee. Check with the state’s Department of Tourist Development for updates. Texas As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or mandatory quarantine requirements in place in Texas. Face coverings are required inside public spaces and outdoor areas where social distancing is not possible, and the government encourages travelers to review the health and safety guidance at their destinations. Travel Texas has updates and information. Utah As of November 2, there are no COVID-19 travel restrictions or quarantine requirements in Utah. Visit the state’s coronavirus hub for travel guidance. Vermont As of November 2, travelers to Vermont must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, unless they receive negative PCR test results on or after day 7 to end their quarantine early. For some travelers, quarantining at home before coming to Vermont is an option. See the Department of Health’s website for updates and details on exceptions to the quarantine requirement. Virginia As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for people arriving from domestic or international destinations to Virginia, but masks are required in public buildings for anyone age 10 or older. Visit the Department of Health for travel updates. Washington As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for arrivals to Washington, though people traveling from high-risk areas should quarantine for 14 days. Masks are required in public spaces indoors, and outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. The Department of Health has updates and frequently asked questions. Washington, DC All nonessential travel outside of the DC metro area is currently discouraged, and any nonessential traveler arriving from a high-risk area – with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average – is required to quarantine for 14 days. Travelers from the border states of Maryland and Virginia are exempt from this rule. For the current list of states requiring a quarantine, last updated November 2, visit Destination DC. West Virginia As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in West Virginia. Visit the tourism office’s website for updates and alerts. Wisconsin As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Wisconsin, but the government discourages all travel, including travel within the state and between multiple private homes, and recommends that people practice social distancing and stay home as much as possible. In some counties, there are travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners, so check for for area-specific safety updates, closures, and quarantine requirements before departure. Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services has updates and information for travelers. Wyoming As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place for US travelers in Wyoming. Visit Wyoming’s Department of Health for updates.

    Inspiration

    Best spots for fall foliage out west

    New England gets all the credit. It is known for its seasonal changing of the leaves throughout Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont - and you can find a road trip guide to New England here. But this region is not the only part of the U.S. that cast off different shades during autumn. Here is where to see the best fall foliage in the western states. WEST Arizona Outside of Sedona, Red Rock State Park’s riparian zone of Oak Creek Canyon goes by Fremont cottonwood, sycamore, velvet ash and Arizona alder trees on various trails and the path up to the Eagle’s Nest Trail to get a top-down view. See Slide Rock State Park on the same day; trees there also provide a vibrant contrast against the Oak Creek’s red rocks. Idaho The Boise River Greenbelt is a tree-lined pathway throughout the city and connects walkers and cyclists to its various riverside parks. Or head out on the Sawtooth Scenic Byway, as this Highway 75 rolls north past the Harriman Trail and the Galena Summit Overlook, then on through the resort towns of Hailey, Ketchum, and Sun Valley. Great Basin National Park. Photo credit: Sydney Martinez/Travel Nevada Nevada In Eastern Nevada, the Great Basin National Park encourages you to drive around at your own pace. Its Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive is a paved 12-mile route leading to an elevation exceeding 10,000 feet and views of groves of aspen trees in yellow, red and gold. New Mexico The Santa Fe National Forest Scenic Byway leads to a 13,000-foot aspen filled alpine wilderness, where the hillsides from Hyde Memorial State Park to Ski Santa Fe shine vibrantly gold. Fall colors hit nicely along U.S. 64, across the Carson National Forest between Taos and Chama and through Tres Piedras and Tierra Amarilla, where the view of the Brazos Cliffs is worth the stop. Wyoming Along Battle Pass Scenic Byway, a 57-mile Sierra Madre Mountains of the Medicine Bow National Forest, see the famous strand of trees known as Aspen Alley. Jackson is a gateway to two of the country’s most beautiful national parks – Yellowstone and Grand Teton. Drive along the Cloud Peak Skyway Scenic Byway, the southern-most route across the Bighorn National Forest, for views of the Bighorn Mountains that are framed by yellow- and gold-hued aspens.

