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    Marion,

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    Marion is a home rule-class city in Crittenden County, Kentucky, in the United States. It is the seat of its county. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,039.The farm communities surrounding Marion are home to a large Amish population. The Marion-Crittenden County Airport is located west of the city.
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    10 wild and tasty North American food trails

    Eating locally is a delicious way to enjoy your travels. But some corners of the United States and Canada offer more direct routes to falling for regional fare: food trails. Sure, there are food trails that are familiar for their states. (We’re looking at you, Wisconsin Cheese Tour and New York’s Buffalo Wing Trail!) This list, on the other hand, will direct you to 10 food-loving paths where eccentric and scrumptious tastes converge. 1. Cajun Boudin Trail, Louisiana Southern Louisiana serves up several culinary-trail choices, which take travelers along the I-10 and LA-90 corridors for specialties like gumbo, jambalaya, alligator, and crawfish. But even more homegrown is the Cajun Boudin Trail, centered around Lafayette. Pronounced “boo-dan,” boudin is a sausage filled with meat, rice, and herbs that’s served across bayou country. The boudin trail will lead you to markets and restaurants to taste the best locally made links – plus other savories like fried boudin balls, cracklin (fried pork skin), smoked meats, and more. Bonus: Visit in October and fill up at Lafayette’s annual Boudin Cookoff. 2. Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail, New Mexico You may wonder what’s so special about a burger topped with cheese and chiles that it’s earned its own food trail. One bite of this juicy New Mexican specialty, however, should answer your question. When it comes to the magical flavor formula of salt, fat, acid, and heat, the Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail has it all (including plenty of other chile-licious dishes). Navigate with the state-wide interactive map to tickle your taste buds with green-chile burgers from Taos down to Las Cruces. 3. Country Ham Trail, Kentucky You wouldn’t be wrong to think of Kentucky for its Bourbon Trail or even its Fried-Chicken Trail. But the simply delicious Country Ham Trail is the state’s showcase for producers who have been curing ham for more than a century (sometimes inside bourbon rickhouses, for even more local flavor). Better still, visit the trail in September as it leads to Marion County’s annual Country Ham Days food and music festival. 4. Nova Scotia Chowder Trail, Canada Atlantic Canada is easily one of the continent’s best seafood regions. And while the Lobster Trail is sure to impress travelers, Nova Scotia’s Chowder Trail leads to nearly 60 unforgettable chowder houses across the province. Let the interactive map guide you to the best bowls from Halifax to Cape Breton and beyond, and don’t forget your “chowder passport” to earn stamps along the way. 5. Tehama Trail, California Northern California is famous for wine. But drive north towards Redding and Shasta Cascade to discover the riches of the Northern Sacramento Valley along the Tehama Trail – where olives and olive oil are beautifully cultivated. Starting from the town of Corning, the trail leads to some of America’s best olive farms, many of them with tasting rooms to sample artisanal oils, vinegars, and all manner of olives. Don’t miss the region’s honeys, pies, fresh produce, and, of course, spectacular wines. 6. Lowcountry Oyster Trail, South Carolina Come for the scenery, stay for the sea-to-fork riches. The famous bivalves of South Carolina’s coastal Lowcountry region anchor this oyster trail, where travelers can sample every type of preparation – from fried to Oysters Rockefeller to raw on the half-shell. Find a handy map with suggested itineraries on the Lowcountry Oyster Trail site, covering oyster farms, shucking facilities, and oh-so-many great seafood restaurants, some serving oyster-loving craft-beer and wine pairings. 7. Richmond Dumpling Trail, British Columbia, Canada Neighboring Vancouver is the city of Richmond, where Asian cuisine is abundant, and so delicious it may be the best on this side of the Pacific. Dumplings stand out in particular, making the official Richmond Dumpling Trail one of British Columbia’s gastronomic highlights. With the help of the trail website, you’ll learn about types of dumplings, best times of day to enjoy dim sum, and which restaurant-crawl itinerary is going to lead to the most satisfying dumplings for your eager chopsticks. 8. Fruit Loop, Oregon For 35 miles, travelers to Hood River County can get loopy tasting the natural bounty of 17 farm stands, 10 wineries, three cideries, six berry farms, and two lavender farms. They’re all on the Fruit Loop, which marks its 27th anniversary in 2020. Download a map for easy touring by car or bike, then plan to take in the seasonal produce and year-round bites and beverages found only in central Oregon. Pick up a brochure at any site, get stamped at 14 farm stands, and get a Fruit Loop bag to help tote your edible souvenirs. 9. Tenderloin Trail, Indiana Save your calories for this Hamilton County food trail, showcasing a mighty indulgent staple of the Hoosier State. Behold the tenderloin sandwich, composed of an oversized slice of pork that’s been pounded, breaded, and deep fried, and usually served on a comically small bun with burger fixings. (You can try grilled too, but why would you?) With the help of the trail’s online map, you can try more than 50 restaurants serving up this Indianan classic, and print your own Tenderloin Trail passport for July’s annual Tenderloin Tuesday specials. 10. A to Z Foodie Trail, Iowa Pella, Iowa, may be a small town, but its bursting with tasty delights. So many that the region offers an A-to-Z Foodie Trail to showcase 26 different dishes and drinks unique to Marion and Mahaska Counties (southeast of Des Moines). The trail is a top tourist activity, guiding hungry travelers to sample a bevy of local foods, from apple pie at Pella Nursery and gouda cheese curds at Frisian Farms; to pigs in the blanket at Vander Pleog Bakery and Yoga Poser Pale Ale at Nocoast Beer Co.

