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    State of Kentucky

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    Kentucky (kən-TUK-ee, UK: ken-), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered by Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north; West Virginia and Virginia to the east; Tennessee to the south; and Missouri to the west. The northern shape of the Commonwealth is defined by the Ohio River. Its capital is Frankfort, and its two largest cities are Louisville and Lexington. The state's population in 2020 was approximately 4.5 million.

    Kentucky was admitted into the Union as the 15th state on June 1, 1792, splitting from Virginia in the process. It is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on Kentucky bluegrass, a species of grass found in many of its pastures, which has supported the thoroughbred horse industry in the center of the state.

    The state is home to the world's longest cave system in Mammoth Cave National Park, as well as the greatest length of navigable waterways and streams in the contiguous United States and the two largest man-made lakes east of the Mississippi River. Kentucky is also known for horse racing, bourbon, moonshine, coal, "My Old Kentucky Home" historic state park, automobile manufacturing, tobacco, bluegrass music, college basketball, Louisville Slugger baseball bats, Kentucky Fried Chicken, and the Kentucky colonel.

    Find more things to do, itinerary ideas, updated news and events, and plan your perfect trip to State of Kentucky
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    Inspiration

    The best books to read in every state in America

    As soon as coronavirus arrived in New York City last winter, my brain became a tangle of anxious thoughts, pounding down on my already overtaxed amygdala. I had one salvation: a three-by-two map of America hanging in my living room. While most of my friends set their sights on the Balis and Bermudas of the world, my only travel goal has long been to visit every state in America. Ostensibly, this map’s point was to be the canvas for a smattering of pins until I created a multi-hued distribution upon all 50 sates. In actuality, the point was to accomplish something, to wrangle up America into a palm of pastel thumbtacks, to live a life full of stories. Stories from a life of zigzagging our great terrain this past year, it turned out, would not be in the cards as travel restrictions and lockdowns made all too clear from the outset of this mess. But as I squinted once again at the pin-less sweep of real estate on my wall somewhere between Minnesota and Oregon early last spring, I realized I could still get to work on these travels, if I got a little creative. Thus, my 50 states book project was born, where I embarked on a challenge to read a tome set in every state in the union. I still met people and places and things and disasters and triumphs, but I didn’t rent a car, or hop on a plane, or even scour the internet high and low for Clorox wipes to sanitize my hotel room. Instead, I let William Least Heat-Moon, Bill Bryson, and Paul Theroux lead me on road trips, I hung out with that guy who walked across America, Peter Jenkins, I chased redbirds in Kentucky with Sharon Creech, listened to crawdads singing in North Carolina, and I went on one hell of a bender with Hunter S. Thompson in Vegas. I spent a grand total of $233.96 buying used books on Amazon—less than an average one-night hotel stay in Chicago, mind you. I read classic texts and obscure novels, fiction and nonfiction, humorous and heartbreaking, and it completely changed the way I think about travel. For one thing, given the titles I read, I can now unequivocally say the best adventures are the outdoors ones. My nationwide literary adventure had me walking around my own little nook of a park, Sutton Place Park in Midtown Manhattan, like I was a Thoreauvian naturalist (I’m not sure how he’d feel about the giant neon Pepsi Cola sign across the East River). In lockdowns, these books gave me inspiration to find meaning in the toughest of days knowing that This Too Shall Pass, and the road awaited me. It even helped me feel a little less pissed when my well-intentioned best friend would send me gorgeous mountain-y snapshots from her quarantine castle in the Hudson Valley. After all, I had just gotten back from a whirlwind stint in Iowa. Perhaps counterintuitively, surveying a book from every state in America blurred the lines of my much-loved pushpin map. Alaska was Alabama was Kentucky was Kansas. On page 18 of my Michigan selection, The Deer Camp: A Memoir of a Father, A Family, and the Land That Healed Them by Dean Kuipers, I came across this passage: “The great American anarchist Edward Abbey is probably not a terrific role model for mature relatedness—by all reports, he had prickly relationships with other people and, like Henry David Thoreau, needed the solitude he so extolled. But in Desert Solitaire Abbey addressed that need to confront our position vis-à-vis the nonhuman world…” In a quick swoop of the pen, my Michigan author had referenced my Maine essayist and my Utah wordsmith. We’re all independent, yet linked. Separate, yet dependent. Alone in the woods, yet with your friends on the forest floor. Alaska is Alabama is Kentucky is Kansas. Alabama Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep Cep does a deep dive into Harper Lee’s true-crime book about reverend Willie Maxwell, an alleged serial murderer that never was finished and published. Her portrait of To Kill a Mockingbird’s scribe, Harper Lee, is just as fascinating as the unreal story of Maxwell. Alaska Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer There’s hardly a stretch of 10 pages in this book without creased corners and underlining, in this enthralling account of a renegade college grad who abandons the conventions of traditional life on Alaska’s harsh frontiers. Arizona Arizona Then and Now: People and Places by Karl Mondon By the time I got to my Arizona selection, my eyes had glazed over from so. much. text. Thankfully, this assortment of archival photos from the Jeremy Rowe Collection juxtaposed with modern-day photography from Mondon was exactly what I needed. Nothing will beat the heavenly Grand Canyon, but the main street photos of towns like Bisbee and Winslow really made me nostalgic for wandering a new teeny town’s downtown for the first time. Arkansas Hipbillies: Deep Revolution in the Arkansas Ozarks by Jared M. Phillips Hippies of the Haight-Ashbury variety + backwoods hillbillies = “Hipbillies.” A fascinating perspective on this Southern counterculture from the 1960s and ‘70s, I was intrigued to learn about these back-to-the-landers’ incredible impact on the future of the Ozarks. California The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan Head to San Francisco in this award-winning gem from Tan that also brings you along to China in stories of immigrant Americans, the lives and pain they left behind, and the chapters they’ve built anew. Colorado The Voyeur's Motel by Gay Talese A journalist uncovers a heck of a world after receiving an anonymous letter from a peeping Tom who owns a hotel in Aurora and spies on unknowing guests. It’s creepy, it’s can’t-put-down, and it will definitely have you look around extra carefully after you check into a hotel room. Honorable mention: Stories I Tell Myself: Growing Up with Hunter S. Thompson by Juan Thompson Connecticut The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin Well, guess I need to see the 2004 movie starring Nicole Kidman now. Because, wow, what a book: When Joanna arrives in Fairfield County with her husband and kiddos from New York City an American horror classic ensues, from the same author as Rosemary’s Baby. Delaware And Never Let Her Go: Thomas Capano: The Deadly Seducer by Ann Rule This book has something for every kind of reader, true crime, politics, superb research, psychological nuances...the list goes on and on. You’ll stay up way past your bedtime finishing this