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    London,

    Kentucky

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    London is a home rule-class city in Laurel County, Kentucky, in the United States. It is the seat of its county. The population was 7,993 at the time of the 2010 census. It is the second-largest city named "London" in the United States and the fourth-largest in the world. It is part of the London, Kentucky micropolitan area. Of the seventeen micropolitan areas in Kentucky, London is the largest; the London micropolitan area's 2010 Census population was 126,369. London is also home to the annual World Chicken Festival that celebrates the life of Colonel Sanders and features the world's largest skillet.
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    Travel Tips

    Lonely Planet's expert recommendations are coming to Apple Maps

    Lonely Planet has announced plans to provide curated content through a new Apple Maps feature, which was revealed at Apple's annual Worldwide Developer Conference this week. Launching later this year through software updates for iPhone, iPad, and Mac, users will be able to access initial collections for San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles and London. As travel plans remain uncertain, the collections feature solo and outdoor activities that can be enjoyed while national lockdowns lift. They will feature insider tips so users can check out the most iconic architecture, spectacular day hikes and scenic running routes in their destination. Find out where to see street art, like Clarion Alley in the Mission District of San Francisco © Federica Grassi / Getty ImagesThe collections will begin with San Francisco, where travelers can discover the city’s public art and vibrant street murals, its most idyllic parks, and most prized food trucks, all through Apple Maps. From there, the collections will extend to other top cities, where users can learn about New York’s cult-status coffee shops, where to find LA’s finest ice cream shops, or how to enjoy London’s best free experiences. Lonely Planet ✔@lonelyplanet We’re excited to announce our collaboration with Apple Maps. Starting with San Francisco, then followed by other cities, Lonely Planet will offer a series of curated places to help you discover your neighborhood and beyond. Available on the redesigned Apple Maps app this fall. 60 5:30 PM - Jun 22, 2020 Twitter Ads info and privacy “Lonely Planet has always focused on the needs of travelers and we constantly seek ways to improve and ease their experiences. We reach hundreds of millions of travelers each year through our printed guides, online and through our own mobile products and we are thrilled to offer one more way for people to discover the world around them," says CEO Luis Cabrera.