    Inspiration

    Take a Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Tour at These Real-Life Locales

    Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the hit show from Amazon Prime Video, not only fueled nostalgia for 1950s New York City, it brought us to vintage Paris streets and summers in the Catskills. Now, with the premier of season 3, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is taking her show on the road. Want to follow along? Here are some of the key locations you can visit right now from the Maisel universe. The Gaslight Cafe – NYC For her first comedy set, Mrs. Maisel drunkenly stumbles into the cellar of a West Village comedy club and speakeasy she frequented with her philandering husband. And though there was a bar called The Gaslight in the Meat Packing district which recently closed after 21 years, the Gaslight Cafe at 116 MacDougal St. was shuttered in 1971. An underground home for creativity of all types, it hosted the likes of Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan, who recorded a live album there in 1962. The interior shots were filmed inside a studio in Brooklyn, but you can visit the exteriors at 97 St Mark’s Place in the East Village. Old Town Bar – NYC This Flatiron gem, Joel Maisel’s favorite hangout, is one of the oldest bars in the city and serves one heck of a cheeseburger to boot. If the prohibition-era marble-topped bar could talk, it might decide to take the fifth, but the vintage restrooms kind of say it all. An eclectic crowd of tried and true New Yorkers mingle with tourists and everyone enjoys watching the waiters serving food delivered on the dumbwaiter. See it at 45 E. 18th St. The Maisel Apartment – NYC The Upper West Side is Midge’s playground, and her parents’ opulent Manhattan apartment is filmed inside The Strathmore at 404 Riverside Drive, Apt 3N, overlooking the Hudson River. The building itself dates to 1909, is constructed of brick, limestone and terra cotta, and is located in Morningside Heights, closer to Columbia University (where Marion’s father, Abe, teaches) than the Museum of Natural History. B. Altman – NYC When Midge decides to make her own cash so she can spend nights killing it on the mic, she gets a job at this classic, now defunct, department store. The original, landmarked, building still stands nearly unchanged at 65 Fifth Avenue, though it’s now the Graduate Center for the City University of New York. Pop around the corner to the 34th St. entrance to witness the show’s exact shot, but sadly, you won’t be able to purchase any lipstick. The inside scenes were shot inside the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, a former bank in Brooklyn. Chez Paul – Paris When Mrs. Maisel and her father hoof it to Paris to convince Rose Weissman to come back to New York, they take a family meal in this sweet bistro at 13 rue de Charonne, Bastille in the eleventh arrondissement. The romantic, turn-of-the-century décor and checkered tablecloths highlight the classic French menu, like the perfectly cooked steak au poivre, gratin dauphinois, and of course the steak tartar - which sadly goes uneaten in the scene. Madame Arthur – Paris After wandering the City of Lights, Midge stumbles into this drag cabaret, which is exactly what it is in real life. Located at 75bis rue des Martyrs, 18th arrondissement, Madame Arthur has hosted bohemian luminaries such as Pablo Picasso and Toulouse-Lautrec and now presents upscale drag shows in two different theaters every night. After the cabarets, the space turns into a club which stays open until 6am. Steiner Resort – the Catskills Back from Paris and ready for some relaxation, the Weissmans and the Maisels head to the Catskills — with manager Susie not far behind. Just a few hours drive from Manhattan, this New York State mountain range was labeled the Borscht Belt and hosted a certain pair of dirty dancers back in the day. Scott’s Family Resort, on Oquaga Lake, stood in for Steiner Resort and still offers access to the same summer cottages, ballroom and even bowling alley that the gang frolicked in onscreen. Plunger and romper not included. The Rockaways – Queens When Susie is kidnapped for cash by two mobsters, they drag her kicking and kind of screaming to the Rockaways, a NYC beach area in Queens known for its surfing, tacos and cheap beer. Of course, everything turns out OK on the subway ride, once the goons realize Susie also grew up there. You can follow in their footsteps by catching the A, J or Z trains to Rockaway Boulevard, or hopping on a NYC Ferry to Rockaway Landing. The Cedar Tavern – NYC When Midge starts dating the handsome bachelor, Benjamin, she is sucked into the New York art scene when they visit this dive bar. Known for its weekly salon for artists, The Cedar Tavern moved twice since it opened in 1866 and shuttered for good in 2006. The scene was actually filmed in McSorley’s, a similarly old-timey bar at 15 E 7th St. near University Place. Here you can toss peanut shells on the floor and order sloppily poured mugs of just two types of beer, light and dark. Sadly, if this were really where the two lovebirds came to mingle, they would never have made it inside – McSorley’s didn’t allow women until 1970. Miami Beach – Miami We haven’t had a ton of spoilers for season 3, but we do know that Susie and Midge head to Miami and have the pleasure of staying at the horseshoe-shaped Fountainebleau. A beachfront resort built in 1954 with a massive pool, Versailles-like gardens and swinging scene, it was luxury incarnate and favored by celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Judy Garland and even Elvis, and still enjoys a retro, sherbet-colored vibe today. Its Mid-Beach location has become more popular with the opening of other high-end resorts like the Soho Beach House and The Confidante. Las Vegas Other than the occasional crumb dropped by producers on Instagram, we don’t know much about the locations in Vegas, but we do know This Is Us star Sterling K. Brown joins the crew as a straight-talking manager and we do see some marquees mocked up with Maisel. Other than that, you’re just going to have to tune in on December 6th to find out if what happens in Vegas…well, you know the rest.