one. Florida Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh Woman decamps from her busy life and heads to Captiva Island, off the coast of Fort Myers. Woman picks up various seashells and uses them as metaphors to reflect on life: work, relationships, struggles, joys. Turns out said woman is married to a Nazi (see: New Jersey), which ruins this poetic, rhythmic philosophical missive for me. Georgia Between Georgia Torn between two families, a husband and a best friend love interest, the tension is palpable in this Southern Drama with a capital D. As one reader referenced in the Amazon reviews, the saying "We don't hide crazy in this family. We sit it down on the front porch and give it a cocktail” was just made for this book. Hawaii The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings You know a book is that good, when the George Clooney movie version doesn’t even hold a candle to it. There’s a wife in a coma and her extramarital affair, a husband forced to reckon with raising his two daughters alone and being heir to a ton of primo real estate, and so much more that will leave you unable to think about anything else for a couple of days. Idaho Idaho by Emily Ruskovich I’ll be the first to admit I picked this book up for the eye-catching floral design on the cover, but I couldn’t put it down for the pathos bleeding through every page. When a mother kills her child, so much more crumbles and is lost, but the beauty here is in all that is found, practically, philosophically, and otherwise. Illinois Searching for John Hughes by Jason Diamond When I was an editor at Men’s Journal in 2016, I sat in the cubicle next to Mr. Diamond (remember these things called offices) and this book encpatures so much of who he is: wise, writerly, idiosyncratic, and a touch grumpy. Enjoy the ride as he commences a quest for the filmmaker behind Home Alone, Sixteen Candles, and National Lampoon’s Vacation. Indiana The Fault In Our Stars by John Green I’m still crying, but to be fair, how could you not be crying after reading this novel about two kids who love like there are thousands of tomorrows despite the terminal cancer diagnoses with which they’re both reckoning. Iowa The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid by Bill Bryson 1950s-era Iowa is brought to life in this oft humorous memoir from the beloved travel writer. It really made this New York City kid feel like she was missing out on a quintessential childhood experience by never having attended a county fair. Kansas In Cold Blood by Truman Capote A true crime classic that revolves around the brutal slaying of four family members in a small town in Western Kansas and the detective work that ensues. The book was praised for utilizing novelistic techniques to describe the characters and their feelings, a trailblazer for the nonfiction genre. Kentucky Chasing Redbird by Sharon Creech Lockdowns have had me returning to tween books (don’t judge me), and I don’t regret the walk down memory lane in the least, especially in the company of the protagonist Zinny. The industrious youngster sets out into the woods and grapples with grief, blossoming love interests, and frustrating family dynamics along the way. Don’t we all? Louisiana Magic City by Yusef Komunyakaa Step inside 1950s Louisiana in Komunyakaa’s hometown of rural Bogalusa in this harrowing collection of poems. Within, the talented poet tackles racism, sexuality, and economic inequalities with a swift, vivid hand. Maine The Maine Woods by Henry Thoreau What I would give to escape this city jungle and take a walk in the Maine woods right about now. Thankfully, Thoreau’s quintessential naturalist account of three trips into the rugged woods with philosophical musings intertwined with the detailed physical descriptions of all that Thoreau witnesses. Pretty foreboding for the mid1800s: “the mission of men there seems to be, like so many busy demons, to drive the forest out of the country.” Maryland Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler Admittedly, I picked up this book because there was a tantalizing slice of pie on the cover. But I’m glad I did: Follow along for all that unfolds as one grieving Baltimore family learn about long-hidden truths and struggles to cope. Massachusetts Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom I mean, what can I say about Tuesdays with Morrie? In this blockbuster memoir-cum-biography, a journalist visits his beloved former college professor at home as he dies of ALS. A five-star book (albeit, with some four-star writing). A beautiful biography of a life well lived, and a workaholic writer who’s outlook is changed because of his inspiring teacher’s example. Michigan The Deer Camp: A Memoir of a Father, A Family, and the Land That Healed Them by Dean Kuipers It was easy to fall in love with Kuipers’ elegant prose in a story about an estranged father and his three sons and what happens when said absent dad tries to make amends after buying 100 acres of hunting property in middle-of-nowhere Michigan. It’s a memoir I know I’ll be recommending for years to come. Minnesota Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich I had picked this book up because I was supposed to gather with a crowd of hundreds to see Erdrich speak at the 92nd Street Y this past month. Needless to say, that blessed packed auditorium never came to fruition, but I’m glad I still devoured this spooky, powerful account of a pregnant woman in a world where expecting mothers are held captive in hospitals. Honorable mentions: Freedom by Jonathan Franzen; The Good Girl by Mary Kubica Mississippi The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner I did it. I read a full Faulkner book. And while I probably would have understood more about this Deep South family and Dilsey, their black servant, had I read the SparkNotes, if only for the occasional heart-stopping quote like “Clocks slay time... time is dead as long as it is being clicked off by little wheels; only when the clock stops does time come to life.” Missouri The Broken Heart of America: St. Louis and the Violent History of the United States by Walter Johnson This Missouri native and now Harvard professor captures the oft overlooked history of St. Louis, tracing the city from Lewis and Clark’s 1804 expedition to modern times, with moving examples in each chapter. It’s a tough look at racism in our country from centuries past to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson in 2014, but a look well worth taking. Montana A River Runs Through It and Other Stories by Norman Maclean So far, I’ve lost one friend to Big Sky Country since lockdowns commenced, and I can now totally appreciate why. Penned by a retired English professor who commenced his fiction career at 70, this novella and accompanying short stories will have you eager to fly-cast and play cribbage amidst a backdrop of trout streams, drunkards, and whores (maybe not the whores). Nebraska The Swan Gondola by Timothy Schaffert Venture to the 1898 Omaha World's Fair – filled with sinners and saints – as one ventriloquist stumbles upon a new love. The book has burlesque dancers, snake oil salesmen, and plenty of wild west drama and romance. In these strange times, what more could you want? Nevada Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson Like The Plot Against America (see: New Jersey) I didn’t think this stream of conscious book would be for me, so I was amazed that I polished it off in three evening reading sessions. Vegas is wild, life is wild, and it’s all gravy baby in this fast-paced (psychedelic) trip. New Hampshire Last Night in Twisted River by John Irving If this doesn’t make you want to traipse around New Hampshire (minus an accidental murder and an unfortunate sheriff), I don’t know what will. The inventive novel takes detours to Iowa, Vermont, and more, as you get to know three generations of men and a rotating cast of women and feel particularly drawn to say goodbye to your smartphone for a while and retreat to 1950s Coos County, New Hampshire. New Jersey The Plot Against America by Phillip Roth In this