    Budget Travel Lists

    7 affordable alternatives to popular destinations around the world

    Second-city travel refers to cities in a country that don’t come to mind when first planning a vacation. For example, when going to Thailand, tourists typically book a trip in Bangkok, instead of Chiang Mai, a city in northern Thailand. This trend has Americans dodging major cities for their smaller, alluring counterparts that offer lower price tags, fewer crowds (so long, traffic!) and a truly authentic experience. Second cities are not necessarily the second most-populated city in a country – when speaking about the trend in the travel sense, it means any city that might not be the first choice for tourists. So what could be better than a more authentic experience at a more affordable price? Here are seven second-city destinations to consider. 1. Lille instead of Paris, France Paris is a romantic city that foreigners swoon over and for good reason; however, France has countless cities that are more affordable and just as lovely. So skip the hustle and bustle of Paris and travel an hour north to the town of Lille, a cultural hub that sits on the crossroads of Paris, London and Brussels. Don’t worry, the croissants are just as good! Lille has been named a World Design Capital for the year 2020 and is a mecca for not only design, but also a robust food scene, museums and art fairs galore and beautiful modern architecture. With more affordable prices, your hotel stay can get an upgrade to chic Parisian style at MAMA Shelter Lille – a new boutique hotel with a welcoming vibe and a quirky design made for comfort. Plus, just a few steps from the hotel are two major train stations, making it a convenient option for exploring too! 2. Lafayette instead of New Orleans, Louisiana Less than three hours from New Orleans, Lafayette has been dubbed the “Austin” of Louisiana and the true heart of Cajun culture. Food is the heart of Louisiana and music is the soul – and there's an abundance of both in this charming Cajun town. With fresh seafood, jambalaya, crawfish and gumbos, no wonder this town has been dubbed the "Happiest City in America." Anthony Bourdain even visited once, enough said. If you’re coming to party Cajun style, Lafayette has that too. Home to Grammy-winning Cajun musicians, an epic Mardi Gras celebration and famed music halls – you really can’t go wrong with this second city. Plus, lodging is inexpensive with hotels under $100. Now you’ll have more cash for all the mouth-watering restaurants. Bring on the po’boys! 3. Catskills instead of New York City, New York New York City is one metropolis that everyone must visit at least once in a lifetime to experience the glorious city that never sleeps. But what about the rest of The Empire State? The Catskills are a three-hour drive from the Big Apple and offer a peek into the great countryside of New York. Tucked away upstate lays the town of Windham, now a popular ski destination and all-year escape. This area offers a small-town vibe with inviting locals, every outdoor sport you can imagine, local cuisine and quaint hotels worthy of your next Instagram post. Check out the Eastwind Hotel – this cozy, chic hideaway has Lushna cabins (A-frame wooden structures) as well as a wood-barrel sauna and fire pit for après-ski delights. 4. Eilat instead of Tel Aviv, Israel If the crowds in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem are not appealing to you, consider the less-traveled city of Eilat as an exciting Israeli adventurer’s paradise. Located on the southern tip of the country, Eilat offers a sunny oasis on the Red Sea with stunning beaches and jaw-dropping coral reefs. Whether you want to hike the desert mountains, relax beachside or snorkel in its remarkable Coral Reef Nature Reserve, this resort town has it all. Hikers can trek the Eilat Mountains Nature Reserve, which offers some of the most breathtaking views and spectacular desert routes in all of Israel. And now it’s easy to get to, in January 2019, Israel opened the Ramon International Airport, which is a 20-minute drive from the city. 5. Milwaukee instead of Chicago, Illinois Situated two hours north of Chicago and located on the western shore of Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, is a lively urban Midwest city filled with approachable and affordable arts, culture and culinary experiences. And if you’re into beer, this city is for you. Wisconsin is the third-largest producer of beer in the US and Milwaukee is home to Miller Brewing, now MillerCoors, which offers a number of brewery tours and tasting experiences for travelers. Milwaukee’s Historic Third Ward is a must-visit neighborhood that is considered the arts and fashion district – comparable to New York’s Brooklyn neighborhood, but without the crowds. Here you can find the Milwaukee Public Market, which features Wisconsin-made and must-try products like homemade chocolates and artisan cheeses. The Third Ward is also home to some of the best shopping and unique boutiques. 6. Ponce instead of San Juan, Puerto Rico San Juan is most commonly known as the hub for Puerto Rico’s vibrant culture, but, guess what? This extends beyond the metro area and throughout the entire island. Puerto Rico’s second-largest city is Ponce, known as “La Perla del Sur” (Pearl of the South) due to its location in the southern region of the island. With towns that maintain remnants of colonial life under Spanish rule, beautiful historic buildings and cultural attractions, Ponce is overflowing with rich history and culture. Immerse yourself in Ponce’s art scene at the Ponce Museum of Art – boasting over 4,500 European works of art. Or if you’re an explorer, take a ferry boat ride to Isla Caja de Muertos off the coast of Ponce, where you go hiking or simply relax in the turquoise water. 7. Spokane instead of Seattle, Washington Skip Seattle and head straight to Spokane. Located in eastern Washington, Spokane has everything Seattle has (except the Space Needle, of course), but on a smaller scale. Unlike its counterpart, Spokane is affordable and sunny. Plus, the city has a symphony, shopping, great theater, an exciting culinary scene – with 21 wineries and 40 craft breweries – that can rival Seattle and all the urban entertainment you could ask for. In addition to city culture and urban delights, Spokane is an outdoor recreation dream with five ski resorts and two state parks located right in Spokane. With 17 direct flights and over a hundred daily flights, it’s actually easy to get to Spokane. So what are you waiting for?