    Inspiration

    Locals Know Best: Charleston, South Carolina

    Ten years ago, when Yuriy Bekker moved to Charleston from Brooklyn, he was hit by a bolt of culture shock. But it didn’t take too long for the violinist and principal pops conductor of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra (not to mention artistic director of various music festivals and groups and globe-trotting performer), to realize that although there was more sunshine and tranquility and fewer bagel shops as well as Ukranian restaurants like the ones he grew up frequenting as the son of immigrants from Minsk, Belarus, he could feel quite at home in this jewel of a city, where cosmopolitan energy fuses with a laid-back southern attitude and European charm. FEED YOUR BODY, FEED YOUR SOUL The Charleston Symphony Orchestra’s concert hall, Gaillard Center, recently underwent a $140 million renovation. Performances typically start around 7.30PM and he’s usually well on his way home around 9PM. That’s pretty much dinner time, as any New Yorker will tell you. Yuriy prefers not to eat before a performance (even veterans have nerves), so afterwards he heads to 39 Rue de Jean, located just two blocks from the performance hall and known for serving food late-night. The mussels, which are flown in daily from PEI, and French onion soup are his no-fail choices. Charleston is widely known as a walkable city, so it’s easy to spot new joints that frequently pop up. Mercantile and Mash, a relative newcomer that opened in an old cigar factory, quickly became a regular hangout for him and his wife. The artisanal food market, which includes a saloon-style whiskey and beer bar, is a go-to for the house-smoked meats and a top-notch weekend brunch that’s still undiscovered by the masses. It’s located in an area of the peninsula where there’s a bustlng farmers market known for selling local crafts alongside the produce and other food. It's every Saturday from April through November, One of Yuriy’s habitual stops is Roti Rolls, a food truck that serves Indian-style rotis with local ingredients and clever names. (See: the "Mother Clucker") Of course, having been in town for a decade now, he’s well versed in the old-school eateries that make Charleston a legendary foodie destination. When it comes to getting his fix of the classic flavor of the South, he hits High Cotton for what he deems the best shrimp and grits in town, though he also sings the praises of Hominy Grill, a much better known tourist draw. There’s often a wait, but it’s worth it, he assures.  A MECCA FOR MUSIC Visitors to Charleston who love classical music are in for a treat. The symphony has two different programs—a pop series of four annual concerts, each of which delivers orchestral versions of familiar tunes, and Masterworks, which features some of the most iconic pieces of classical music, or as Yuriy explains them, “the true reason for the art form.” The CSO makes it easy for everyone to access this exquisite beauty with the launch of CSOgo, a rather revolutionary and budget-friendly way to see performances. A monthly membership is $35, and it allows you to attend any performance with best day-of seats as well as chances to attend social events, making it an exciting option for wallet-watching travelers who don’t want to commit to buying tickets in advance. That means if you're in town for a few days, you can go to several performances for less than the cost of a week of lattes. When Yuriy isn’t performing in grand concert halls, you might spot him playing music elsewhere around the city. In a clever partnership with the world-class Gibbes Museum of Art, there’s an ongoing series, Rush Hour Concerts, in which a string quartet from CSO plays music somehow related to the art in a featured show. Culture buffs would be well served to coordinate their visit to the museum with one of these chamber music performances.  Of course, when a musician isn’t performing, there’s a good chance you’ll find him out listening to others perform. He likes to take in the local jazz scene at Charleston Grill, which also happens to be one of the best restaurants in town with a fun bar to go with it.  