lengthy novel, Roth reimagines a world in which Nazi sympathizer Charles Lindbergh is President, creating fantasized historical fiction that has striking parallels to today’s dystopian America. The book focuses on Philip’s upbringing in Newark in the 1940s in a tight-knit Jewish community, with a brother desperate to leave and a cousin returning home from World War II missing a leg. Overall, this book a nice reminder for me that reading beyond your typical wheelhouse pays dividends. Check out the miniseries on HBO Max after you’re done. Honorable mention: Shore Stories: An Anthology Of The Jersey Shore by Richard Youmans (Editor) New Mexico House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday After I told a friend in California about my little project, I was touched when this book arrived in my mailbox a few days later. This Pulitzer Prize novel by esteemed Kiowa journalist moved me in all the right ways during such a time of turmoil with the unforgettable Abel, a Native American man who returns to his reservation after fighting in World War II. New York The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger In a time when it was easy to forget New York City’s boisterous splendor, it was comfort food to cavort around famed landmarks and reconvene with old Phoebs, Holden, and even pimply Ackley. As for “those ducks in that lagoon right near Central Park South,” I’m pleased to report they appear to be COVID-free and frolicking about even as hell and temperatures freeze over. Honorable mentions: A Walker in the City by Alfred Kazin; Here Is New York by E.B. White; Manhattan’45 by Jan Morris; An Unwanted Guest by Shari Lapena; The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America by Russell Shorto North Carolina Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens A haunting murder story with unforgettable characters, a moving love story, and evocative descriptions of nature’s wonders, all set in the marshlands of the Old North State. North Dakota The New Wild West: Black Gold, Fracking, and Life in a North Dakota Boomtown by Blaire Briody Part culture analysis, part travelogue, this book about the oil biz delivers on the premise of its title — especially on the wild front. Ohio Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance From page one to the end, try putting this book down as it simply yet poignantly captures the realities of growing up in a family riddled with addiction and drama. P.S. If you watched the stekkar new Netflix flick, you’ll definitely appreciate reading the original memoir. Oklahoma A Map of Tulsa by Benjamin Lytal Dubbed “a love letter to a classic American city,” this love story in a Tulsa that straddles the line between dusty and sparkling is unlike any other you’ve ever read. Oregon Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed Okay, so it also covers California and Washington, but since the author lives in Portland, we’ll give this unique, achingly beautiful memoir to her stomping grounds. Chronicling one woman’s quest to hike the PCT in the cradle of grief, this memoir will change your outlook on everything from nature to family. P.S. Reese Witherspoon stars in the 2014 movie adaptation. Pennsylvania Rabbit, Run by John Updike This was the first Updike book I read, but it won’t be the last. I think one Goodreads reviewer nailed it: “Have you ever seen something noted because it is a representation of a specific thing? For example, a building might be marked with a plaque as a perfect representation of a type of architecture. Well, this book should be marked with a plaque as a perfect prose example of America in the late 50s/early 60s.” It wasn’t pretty, it wasn’t progressive in its treatment of women, but man was it enthralling. Rhode Island The Islanders by Meg Mitchell Moore Get to know Anthony, Joy, and Lu, three strangers whose lives become intertwined on Little Rhody’s picturesque Block Island. They may call it a summer beach read, but I call it cozy quarantine perfection. South Carolina The Last Original Wife by Dorothea Benton Frank Set in Georgia and South Carolina, its a low-country love story that will leave you feeling Hallmark movie good. Also, the descriptions of towering trees, Sullivan’s Island, and Charleston restaurants, will help you indulge the armchair traveling spirit we all need right now. South Dakota Deadwood by Pete Dexter When the going gets tough, the tough head to Deadwood...at least in the 1870s if you’re Wild Bill Hickok or Calamity Jane. Expect searing grit. Booze, sex, betrayal, and murder in an action-packed work of fiction you won’t soon forget. Tennessee Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver A searing fictional narrative that grapples with the effects of climate change and draws you into the world of a young woman living on a farm in an isolated sliver of Tennessee. If you’re a lover of the mystical monarch butterflies, this is definitely for you. Texas God Save Texas: A Journey Into the Soul of the Lone Star State by Lawrence Wright Diverse chapters covering everything from hurricanes and guns to music and Texan heroes, get a taste of this big, beautiful, and oft contradictory state. (Which, by the way, is so much more than Austin) Utah Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness by Edward Abbey This best-seller reminded me of the understated, almost eerie grandeur of Utah (I once took a SUP yoga class in thermal waters within the Homestead Crater, a 10,000-year-old crater, about a half-hour outside of Park City, if that’s not enough trendy activities rolled int one) — and had me itching to return. Through Abbey’s elegiac prose, sourced from journals and reflections of his time spent as a ranger at Arches National Park outside Moab, you’ll yearn for the day when you can visit all of the natural wonders he describes for yourself, and with new eyes. Vermont Stranger in the Kingdom by Frank Mosher It’s a real treat to get lost in fictional Kingdom County, Vermont, in this tale that centers around a small town, a murder, and life in New England. Dealing with difficult themes like racism, Mosher manages to weave in humor and moral lessons without being preachy. Virginia The Jezebel Remedy by Martin Clark What happens when a married couple who are partners in law in a small Virginia town encounter a mysterious death of their most eccentric clients will leave you surprised at each twist and turn. One of my first quarantine reads last spring, it’s a veritable page-turner and welcome distraction from the relentless news cycle. Washington Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson (Spoiler alert!) The last line of this courtroom drama regarding a case of a drowned fisherman on remote San Piedro Island was well worth slogging through the entire book for me: “Accident ruled every corner of the universe except the chambers of the human heart.” West Virginia Last Mountain Dancer: Hard-Earned Lessons in Love, Loss, and Honky-Tonk Outlaw Life by Chuck Kinder This Goodreads review just about summed it up: “At turns uproariously funny and break-my-goddamn-heart sad, Last Mountain Dancer started off good and ended even better, set in a world where Hank Williams occupies the same spiritual space as the ubiquitous Jaaaaaysus.” Suffice to say, I’m looking forward to the day when I get to visit these country roads for myself. Wisconsin Population: 485 — Meeting Your Neighbors One Siren at a Time by Michael Perry I’ve visited my fair share small towns in Wisconsin like outdoorsy Door County’s fly-speck gem, Sister Bay, and Elkhorn to see the Dave Matthews Band play the much-hyped amphitheater that is Alpine Valley, but I’ve never ventured to one quite like Perry’s hometown of New Auburn, rendered beautifully in this unforgettable memoir. Wyoming Wrapped and Strapped by Lorelei James I like Harlequin romance novels, so shoot me. Hippie vegetarian meets hunky cattle farmer in a raunchy stint at the ole Split Rock Ranch and Resort in this “Blacktop Cowboys” series mass market paperback hit. Now I definitely want to visit Wyoming for the, um, scenery.