    Inspiration

    Checking in on evacuated Peace Corps members

    The call for American citizens to return to the United States came about suddenly and urgently at the beginning of March, 2020. Americans who were working, studying, and volunteering abroad had to improvise logistics to return to the U.S. One notable organization that had a complex issue of safely returning members from more than 60 countries is the Peace Corps. Their struggle and circumstances Many volunteers were evacuated very suddenly with no opportunity to secure stable accommodations or health care upon their arrival home. They were forced to leave the local communities they’d integrated into and grown to love, many in the middle of long term initiatives. Returning home from an extended period of time can always bring feelings of reverse culture shock, especially when serving poverty-stricken or remote communities that many serve in. But especially for these recently evacuated volunteers, returning home to rising COVID-19 rates, vast unemployment, and a sense of instability that resonated from the general public through our political leaders. What are they doing now? Stephanie Erestera, a 23-year-old who had plans to continue her Peace Corps service in the Philippines until September 2020, immediately started searching for work. For the past year or so she’s been an educator and mentor to local teachers, and now faces uncertainty on many levels, though she’s happy she’s able to move back in with her parents for the time being. While she says she knows that it’s not an ideal job market to come back to, especially in her home town of Boise, Idaho, she “feels like it’s like that for a lot of Americans right now”. Unexpected and involuntarily evacuated from Bicaj, Albania, Pawnee Maiden, a 24-year-old volunteer teacher, says she left behind a host family, students, friends, and coworkers that she’d expected to engage with for another year. She’s found the transition experience to be extremely hard and painful but has high hopes that she’ll be able to return and finish her service. Having returned to the DMV area, she’s now focusing her giving heart and love of service to her foster dog, Sherwin. However, not all Peace Corps volunteers are in their 20’s. Adam Greenberg, 34, was volunteering in Zambia with his partner working on sustainable food sources. They had actually considered staying in Zambia instead of returning to the U.S., even if that meant no financial or logistical support from the Peace Corps. However, they ultimately decided that the better decision for Zambia’s infrastructure was for them to return home. Luckily, Greenberg says, they have enough savings to temporarily get by, though he will have to begin looking for work to pay the bills, another hurdle in itself as more than 26.5 million Americans have filed for unemployment since March. Many returned service-people have also found themselves in Tim Feng’s complex situation. Feng, 23, returned to the U.S. from Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand where he served as an educator, but had to consider his high-risk parents in his last-minute planning. For their safety he ultimately decided to quarantine himself in a short-term rental apartment that he paid for out of pocket. Feng would also love to return to his service, but for now he is doing what he can to find stability here at home. He’s spent his time revamping his resume, seeking job opportunities, looking into higher education options, and the like. How Peace Corps volunteers might continue to serve their community The good news for Peace Corps volunteers is that they might be just the perfect people to continue to serve by supporting their fellow Americans. From their international experiences, Peace Corps volunteers are adept at “creating order out of chaos”, as the Women of Color Advancing Peace and Security so eloquently put in their recent returned Peace Corps volunteer study. Returned volunteers have real-world experience in establishing a routine, adapting to drastic change, and have experience coping with isolated/distanced from loved ones for extended time periods. As returned volunteers continue to look toward the future, every day brings news and renewed hope—the Peace Corps recently announced that there will be an expedited application for recently evacuated volunteers who are interested in returning to service that will be announced in early June. Peace Corps Comment When asked to comment, a Peace Corps spokesperson gave the following statement: “The Peace Corps continues to support evacuated Volunteers—providing evacuation and readjustment allowances, a wellness stipend, extended health insurance, health and quarantine instructions and resources, information and webinars for federal government job opportunities, job postings for other private sector positions, and graduate school options. Importantly, Volunteers who were evacuated will qualify for Non-Competitive Eligibility (or NCE), which makes it easier from them to join the federal workforce. They will also qualify for Coverdell Fellowships available for graduate school study. Volunteers who seek to return to their host countries or seek a new assignment will be given expedited consideration over the next year. For more information, please go to https://www.peacecorps.gov/coronavirus/.”

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    DESTINATION IN Idaho

    Cadwell

    Foot roasting is a method of torture used since ancient times. The torture takes advantage of the extreme sensitivity of the sole of the foot to heat. The Romans immobilized the prisoner and pressed red-hot iron plates to the soles of his feet. The Spanish Inquisition bound the prisoner face-upward to the rack with his bare feet secured in a stocks. The soles of the feet were basted with lard or oil and slowly barbecued over a brazier of burning coals. A screen could be interposed between the feet and the coals to modulate the exposure, while a bellows controlled the intensity of the flame. A version that consisted of a chair with an integrated foot stocks was referred to as the Spanish chair, but this is readily confused with the Iron chair. By way of contrast, in the Brittany chair, the coals were held in a movable iron tray which could be cranked upward until it actually made contact with the feet. Added diversions included placing slivers of hot coals between the toes, or suspending the prisoner head-downward and placing hot coals directly on the soles. The destruction of the Order of the Knights Templars is credited largely to foot roasting, which was committed with savagery literally sufficient to drive the sufferers to insanity; to add to the hideous cruelty, many Knights also had their toes denailed.Foot roasting remains a popular technique of torture to this day. During the Cold War, KGB torturers made use of metal clothes irons heated red-hot and applied directly to the naked soles or explored the delicate webbing between the prisoner's toes using either a soldering iron or an electric wood-burning pencil.

    DESTINATION IN Idaho

    Southeast

    Idaho ( (listen)) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It borders the state of Montana to the east and northeast, Wyoming to the east, Nevada and Utah to the south, and Washington and Oregon to the west. To the north, it shares a small portion of the Canadian border with the province of British Columbia. With a population of approximately 1.8 million and an area of 83,570 square miles (216,400 km2), Idaho is the 14th largest, the 13th least populous and the 7th least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The state's capital and largest city is Boise. For thousands of years Idaho has been inhabited by Native American peoples. In the early 19th century, Idaho was considered part of the Oregon Country, an area disputed between the United States and the British Empire. It officially became U.S. territory with the signing of the Oregon Treaty of 1846, but a separate Idaho Territory was not organized until 1863, instead being included for periods in Oregon Territory and Washington Territory. Idaho was eventually admitted to the Union on July 3, 1890, becoming the 43rd state. Forming part of the Pacific Northwest (and the associated Cascadia bioregion), Idaho is divided into several distinct geographic and climatic regions. The state's north, the relatively isolated Idaho Panhandle, is closely linked with Eastern Washington with which it shares the Pacific Time Zone—the rest of the state uses the Mountain Time Zone. The state's south includes the Snake River Plain (which has most of the population and agricultural land). The state's southeast incorporates part of the Great Basin. Idaho is quite mountainous, and contains several stretches of the Rocky Mountains. The United States Forest Service holds about 38% of Idaho's land, the highest proportion of any state.Industries significant for the state economy include manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry, and tourism. A number of science and technology firms are either headquartered in Idaho or have factories there, and the state also contains the Idaho National Laboratory, which is the country's largest Department of Energy facility. Idaho's agricultural sector supplies many products, but the state is best known for its potato crop, which comprises around one-third of the nationwide yield. The official state nickname is the "Gem State", which references Idaho's natural beauty.