Speaking of bars, the Rooftop Pavilion Bar in the Market Pavilion Hotel is probably one of the best spots for a late-night outing. From several stories above the street, you can gaze out at the water and city landmarks, even in the winter, when heat lamps keep it cozy and classy. Across the street, is The Watch: Rooftop Kitchen and Spirits, an ultra-hip and more lively and rambuctious rooftop hangout, at The Restoration, a boutique hotel. MAKE A NIGHT OF IT Charleston has become an increasingly popular destination over the last few years and as a result, the downtown has a serious hustle and bustle vibe and a parking situation that’s increasingly reminding Yuriy of New York City. John’s Island is a growing community with a great deal of development that makes a fine alternative for a night out, but James Island, located next to it and just seven minutes from downtown Charleston, is where Yuriy and his wife go when they’ve got time to relax. They’ll catch a movie at Terrace Theater, which sells wine and ice cream, before grabbing dinner nearby, either tacos and tortas at Zia or craft beer and modern pub grub (lamb burger, anyone?) at Maybank Public House. DAY TRIPPER Charleston is as much of destination for nature lovers as it is to city slickers. When he has time to escape for the day, he’ll set off to gorgeous Kiawah Island, a small island with landscapes that vary from woodlands to beaches. Yuriy speaks from experience when he says it’s easy to lose the day here amid the tangle of bike trails. There’s also a multitude of waterways, which is “a world in its own,” he says, so you could rent a kayak and explore for hours. This island has a place of distinction in the annals of American musicals: George Gershwin spent summers and it’s known to be his inspiration for “Porgy and Bess.” WANDER So much of Charleston’s exquisiteness lies in the detail, and the best way to take it all in is on foot. “There’s 18th century architecture but there’s also palm trees. It has a European charm, but you can’t compare it to anyplace else. Maybe the South of France? But it really has its own identity,” Yuriy says, noting the iconic sloped porches with ceilings traditionally painted blue. He has a route he regularly strolls, one that gives a sweeping, comprehensive lay of the land. It starts at Marion Square, where the giant farmers market takes place. When it’s in season, he has his “eye-opener” roti from Roti Rolls, the aforementioned food truck, and coffee from Charleston Coffee Roasters, a local outfit that sells its brew both in super markets and at a nearby stand, then stroll north to John Street (off King Street) to Macaroon Boutique, which sells what Yuriy declares the best croissants—homemade, of course.   From there, he strolls south down King Street, a boulevard lined with boutique stores, and hang a left on Market Street, an historic strip that's been the site of a market since the early 1800s. Today Charleston City Market is all slow old-world charm (see: people stationed outside making sweetgrass baskets) with a thoroughly hip vibe. Then it’s a right on East Bay, a strip that runs along the water and is home to the sleek Market Pavilion Hotel and the Old Exchange Building as well as historic Rainbow Row, a series of quaint colorful Georgian row houses where fishermen lived in the early 20th century. At the end of East Bay, you end up at the tip of the city’s peninsula where the pretty White Point Garden with views that invite lingering: From the water’s edge you can spot James Island, Mount Pleasant and the historic Fort Sumter, where the Civil War started, in between. That course lets you see lots of the city’s greatest architectural hits, including many historic churches, but Charleston is a city where there are tons of surprises around every corner. “Wander off on a small cobblestone streets and take a moment to get lost. They’re cobblestone streets and they’re lined with old homes. Just wander around, look, and enjoy. Eventually you’ll  hit a main street, so you won’t be lost for long.”