    Inspiration

    Cruise Along These Holiday Lights Drive-Throughs Across The U.S.

    As the current pandemic is changing how we celebrate the 2020 holiday season, the tradition of seeing public holiday lights displays at night can now be done from the safety of your car. From readapted walking tours to first-time happenings or continuing events, here are holiday lights drive-throughs around the U.S. to take a ride-along. Check their websites for tickets and health and safety protocols before attending. New England Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay has reimagined its annual Gardens Aglow as a drive-through event happening now through Jan. 2. The gardens will still dazzle with over 650,000 environmentally-friendly LED lights depicting trees, animals, flowers, and other delights. Plus, they’ve all been designed by the gardens’ staff. Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, R.I. is hosting its first Drive-Through Holiday Lights Spectacular now through Jan. 10. The inaugural spectacular features festive larger-than-life luminous displays and over 1.5 million illuminated lights. Now through Jan. 2, the Magic of Lights at the Toyota Oakdale Theatre in Wallingford, Conn. is presenting the latest LED technology and digital animations in this holiday experience. Now through Jan. 3, the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Concord is holding the “Gift of Lights,” a 2.5-milelong drive-through show with 3.5 million lights, a new 150-foot RGB Tunnel of Lights, and characters from popular children’s books. There are also fan-favorite displays, including the 12 Days of Christmas scene. Hershey Sweet Lights, presented by T-Mobile. Mid-Atlantic “Wegmans Lights on the Lake” at Onondaga Lake Park in Liverpool, N.Y. is happening now through Jan. 10, and is a two-mile route featuring towering holiday displays, a larger-than-life land of Oz, twinkling fantasy forest, Victorian villages and a variety of animated scenes. Located down the road from Pennsylvania’s Hersheypark Christmas Candylane, ”Hershey Sweet Lights presented by T-Mobile” is happening now through Jan. 3 and consists of two miles of fields and wooded trails decorated with nearly 600 illuminated, animated displays created from about two million LED lights. Through Jan. 3, “Bayport Credit Union Holiday Lights at the Beach” is Virginia Beach Boardwalk’s festive nautical holiday lights display featuring festive fish, musical crabs, and elves join a surfing Santa and a new 40-foot dancing Christmas tree. Southeast At Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., “Speedway Christmas” is happening now through Jan. 17 and has more than four million LED lights in displays along a 3.75-mile stretch. This event also has holiday movies shown on a large HDTV screen Thursdays through Sundays. For an additional fee, attendees can skate on a 5,400-square-foot ice rink; mask-wearing is required. In Columbia, S.C., the South Carolina State Fair is putting on “Carolina Lights” at Lexington Medical Center Fair Park at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds now through Dec. 27. More than 100 individual LED light displays along a mile-plus stretch including a nativity scene and a 25-foot-tall Frosty the Snowman. In Savannah, the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens’ “December Nights & Holiday Lights” has been turned into a drive-through event, on now through Christmas Eve. Now through Jan. 2, “Jax Illuminations” will feature two mega trees, a 300-foot tunnel of lights and custom Christmas scenes at the Morocco Shrine Center in Jacksonville, Fla. Through Jan. 2, the Pinnacle Speedway in Lights at the Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee spread across a four-mile route illuminated by more than 2 million lights among 250 displays. In Nashville, at the Nashville Fairgrounds Speedway, the Jingle Beat is designed by the same artists and local creatives that behind some of the music industries biggest tours. This light show is helping to support the local music industry that has been decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Southern Lights Holiday Festival at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington is a three-mile driving tour full of a lot of twinkling lights, happening now through New Year’s Eve. “Santa Claus Land of Lights” at the Lake Rudolph Campground & RV Resort. Photo by Eric Scire. Mid-West Billed as Central Ohio’s largest drive-through Christmas light show, Wonderlight's Christmas at the National Trail Raceway in Hebron is now through Jan. 3. It has over one million LED lights synchronized to traditional and contemporary Christmas music played through your own car stereo. “Santa Claus Land of Lights” at the Lake Rudolph Campground & RV Resort in the (fittingly called) Santa Claus, Ind. happens now through Dec. 27. The story of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is depicted through lighted displays and storyboards. Now through Jan. 3, “Illumination: Tree Lights at The Morton Arboretum” in Lisle, Ill. has guests remaining in their cars and tuning to a synced musical soundtrack while driving nearly two miles among the Arboretum’s trees. The Wisconsin Christmas of Carnival Lights in Caledonia, 20 minutes south of Milwaukee at Jellystone Park™ Camp-Resort, features over two million twinkling lights on an over 1.6-mile path. Now through New Year’s Eve, the show allows attendees to experience lights on all sides, with displays ranging from forest friends and reindeer to Santa and his elves. South-West “Lights of Joy” in Branson, Mo. is located off of the Shepherd of the Hills Expressway and contains more than 300 displays with over one million twinkling LED lights throughout this 1.2-mile drive. The Automobile Alley Art Light Display in Oklahoma City has colorful LED lights covering buildings on eight blocks of North Broadway and district side streets. Various shops and restaurants will also feature window displays. The event is part of Downtown in December and runs now through Jan. 31. “Gift of Lights” at Fort Worth’s Texas Motor Speedway now through Jan. 3 is made up of over one million twinkling lights that people can see from their own cars. Lights at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Photo by Gabe Ginsberg West “Christmas in Color” at Bandimere Speedway in Morrison, Colo. is having drivers cruising along more than 1.5 million lights perfectly synchronized to holiday music heard through your car radio. Drive by giant candy canes, snowmen and more now through January 3. The Las Vegas Motor Speedway’s “Glittering Lights” features more than five million LED lights intertwining throughout a 2.5-mile course through the speedway, through Jan. 10. The Phoenix Zoo’s Cruise ZooLights can be seen from your car now through Jan. 31, with millions of twinkling lights and dazzling animal sculptures from the comfort of your vehicle. Now through Jan. 2, “Holidays in Your Car” is taking place both at the Del Mar Fairgrounds in San Diego and Ventura County Fairgrounds, with more than 1 million LED lights and some fixtures standing at 40 feet tall.