    Budget Travel Lists

    7 of Europe's Best Winter Celebrations and Festivals

    Europe is one of the most enchanting places to visit during the winter and holiday season. With its winding streets filled with glimmering lights and decorations, friendly locals and endless tables of holiday treats and gifts for sale, who can resist? If you’re planning a festive break, here are some of the best Christmas markets, celebrations and festivals to look for across the pond. Just don’t forget to leave space in your suitcase for all the souvenirs and gifts you’re going to buy! London, England Running for more than a decade, London’s Winter Wonderland exudes Christmas spirit through the city during the winter. The attraction hosts Christmas-themed fun and activities, including an enormous ice skating rink, rollercoaster rides, street food stalls, a Ferris wheel, a Bavarian-themed beer hall with live music and a huge Christmas market. Looking for a hotel near the Winter Wonderland? The Crowne Plaza London is a 20-minute walk from the festivities and a five-minute taxi ride to the shops and restaurants in Mayfair and Knightsbridge. Amsterdam, Netherlands The Amsterdam Light Festival is known near and far as one of the best winter events in Europe. In December and January, around 250 light installations of all shapes and sizes are on display illuminating the town. This all happens in the city center along the waters of Amsterdam’s canals during the dark winter months. Preparations for the exhibit go on the entire year, so you can imagine how magnificent the displays are. Lights adorn everything from the bridges to the trees and beyond. Take a canal boat for a magical look at all of the light art in the evening. It will be a highlight of the season. Strasbourg, France Opening at the end of November, the festive Strasbourg market is a favorite for Christmas lovers with its four Advent converts and Living Nativity, along with authentic live music. Having first launched back in 1570, travelers come from around the world to visit this magical place! Experience all that it has to offer, from its famous Christmas tree and scenic wooden chalets to the delicious mulled wine. If you’re looking for lodging, consider the Holiday Inn Express Strasbourg, an adorable hotel in the city center and only a short stroll away from the Christmas market. San Sebastian, Spain Move over Christmas markets. San Sebastian’s Tamborrada de Donostia, aka festival of drums begins on January 19th at midnight when the flag of San Sebastian is raised and signifies the start of the celebration. Thousands of locals and tourists gather in the city center to sing, dance, play drums and march for the next 24 hours. The festival is free and open to anyone to attend, but as with any festival the area is extremely busy. Many locals go out for a seafood dinner to celebrate the city, so make your reservations for dining and lodging ahead of time. Munich, Germany Head down the cobblestone streets of Munich to witness the Christmas spirit at the famous holiday markets. Various markets pop up throughout the city, but Marienplatz is the legendary one everyone visits, right in the heart of the city. You can expect a massive Christmas tree decked out in holiday garb; stalls galore filled with handmade trinkets and you may even catch carolers singing. Well, let’s be honest – you’ll definitely see carolers in this jolly town. Bergen, Norway There’s a gingerbread town in Norway, tell all of your friends. But seriously, the world’s largest gingerbread town is constructed every year in Bergen. Students and volunteers put together a full town composed of houses, boats and cars. There’s even a Ferris wheel made of cookies and icing. When do we get to eat it? Visit the mini version of Bergen from mid-November through December for around $10. Plus, there are a variety of Christmas markets throughout the town, so you can combine your tour with a visit to shop until you drop. Warsaw, Poland The post-card perfect market within Warsaw’s Old Town walls is home to more than 60 traditional wooden huts. They’re nestled among the snow and sell traditional mulled wine, adorable figurines and basically everything you could ever want to remember this fascinating city by. And if you’re looking for a white Christmas, it’s almost guaranteed in Warsaw. There are a variety of markets throughout the city that are either traditional or modern, but you’re guaranteed to find what you’re looking for during the month of December. So, grab a few pierogies and maybe some vodka and get in the holiday spirit Polish style.