    Inspiration

    Contrarian Tours of Washington, D.C., New Orleans, Houston, and New York City

    Gross National Product's Scandal Tours Members of the comedy troupe GNP expose the Capitol's seamier side by regaling tour-goers with cheeky, costumed impersonations and sordid tales of politicians from George Washington to George W. Bush. First on the bus route is the Watergate Hotel, naturally, followed by the Kennedy Center (a easy segue to extramarital affairs and conspiracy theories), the Vista International Hotel where former D.C. mayor Marion Barry was arrested on drug charges, the Willard Hotel where Ulysses S. Grant dubbed those pestering him in the lobby "lobbyists", and more sights that are prime fodder for poking bi-partisan fun. "There's a constant supply of new material," quips GNP member John Simmons. Gross National Product, 202/783-7212, gnpcomedy.com/scandaltours; $30, $20 for students and seniors; reservations required; Saturdays at 1 P.M. Hurricane Katrina: America's Worst Catastrophe; City Disaster Tour In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, tourism-starved New Orleans has spawned two narrated bus tours of its ravaged neighborhoods and the uncomfortable concept of disaster tourism. The operators, Gray Line New Orleans and Tours by Isabelle, were driven largely by the need to revive their businesses and to inform visitors. The three-hour Gray Line tour passes a breached levee, the Superdome, Canal Street, the New Orleans Convention Center and the Lakeview area, where the company's vice president Greg Hoffman and many others lost homes. Isabelle Cossart's "City Disaster Tour" is slightly longer and more expensive. It begins in the French Quarter, and covers many of the same sights along with the badly hit St. Bernard and New Orleans East districts. Both highlight the area's history and development, and offer personal takes on the hurricane's timeline. (Passsengers are not allowed to exit the Gray Line motorcoach during the tour, and photography is discouraged.) Gray Line New Orleans, 800/535-7786, graylineneworleans.com; $35, children 6-12 years of age, $28; $3 donated to one of five local non-profit organizations; 9 A.M. and 1 P.M. daily. Tours by Isabelle, 877/665-8687, toursbyisabelle.com; $49 per person; 8:30 A.M. and 1 P.M. daily, provided there are at least four passengers Lifestyles of Houston's Rich and Infamous: The Enron Tour Yankee Sandra Lord has been leading tours of her adopted Houston since 1988, and the latest riffs on its greatest homegrown scandal: the rise and meteoric fall of Enron. While founder Kenneth Lay and chief executive Jeffrey Skilling pass the time on trial for fraud at a local courthouse, the curious can hop a bus for a five-hour, lighthearted look at offices, churches, restaurants, and jails they and other employees have frequented. Lord weaves together facts, anecdotes, biographical information, and historical precedent—a view of the 1928 Kirby Mansion calls for a quick lesson on Houston's first tycoon, John Henry Kirby, an oil man who went down in a high-profile bankruptcy. Discover Houston Tours, 713/222-9255, discoverhoustontours.com ; $30; public tours in Mar.-Apr. 2006, ongoing private tours available Surveillance Camera Walking Tours Each of the Surveillance Camera Players' walks begins with a general introduction on the workings and evolution of surveillance cameras, and then zeroes in to identify numerous often-discreet cameras in a single Manhattan neighborhood—some have close to 400! Far from spouting a left-wing screed, the Players present their findings and encourage healthy debate over the pros and cons of our increasingly public lives. Take a peek at their hand-scrawled online maps of cameras in Times Square and other neighborhoods. Surveillance Camera Players, 212/561-0106, notbored.org; free; Sundays at 2 P.M.