    News

    What countries can US travelers visit right now?

    Editor's Note: This list was updated on October 20, 2020. Please check specific country sites for the most updated information before booking travel. In August, the department returned to its previous system of "country-specific levels of travel advice", which means it's back to rating individual countries from levels 1-4 based on their current health and security situations. The decision was made in line with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and advisories are updated regularly as situations evolve quickly. But despite the removal of the sweeping travel ban, the department warns: "we continue to recommend U.S. citizens exercise caution when traveling abroad due to the unpredictable nature of the pandemic." Canada and much of Europe, Asia and Oceania are pretty much off-limits to US travelers. But in recent weeks some countries have begun to relax their border restrictions and are now allowing US citizens to enter provided they follow the public health guidelines of the local authorities. Travelers are also encouraged to download the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive travel and emergency alerts. If you do plan to travel, below is a list of where you can go now. But it's important to note this is not a complete list and rules are quickly changing. Albania US travelers can visit Albania without the need to quarantine or prevent a negative COVID-19 test result, but they will be required to submit to health screening at the airport. "Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice," the state department warns. Anguilla Travelers must pre-register their visit on the country's tourism board website and present proof of a negative COVID-19 test, taken no more than five days before travel. The British Overseas Territory is currently accepting online applications for visitors who would like to work remotely with new visa programs. See more here. Antigua and Barbuda US travelers must "present a negative Covid-19-RT-PCR (real time polymerase chain reaction) test result, taken within seven days of their flight." See more here. Armenia Armenia is open to US travelers who take a COVID-19 PCR test upon arrival or self-isolate for 14 days. Aruba Aruba is open to US travelers but they must be tested at the airport and provide requisite insurance coverage. Starting from September 24, travelers from Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Virginia, states deemed high-risk, will be required to present a negative COVID-19 result from a test taken between 12 and 72 hours before flying. The list of states who have to undergo enhanced testing is updated regularly. Aruba has also introduced the "One Happy Workation" program, which allows visitors to stay for a maximum of 90 days, and offers a series of deals and discounted rates at local accommodations. The Bahamas US visitors must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. They also must adhere to the country's safety protocols which include presenting a "COVID-19-PCR Negative (Swab) Test" taken no more than 10 days prior to the date of arrival. See more here. Bangladesh Bangladesh is open to US travelers but they must present a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 72 hours before travel and self-isolate for 14 days, even with a negative test result. Coast of the Carribean Sea in Bridgetown ©Anton_Ivanov/Shutterstock Barbados See Barbados' requirements here. Belarus Despite widespread mass demonstrations, US citizens can visit Belarus without any restrictions. Health screenings are in place at airports. Bermuda See Bermuda's requirements here. Cambodia Cambodia is open to visitors provided they pay a $3000 deposit by cash or credit card for “COVID-19 service charges” at the airport upon arrival, and have $50,000 of travel insurance cover. Colombia International flights between Colombia and the US resumed on Monday with incoming passengers required to present a negative COVID-19 test result. Costa Rica Costa Rica initially opened to residents from just eight US states in September but will increase that to all US residents by Novmber. Tourists must present a negative PCR COVID-19 test result, taken no more than 72 hours before their trip. See full requirements here. Croatia is one of the few countries in Europe that is open to US travelers ©Marcin Krzyzak/Shutterstock Croatia US travelers can visit Croatia, provided they they hold evidence of paid accommodation in the country. Travelers must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 48 hours of arriving in Croatia. If they don't have that, they must undergo a mandatory quarantine/self-isolation period of 14 days upon arrival in the country. Curaçao Th Dutch Caribbean island will open to residents of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut from November, with more states to follow. Tourists from these states must present their driver's licence or state ID at the borders as proof of residence and present a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. See full requirements here. Dominica See Dominica's requirements here. Dominican Republic In August, the Dominican Republic introduced free COVID-19 insurance for travelers, including US citizens, and dropped mass testing at the borders. See more here. Ecuador US travelers must present proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken no more than 10 days ahead of travel, or get tested upon arrival and quarantine while awaiting results. If traveling on to the The Galápagos Islands, travelers must take another COVID-19 test taken within 96 hours of arriving into Ecuador. Egypt Travelers must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken no later than 72 hours before arrival. Travelers must present paper copies of the test result, digital copies will not be accepted. Temples, archaeological sites, and museums are open to tourists. Ethiopia All visitors must present a negative COVID-19 test result before boarding their flight in addition to completing a 14-day quarantine upon their arrival. French Polynesia Travellers must have a COVID-19 test 72 hours before the departure to French Polynesia, and international travel insurance is compulsory for every non-resident visitor Ghana US citizens must present a negative COVID-19 test result from a test conducted no more than 72 hours before travel. Health screenings are in place in airports, and travelers must also undergo a second COVID-19 test upon arrival at a cost of $150 per person. The fee must be