    Inspiration

    World's First Cheese Conveyor-Belt Restaurant Lands in London

    Billed as the world’s first cheese conveyor-belt restaurant, Pick & Cheese comes courtesy of the Cheese Bar team and opens its doors on 7 September in Seven Dials Market, a new food hall in Covent Garden. “We’ve been looking for the perfect spot in the West End for a while now,” says founder Matthew Carver. “We think this style of cheese and wine bar will work so well here – it’s the perfect stop for a pre-theater snack or to refuel after a hard days’ shopping.” Dairy-lovers can belly up to the bar, where spots are first-come, first-served, and spend an hour choosing from cheddar, Stilton, Gouda, and more as they whizz around the 40-metre belt. (“Cheese should always be served at room temperature,” says Carver.) Plates are color-coded by price, so you barely have to think before you grab, say, a £2.95 Mayfield cheese from East Sussex’s Alsop & Walker or a £6.10 bresaola made in Tottenham. With more than 25 varieties sourced from all over the UK, you might be tempted to try one of each. Carver recommends the Kingham, a brand new cheese released this summer that’s served with walnut fudge for a classic salty-sweet combination; Londonshire, from Wildes Cheese just up the road in Tottenham, that’s being paired with honeyed garlic; and Beauvale, “a blue for people who ‘don’t like blue cheese,’” with house-made sticky pear jam. “Over the years, we’ve built up a repertoire of our favorites, and have been waiting for the perfect chance to put them on our menu,” Carver says. “We’ve tried to cater to the more well-known flavor profiles, as well as trying to push people out of their comfort zone to try something new.”As for the conveyor belt itself, it’s been a few years in the making, but it was always part of the plan. “In our Camden restaurant, our customers always want to pick different cheeses from our house list, and create their own bespoke cheeseboard,” Carver says. “We wanted to come up with a way to offer this, whilst showcasing the cheeses at their very best.”