    Inspiration

    Charleston: A Walking—and Eating!—Tour

    Come hungry. Charleston, S.C., is a town that likes to eat well. The downtown has a variety of options—Mexican, sushi, Korean, Mediterranean, Thai, Italian, delis, burgers—and range from pizza joints catering to the student crowd to fine dining. But when I'm in Charleston, I like to explore local twists on standards of South Carolina Low Country cuisine. Like fried green tomatoes. At Jestine's Kitchen, a casual eatery reproducing the recipes of Jestine Matthews, who lived to 112 and worked for 70 years with the restaurant owner's family, the lightly battered fried-green tomatoes ($5.25) are served piping hot and have a lemony flavor. Don't leave Jestine's without trying the melts-in-your-mouth, sticky sweet Coca Cola Cake, $5.95 (251 Meeting Street, no website, no reservations). Nick's Barbecue—along with huge portions of good pulled pork, brisket, and chicken, topped either with a vinegary barbecue sauce or a smoky hot habanera sauce—serves fried green tomatoes with a thick cornmeal crust heavily seasoned with salt and pepper. Delicious. My husband's favorite, though, was Nick's sweet potato pecan pudding, a side dish that could easily be dessert (nicksbarbq.com, lunch for two about $25). Shrimp grits are another staple of Low Country cuisine and are perfectly seasoned at Anson, an upscale splurge. Prepared with shrimp stock, tidbits of bacon and bacon drippings, sprinkled with scallions and roasted tomato, every bite was heavenly. A diner at the next table so enjoyed tasting her daughter's shrimp grits, she persuaded her daughter to swap entrees (ansonrestaurant.com, dinner for two, with wine & dessert, about $120). No surprise that grits are widely available, and even at a no-nonsense diner like Sweetwater Café, the cheesy grits are a bowlful of comfort food at $5.99 (but skip Sweetwater's biscuits, which seemed straight from a supermarket). Great fresh seafood is a Charleston tradition. The culinary emphasis of Fish is no secret. While it offers a variety of French/Asian fusion, a popular dish is the Naked Fish, the catch-of-the-day prepared simply with olive oil, salt, and pepper, to showcase its freshness (fishrestaurantcharleston.com). Or go early for the Fish happy hour specials, beginning at 4:30 pm. Fortunately for those of us who love to burn calories almost as much as we love to eat, Charleston is also a walking city. On three visits, I've never rented a car, since the airport is an easy taxi ride ($14 to share a van, about $38 for a taxi) and downtown Charleston is pedestrian-friendly. Pack comfortable walking shoes to fully appreciate the architectural splendor of the area South of Broad Street. It is a neighborhood of 18th- and 19th-century mansions located close to one another, close to the waterfront, and within walking distance of the downtown shopping and dining area. Many houses have two story open-air porches, called "piazzas," situated to capture the prevailing breezes. Many houses have carefully cultivated gardens that can be glimpsed behind elaborate wrought iron gates. A handful, such as the Edmondston-Alston House (edmondstonalston.com), are open for tours by local docents, who can tell you about the family, the furnishings, and the architecture. Downtown Charleston is also home to the lovely historic campus of the College of Charleston, where you can stroll the brick walkways and admire the architecture and trees draped in Spanish moss. The campus welcomes visitors and offers student-guided tours, a map for a self-guided tour, and even a downloadable app for a self-guided tour (cofc.edu/visit). The Charleston City Market is four blocks of covered, open-air buildings, where local artisans sell pottery, wood carvings, soaps, wearable art, and other crafts. At the Market or on the sidewalk in front of the federal courthouse, you might see weavers turning sweet grass into baskets, and selling them on the spot. You can window shop at the many art galleries, upscale retailers like Jill St. John, or mid-price chains such as Urban Outfitters, or visit Butterfly (butterflyconsignments.com), a consignment shop filled with deals on fashion-forward women's clothing. For a free rest stop for tired feet, try people-watching from a plush chair in the lobby of the Embassy Suites hotel, the pink fortress-like structure that formerly housed the Citadel Military College and where some guest rooms feature gun ports (embassysuites3.hilton.com). Or cross Marion Square, a welcoming public park that hosts a farmers market on Saturday mornings, and find a comfy chair in the grand lobby of the Francis Marion hotel, built in 1924 and extensively renovated in 1996. If you stay at the Francis Marion, a weekend getaway package offered until December 2014 includes $50 per night of certificates for the hotel restaurant, The Swamp Fox, or for any participating restaurant on Upper King Street, most located within easy walking distance of the hotel (francismarionhotel.com). Nightlife on upper King Street has picked up in recent years, and now features lively upscale lounges with dress codes and lines that spill out onto the sidewalk. The bars' success has caused some tension with their neighbors over limited parking and the noise of patrons leaving at the 2 a.m. closing time. On every visit to Charleston, I am again struck by the friendly service. And that unpretentious hospitality is another draw for a lovely walkable city with great food. Sarah Ricks is a Clinical Professor at Rutgers Law School—Camden and a lifelong travel junkie.