paid online and passengers must present proof of payment prior to boarding, according to the US Embassy. Grenada The Spice Island is open to US tourists but has some requirements: visitors must present a recent negative COVID-19 test result; book a minimum of four-day reservation at approved accommodation for observation and quarantine, and undergo a second test after quarantine to travel the island. See more here. Great Sphinx of Giza with the Great Pyramid of Giza. ©Anton Belo/Shutterstock Haiti All international visitors to the country must declare their COVID-19 status via an incoming flight form, will get temperature screened upon arrival and are required to quarantine for 14 days. Honduras Incoming travelers must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result. Ireland US travelers can visit the country but nonessential travelers are asked to quarantine for 14 days and fill in a form indicating where they will stay for the duration of that time. The US Embassy in Ireland notes travelers should "restrict their movements" and "be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice." Due to a surge in coronavirus cases, Dublin is on Level Three of the country's five-level COVID-19 plan until October 9: restaurants and pubs are closed except for takeaway and outdoor service; museums, galleries and libraries are closed and nonessential travel is banned in the capital. The full details of the additional restrictions are available here Jamaica See Jamaica's requirements here. Kenya Travelers must present proof of a negative COVID-19 test result taken no later than 96 hours before arrival and undergo health screening. A nightly curfew is in place from 9pm until 4am and there are restrictions on interstate travel. Water bungalows at Maldives ©haveseen/Shutterstock Maldives Incoming travelers present a with a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of arrival. Montenegro US citizens must present a negative PCR test result no older than 72 hours on arrival, or a positive antibody test result and undergo health screening at the airport. According to the US Embassy in Montenegro, travelers must not have stopped, nor transited through, countries that are not permitted to enter Montenegro within the previous 15 days. Morocco Morocco is open to travelers who have confirmed hotel reservations. Visitors are required to present a negative COVID-19 test that’s no more than 48 hours old upon arrival. Heavily touristed cities, including Marrakesh, Fez, Casablanca and Tangier, are still under a strict lockdown that started at the end of July and is in place until further notice. Mexico Land crossings between the US and Mexico are closed until October 21 but visitors can arrive by plane. However, the CDC currently recommends travelers avoid all nonessential international travel to Mexico as the COVID-19 risk there remains high in places such as Colima, Nuevo León, Nayarit, Mexico City and Baja California Sur. Tourists may be subject to health screenings at airports. Namibia Namibia requires visitors to present a recent negative COVID-19 test result upon arrival, and undergo a second test five days later. Safari parks are open in Rwanda ©Goran Bogicevic/Shutterstock Rwanda Travelers must present a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate for a test taken no more than 120 hours before their initial flight. The US Embassy recommends that travelers carry a printed copy of their negative test results "during all legs of their flights to Rwanda." They must also take a second test and quarantine in a designated hotel for approximately 24 hours while awaiting their results. St Bart's See St Bart's requirements here. St Lucia See St Lucia's requirements here. St Maarten See St Maarten's requirements here. Serbia Serbia is open to US citizens but they must fill out on online health assessment before traveling and a second assessment 10 days into their trip. St Vincent and the Grenadines Travelers who arrive in the country must sign a Pre-Arrival Form. All travelers must present a negative COVID-19 test result taken within five days prior to travel. They will also need to quarantine in an approved hotel for five days and undergo a second test on the fifth day. South Korea US citizens must complete a mandatory 14-day quarantine when entering South Korea. The US Embassy advises that travelers will also experience "some combination of temperature screening, health questionnaires, and/or COVID-tests." All arriving passengers are required to download and respond to daily questions through the Self-Diagnosis Mobile App for 14 days. Tanzania Travelers must provide a negative test result for COVID-19 upon arrival and may be subject to health screening. View of Galata Tower, Galata Bridge in Karakoy quarter of Istanbul ©vovik_mar/Getty Images Turkey Travelers arriving in Turkey will be required to complete an information form and will be checked for symptoms. Anyone suspected of having COVID-19 will be transported to a hospital for examination. Curfews remain in place in some areas but these do not apply to foreign tourists though the US Embassy warns "local authorities may put in place additional COVID-19 restrictions, including curfews, with little or no advance notice." Turks and Caicos See Turks and Caicos' requirements here. Uganda Passengers must arrive with a negative PCR COVID-19 test certificate for a test conducted within 72 hours prior to arrival in Uganda, and undergo a health screening upon arrival, including a temperature check and assessment for other signs or symptoms. In its commitment to keep people safe, Uganda has received the World Travel and Tourism Council’s Safe Travels Global Safety & Hygiene Stamp for complying with enhanced health and safety rules. See full requirements here. United Arab Emirates In Dubai, visitors are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result, taken within 96 hours of arrival, and have medical travel insurance to cover any illness-related expenses. While in Abu Dhabi the rules are more strict; visitors are required to quarantine for 14 days and wear an electronic wristband to ensure quarantine adherence, in addition to providing a negative test result. United Kingdom US citizens arriving into the UK are required to self-isolate for 14 days. There are fears that a second wave is incoming due to a recent surge in new daily coronavirus infections. As a result, new regional lockdown measures have been applied across the country. This article was first published on September 22 and updated on October 20, 2020.