    Inspiration

    The Beatles Tour of Liverpool: Penny Lane to Cavern Club

    The Beatles had a worldwide influence, and there’s no shortage of places to follow in the footsteps of John, Paul, George and Ringo. Hamburg’s Reeperbahn is where the Fab Four honed their skills; New York has the Ed Sullivan Theater; and of course, London has Abbey Road Studios and its iconic crosswalk. This itinerary takes in all the top sites, exploring the birth places of John, Paul, George and Ringo. "There are places I’ll remember…" John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr are celebrated all over the city, but perhaps nowhere as much as the banks of the River Mersey. Start your tour on the waterfront, where a larger-than-life-size statue of the lads is nestled in the shadow of the iconic Royal Liver building, between the Titanic Memorial and Museum of Liverpool. From there, it’s just a few hundred feet to the Royal Albert Dock. This UNESCO World Heritage site is now an immensely popular multi-use tourist attraction which includes the Fab4 Store, the Fab4Cafe and the Beatles Magical Mystery Tour. But the biggest attraction is The Beatles Story, perhaps the best Beatles-only exhibition in the world. The museum is chock full of objects and memorabilia, as well as a children’s discovery zone. It’s the perfect place to start your exploration. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images "Get back to where you once belonged…" The Beatles grew up in separate parts of Liverpool, so you’ll want to take a bus to do most of your touring. Ringo grew up at 10 Admiral Grove in the Dingle area, in a row house that was slated for demolition a few years ago until the public outcry put an end to those plans. George was the only Beatle who wasn’t born in a hospital—he was born in his childhood home at 12 Arnold Grove (a name he used as a pseudonym later in life) in Wavertree. Paul’s musical family lived at 20 Forthlin Road in Allerton. When the guys skipped school to play, they sometimes practiced at John’s house "Mendips," located at 251 Menlove Ave. in the Woolton area. John’s guardian, his Aunt Mimi, didn’t like it much ("The guitar’s all right for a hobby, John, but you’ll never make a living at it," she once said). Still, the semi-detached house with the sunny entryway was centrally located and probably the nicest of all the houses. Now it’s an English Heritage site. In fact it was close to Mendips—at St. Peter’s Church, on Church Road—where John’s skiffle band The Quarrymen was playing when he was introduced to Paul McCartney on July 6, 1957. Paul was a better musician than most of the guys in the group, and it wasn’t long before John invited him to join. A short time later, they changed their name to the Beatles. Speaking of names, there’s a gravestone in the churchyard with the name Eleanor Rigby. Inspiration, or coincidence? Mirrorpix / Getty Images "Listen to the music playing in your head…" The Beatles played all over the city before hitting the big time. The Casbah Club (tours available by appointment) was a coffee shop in the basement of original drummer Pete Best’s house at 8 Hayman’s Green in West Derby, and a frequent haunt for the band. The "Rainbow Stage" they played on there was little more than a nook. It’s a far cry from the Litherland Town Hall, where Beatlemania probably began. Now it’s a health center on Hatton Hill Road, but in 1961 it was where the band played its first gigs after returning from Hamburg—and quickly established they were the best draw in the city. Of course, the most iconic site—indeed, it could very well be the most important and famous music venue in the world—is the Cavern Club. The Beatles played the stifling cellar at 10 Mathew Street a staggering 292 times and it was here they were discovered by manager Brian Epstein. In fact, Mathew Street is the center of the Beatles experience for any visitor to Liverpool. In addition to The Cavern, there’s a statue of John Lennon, a couple of Beatles-themed bars, gift shops and tours, as well as The Grapes—the pub where the boys drank between sets at the alcohol-free Cavern. Jim Dyson / Getty Images "Penny Lane is in my ears and in my eyes…" You don’t have to dig too deep to find the places that had the most direct inspiration on The Beatles’ music—they’re name-checked in some of the band’s most famous songs. For instance, Penny Lane is a real street in Liverpool. Where it meets Smithdown Road, there really is a roundabout with a bus stop shelter in the middle (in fact until recently the "shelter in the middle of the roundabout" was a Beatles-themed bistro). There’s even a barber shop on one side of the square. If "Penny Lane" was Paul’s typically rose-colored look back at the places and people who filled his Liverpool childhood, for John it was bittersweet nostalgia inspiring "Strawberry Fields Forever." The song was named for a Salvation Army orphanage in Beaconsfield Road—just around the corner from Mendips. John and his friends would play in the wooded grounds, and they became a place of freedom and imagination. The old building is long gone, but the wrought-iron gates are still there and have been attracting Beatles fans for generations. Jim Dyson / Getty Images Make the Beatles tour of Liverpool happen It doesn’t get much better for a Beatles fan than Hard Day’s Night Hotel, with sculptures of the lads on every corner of the façade and more than 100 individually-designed rooms (all with Beatles themes, naturally). It backs directly up to Mathew Street, for easy access to the Cavern and other sites. The YHA Albert Dock hostel is a budget-friendly option with a Beatles theme as well. To get around, pick up a reloadable Walrus Card from Merseytravel for easy and inexpensive bus access. If you want to leave the planning to someone else, try the Beatles Fab Four Taxi Tour.