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    Best Super Bowl Recipes from Top Travel Destinations!

    If you're invited to a Super Bowl XLIX get-together this Sunday, or throwing one yourself, you know there's more than just one game going on, right? The real smackdown is: Who is going to bring the most awesome food? Well, our friends at three of America's most popular travel destinations have shared their recipes and each of them is a touchdown! "NOT FROM" BUFFALO CHICKEN MAC N CHEESE The Sea Crest Beach Hotel in North Falmouth, Massachusetts, is one of our favorite ways to do Cape Cod, with perfect Silver Beach right outside your door, indoor and outdoor pools, amazing restaurants, and even some budget room options. Executive Chef Daniel Kenney serves up an imaginative riff on hot wings, including some locally sourced New England ingredients for you Patriots fans, to serve your football friends (and frenemies). Yields 6 servings Ingredients: 1 pound of boneless and skinless free-range chicken thighs 1 pound orecchiette pasta 1 quart fresh heavy cream 1.5 cups shredded white cheddar, Vermont 1 cup crumbled Great Hill Blue Cheese, Marion Mass. 1/2 cup goat cheese, Hubbardston Mass. 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese 1 cup smoked bacon 1 cup Frank's Hot Sauce 1 cup panko bread crumbs Cracked white pepper Sea salt 2 cups corn oil 1 bunch fresh thyme 3 each fresh bay leaves 3 cloves garlic Preparation: Begin by covering the chicken thighs with the corn oil in a small baking dish, add thyme, garlic, and bay leaves, and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cook on a low temp (275˚F) for approx. 2 hours or until the chicken is fully cooked and fork tender (internal temp must reach 165˚F). Chill the chicken in the baking dish until fully chilled, then shred the chicken into bite size pieces and set aside. Bring 2 gallons of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta until al dente (approx. 7 minutes). Drain and chill the pasta and set aside. In a large heavy pot, place the cream and bring to a simmer and reduce slightly, then add the cheeses (reserve a small amount of each cheese for topping the mac n cheese later). On low heat melt the cheeses and then whisk together until the cheese and cream have emulsified and set aside. Take the bacon and cook in oven until crispy and golden brown. Remove from the oven and chop the bacon into bite size pieces, set aside. Mix together the bacon, cheese sauce, shredded chicken, pasta and hot sauce and place in a baking dish, top the mixture with the remaining cheeses and sprinkle with panko bread crumbs. Bake in a 350˚F oven until golden brown and the center is piping hot, serve immediately with a chilled Sam Adams Beer. HAM AND JAM SLIDERS                                                                              Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain is an extraordinary getaway in Arizona (home of this year's big game). Executive Chef Beau MacMillan's sliders are a tasty timeout treat. Yields 12 servings Cheddar Biscuits Ingredients: 2 cups all-purpose flour 3 