    Inspiration

    How to safely celebrate Halloween in the US this year

    Let’s face it, Halloween is going to be different this year. Because of the pandemic, the CDC recommends skipping trick-or-treating and in-person parties in favor of lower-risk activities like carving and decorating pumpkins with your family or having virtual costume contests with friends. If you’re willing to wear a mask and stay at least six feet from others, moderate-risk activities like outdoor costume parties and visits to pumpkin patches are fine, but indoor costume parties and traditional haunted houses are now considered to be higher-risk. While theme park favorites like Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios and Mickey’s Not-So-Scary Halloween Party at Walt Disney World have been cancelled—die-hards can still attend socially distanced Halloween-themed events at Hersheypark, Dollywood, Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Busch Gardens Tampa Bay and select Six Flags theme parks as long as they book tickets ahead of time, wear a mask and have their temperatures checked upon entry—communities around the country have been forced to get creative and figure out fun ways to keep the spirit of Halloween alive this year. Here’s how you can still celebrate safely. Salem, Massachusetts While Salem is best known for its witch trials of the late-1600s, it’s also a hot spot for all things Halloween. This year, however, Salem will be closed the last weekend of October and its Haunted Happenings events are moving online. Visit the Virtual Haunted Happenings Marketplace to see and buy creative wares from local artists, tour a historic home on a virtual house tour and tune in to see who wins the Halloween at Home Costume Contest. Hudson Valley, New York While most of Sleepy Hollow’s Halloween events have been cancelled due to the pandemic, some, like the All Shorts Irvington Film Festival and Tarrytown Music Hall’s Harvest Hunt and Virtual Ghost Tour are moving online this year. Sleepy Hollow Cemetery Walking Tours and a few other in-person events are also being held with Covid-19 restrictions in place, though you’ll need to book tickets online since no last-minute walk-ins will be allowed in this year. Nearby in Croton-on-Hudson, don’t miss The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze at Van Cortlandt Manor, happening now through November 1, then Nov. 6-8, 13-15 and 20-22. Tickets must be purchased ahead of time online and mask wearing and social distancing are required. Long Island, New York In Old Bethpage, you’ll find the second location of The Great Pumpkin Blaze, operating at limited capacity now through November 1, then Nov. 4-8. In Yaphank, fans of drive-thru haunted houses can brave The Forgotten Road in Southaven County Park. Purchase tickets and download the audio tracks before you go, then play them as you drive up to each of the marked signs in this immersive 30-minute Halloween experience. Washington, D.C. From ghost tours and scary drive-in movies to pumpkin-centric celebrations and Halloween happy hours, there are plenty of ways to celebrate safely in the capitol this year. Yorktown and Norfolk, Virginia For a real treat, head to the Paws at the River Market pet costume parade at 1 p.m. on Oct. 31, part of Yorktown Market Days. Nearby in Norfolk, it’s Halloween at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where staff members dress up as their favorite works of art and kids can create their own glass-blown pumpkins (timed tickets are available online). Spooky virtual tours are also happening via Facebook Live at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Oct. 31, as is a virtual Mystery at the Museum Zoom event starting at 7 p.m. Savannah and Atlanta, Georgia The Savannah Children’s Museum is hosting “Tricks, Treats, and Trains,” at the Georgia State Railroad Museum. The Children’s Museum of Atlanta also has a number of Halloween themed activities happening from October 24–31, like a costumed dance party, spooky exhibits about spiders in The Science Bar and Halloween themed arts and crafts in the Creativity Cafe. Tickets must be booked in advance and all children ages five and up are required to wear a mask. New Orleans, Louisiana Pick up a pumpkin from Lafreniere Pumpkin Patch, dress up for the Jefferson Community Band Halloween Concert on October 29, watch Ghostbusters from your car at the Pontchartrain Center, and visit the New Orleans Nightmare Haunted House, among other themed events this year in Jefferson Parish. Chattanooga, Tennessee This year, Chattanooga Ghost Tours is running its Murder & Mayhem Haunted History Tour as well as a neighborhood Halloween decorating contest, listing the most spirited houses on its website so people can check them out from their cars. Louisville, Kentucky Don’t miss the Jack O’Lantern Spectacular drive-thru experience at Iroquois Park, happening now through Nov. 1 from dusk until 11 p.m. on weeknights and midnight on Friday and Saturday. Be aware that there may be up to a 2.5-hour wait, so bring along your favorite Halloween movie to watch in the car until it’s your turn to go through. Miami, Florida Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables is hosting a special Yappy Hour and pet costume parade on Oct. 29 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Both humans and their dressed up fur babies will receive complimentary snacks during the ticketed event. Over in Miami Beach, restaurants along historic Española Way are offering Halloween night specials on food and cocktails, making it a great spot to grab some outdoor grub. Chicago, Illinois Chicago’s popular Crypt Run is a virtual 5K this year, so sign up through the website and run it on your own terms. This year’s iteration of the Music Box Theatre’s annual scary movie marathon will take place at the Chi-Town Movies Drive-In through Oct. 31. Fans of The Shining will love Room 237, an interactive pop-up experience and lounge at Morgan Manufacturing. You’ll be a guest at the Overlook Hotel, with its giant hedge maze, Gold Room cocktail bar, photo-ops based on movie scenes and specially themed drinks like “Redrum” and “Come Play With Us.” Hocus Pocus fans should stop by the “I Put A Spell On You” pop-up bar and kitchen at Homestead On The Roof now through Nov. 8, where you can taste cocktails and dishes inspired by the film. St. Louis, Missouri Celebrate Halloween at Union Station now through Oct. 31, by wearing your favorite costume, spending 30-45 minutes walking through the tent maze and four historic train cars—all decked out in spooky decorations featuring witches, skeletons and other creepy creatures—and taking home some candy and a pumpkin to decorate. Book your tickets ahead of time online, where there’s also an option to add a scenic ride on the St. Louis Wheel. San Diego, California Mostra Coffee is hosting Movie Nights Under the Stars, where you can catch a showing of Casper or Coco on Oct. 29 or Oct. 30, enjoy dinner and dessert, and win a $50 cash prize in the costume contest. Each adult ticket comes with a Mostra beverage, while each children’s ticket comes with a trick-or-treat bag full of candy. Those with little ones should check out Gyminny’s Spooky Drive-Thru, where you can safely catch a circus show, dress up in your favorite costumes, and get some goodie bags from your car.