    Travel Tips

    Perfecting the Stopover: How to Turn a Layover into A Playover

    If you book flights online, you’ve no doubt noticed that itineraries with one or more connections are usually cheaper than direct flights. Most airlines fly between destinations through one or several hub cities, following a “hub and spokes” model. For example, New York (JFK) is a hub for American Airlines and Delta Airlines, while Paris is the hub for Air France. What if, instead of wasting several hours in an airport waiting for a connecting flight (known as a layover), you decided instead to explore a new city for a few days? You could cross one more place off your bucket list, while spending less on the flights than if you were flying direct. Spending one night or more in a destination on the way to another is called a stopover. It’s a little trick that lets budget-savvy travelers visit two destinations for the price of one. What are good stopover destinations? While a good stopover is anywhere you would like to explore, New York City, Reykjavik, London, Paris, Tokyo, and Singapore are all popular choices. Although they are expensive places to visit, stopping for a few days in one of those cities could give you a taste without spending a fortune. Several national airlines offer deep discounts on hotel nights and attractions in their hub city through airline stopover programs. These programs also let you stop over for no (or little) extra airfare. Stopover in Singapore For example, Singapore Airlines gives you a hotel stay in Singapore, admission to over 20 attractions, and restaurant deals for as low as SGD 63 (USD 46) for your first night. If you’re planning to travel in Southeast or South Asia, multi-cultural Singapore makes a wonderful introduction to the region with its clean streets, delicious (and perfectly safe) street food, funky modern architecture, and shopping. A trip to Seljalandsfoss Waterfall in Iceland © Marie-France Roy / Budget Travel Stopover in Iceland Iceland has become immensely popular in recent years. Although it’s a pricey destination, some of the cheapest flights from North America to mainland Europe touch down here. Icelandair let’s you stop in Reykjavik for up to seven nights at no additional airfare. From the capital, it’s easy to arrange day trips to the geysers, glaciers, and waterfalls that make Iceland unique. Winter affords a chance to see the northern lights, while in summer the sun barely sets. Stopover in Istanbul Turkish Airlines flies to more countries than any other airline via Istanbul, a fascinating and very affordable stopover. Depending on your departure and arrival point, the airline may also give you a free hotel night. Let the bazaars, palaces, mosques, and museums dazzle you, but if you have a sweet tooth, don’t leave without visiting a pudding shop! Other destinations with airline stopover programs include Helsinki, Lisbon, and Montreal, as well as Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and Doha on the Arabian Peninsula. How to book a stopover First, start with an aggregator such as Skyscanner or Kayak to see a selection of flights to your primary destination. Find those with the cheaper prices; they’ll likely involve a connection in another city. If one of those cities looks appealing, do a multi-city search on an itinerary that stops there for one night or more. Note how the price compares to the original return flight price. Also do this search on the airline’s own website, which may give you the option of adding the stopover on its booking page. If the new price is quite a bit higher, you may need to call the airline and ask if you can get a “free” stopover. The national airline of the stopover country is your best bet in this case (for example, Icelandair for Reykjavik). While you’re on the airline’s website or talking to their agent, find out if they have an “airline stopover program” as described above, before making your decision. With enough time, you could even include two stopovers in different cities, one in each direction. Another method is to fly to the stopover city with the national airline, and then book a separate flight on a discount airline to your final destination (or vice-versa). Make sure to check different date combinations for optimal pricing. Columns inside the Blue Mosque in Instanbul © Marie-France Roy / Budget Travel Why is including a stopover often cheaper than flying direct? In the mysterious world of airfare pricing, several factors can explain this price difference, but in the end, it’s always about the airline wanting to fill those seats and maximize revenue. Competitiveness is likely one of the main reasons. On international flights, only two airlines normally fly direct between two hub cities: the airlines of the respective countries. Meanwhile, several additional airlines link them with a connection through their own hub, increasing competition and making connecting flights cheaper. Demand is also a factor, since many of us are often willing to take less convenient connecting flights in order to save money. Five extra tips for saving money on your stopover Tip #1: Find out if you need a visa for your stopover country. For citizens of US and Canada, many countries are visa-free or offer visas on arrival. Others have cheaper transit visas for short visits. China even offers visa-free stays of up to six days. Tip #2: Try not to arrive late at night to facilitate transfers and avoid expensive airport taxi fares. Many cities have affordable airport trains or shuttles that run during the day and evening. Tip #3: If you’re only staying for one night, look into a walking tour to get local insights and see as much of the city as possible within a short time. Some walking tours are “free” (tip-based). Tip #4: Changing money always comes with fees, and figuring out exactly how much you need for a short stay is difficult. Some places like Reykjavik accept credit cards for everything, so you don’t need local currency. Research this ahead of time, but carry some US dollars that you can exchange in a pinch. Tip #5: If you’re using a loyalty program to book a reward flight, you may still be able to add a stopover without spending extra miles or points. This may require calling an agent instead of just booking online.

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