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. baking soda 1 Tbs. freshly cracked black pepper 1/2 tsp. Kosher salt         2 tsp. salt 1 cup + 2 Tbs. buttermilk 5 Tbs. unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 1 cup finely shredded cheddar cheese 1/4 cup chopped green onion, including tender green tops Preparation: Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, black pepper and kosher salt until well mixed. Mix in butter until pea-sized. Add cheddar cheese and green onion and stir and toss lightly to combine. Stir in 1 cup buttermilk until the mixture forms a soft, slightly sticky ball. With lightly floured hands, divide the dough into 12 equal portions. Form each portion into a rough ball and place on an ungreased baking sheet. Space the balls about 1-inch apart. Brush the tops with the remaining 2 tablespoons buttermilk. Bake at 350˚F for 15 to 18 minutes, until the tops are golden brown. Red Pepper Jelly Yields 2 1/8 quart Ingredients: 3 large red peppers, seeded and sliced 3/4 cups cider vinegar 3 cups sugar 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 1/2 package Certo liquid pectin Place peppers in a food processor and process until coarsely chopped, but not pureed. Place chopped peppers in a large bowl with cider vinegar, sugar, salt and crushed red pepper flakes. Mix well. Put mixture in a large pot and bring to a boil. Add Certo and continue to cook at a slow rolling boil for 35 to 40 minutes, until you can "drag" a spoon around edges of pan or until it passes the jelly test coating the back of the spoon or dripping from spoon very slowly. Snake River Farms American Bone in Ham  Ingredients: 1 large Snake River Farms American Bone-in Ham Preparation: Heat oven to 275˚F. Place ham in a roasting pan and cover loosely with aluminum foil. Heat for approximately for 12-15 min. per pound. When center of ham reaches 125˚F allow the ham to rest for 15-30 min. Keep covered with foil while resting. Assembly Slice biscuits in half and rub with a generous portion of red pepper jelly. Slice ham thinly and place in between biscuit halves. Enjoy! CHOCOLATE-COVERED FOOTBALL STRAWBERRIES 3800 Ocean at Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach, FL, is a luxurious way to chill by the ocean, and Pastry Chef Brittani Szczecina has whipped up an appropriately football-inspired dessert that will leave you and your pals feeling anything but deflated! Yields 12 pieces Ingredients: 12 each fresh strawberries 1 package white chocolate 1 package dark chocolate Preparation: In a microwave safe bowl melt dark chocolate Holding by the stem, dip strawberry in chocolate, shake off excess and place on parchment paper Let the chocolate pool onto the paper and then pick strawberry back up and place in new spot. This helps to avoid little "feet" to form. Continue with remaining strawberries and let harden. Melt the white chocolate. Fill a piping bag and cut a very small hole. Pipe a vertical line down the entire length of the strawberry. Let harden. Once hardened, pipe five horizontal lines to form the threading on the football and let dry.  

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