    News

    A state-by-state guide to travel restrictions in the US

    If you’re planning to travel between states for a vacation or a short trip, the situation is constantly changing, so it's best to check all local travel advisories before packing your bags. Editor's note: This story was last updated on November 2, 2020. We will update this piece regularly to stay on top of the latest travel advice. Alabama As of November 2, Alabama has no statewide restrictions on travel. According to the governor’s most recent coronavirus-related state of emergency proclamation, issued September 30, masks, social distancing, and other measures are required. Visit the Alabama Tourism Department’s website for updates. Alaska As of August 11, non-residents arriving from out of state must submit a travel declaration form and self-isolation plan to the Alaska travel portal, and either arrive with proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken 72 hours before departure or submit to a test upon arrival, which costs $250 and mandates a quarantine until the results are in. Negative pre-arrival test results can be uploaded to the portal in advance, and travelers awaiting their results can upload proof that they’ve taken the test as well, though they’ll have to quarantine in the meantime. Residents of Alaska returning from another state or country must also follow the steps above, but they can either receive a free COVID-19 test upon arrival and self-quarantine until their results arrive, or skip straight to the self-quarantine – either for 14 days or the duration of their trip, whichever is shorter. See the state’s Safe Travels hub for further details. Arizona As of November 2, there are no travel restrictions for individuals traveling to or through Arizona. Check with the Arizona Office of Tourism for updates. Arkansas As of November 2, Arkansas “encourage[s] potential travelers to assess their own health risks before traveling,” but no overarching guidelines are in place. The state’s Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism has updates. California California’s government is currently discouraging long-distance leisure travel to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but as of November, there are no restrictions on entering from another US state. Travelers are asked to wear a mask in public, keep 6ft away from anyone not in their household, check on local health guidance at all points along their itinerary from start to finish, and refrain from traveling if they’ve been sick in the past 14 days or live with someone with COVID-19. Check Visit California for travel alerts and updates. Colorado As of November 2, Colorado has a statewide mask mandate that requires face coverings be worn indoors and, in some areas, outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. There are no restrictions on travel to the state at this time, but the Colorado Tourism Office has updates and details. Connecticut As part of a joint travel advisory issued with New York and New Jersey, anyone arriving in Connecticut from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. There are 41 states on the list as of October 27, and anyone entering from one of them must fill out a travel health form online or upon arrival, including returning citizens. Connecticut’s official state website has more details. Delaware As of November 2, Delaware has no statewide travel restrictions in place, but social distancing is in effect and masks are required in all public spaces, including parks and boardwalks, and highly encouraged on beaches as well. See the Delaware Tourism Office’s website for information and updates. Florida As of November 2, Florida has no travel restrictions in place, but the health department advises that crowds, closed spaces, close contact, and gatherings of more than 10 people should be avoided, and face coverings should be worn when social distancing isn’t possible. The state’s COVID-19 response site has more details. Georgia As of November 2, there are no restrictions for travel to, from, or within Georgia, though social distancing, sanitation, and public health safety measures are in place and local restrictions may apply. Masks are encouraged, and home isolation is required for anyone who tests positive for COVID-19. For updates on travel restrictions, check the state of Georgia’s website. Hawaii As of October 15, all US travelers will have an alternative to Hawaii’s mandatory 14-day quarantine: a pre-travel test with one of the state’s 11 trusted testing partners. Travelers have to register with the State of Hawaii Safe Travels online system, then submit to a temperature check and complete an online health questionnaire before they can leave the airport. Some counties may require a secondary test upon arrival, including the Big Island’s county of Hawaii, so travelers should check local mandates at their destination. Websites for the state’s tourism authority and transportation department have updates and details, as well as links to the individual counties’ websites. Idaho As of November 2, a 14-day self-quarantine is encouraged for anyone entering Ada County, which includes the city of Boise. The Visit Idaho website has information on the sanitation and social distancing requirements in some communities as well as travel resources across the state, and the governor’s Coronavirus Resources page has regular updates. Illinois Illinois doesn’t currently have any statewide travel restrictions in place, but Chicago has recently updated its emergency travel order requiring visitors from high-risk areas to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. As of November 2, there are 31 states and territories on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The Illinois Department of Public Health has guidance for travelers. Indiana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Indiana. The Indiana Department of Homeland Security’s travel website has information on restrictions within each individual county, and the state’s coronavirus hub has regular updates. Iowa As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Iowa, but everyone over the age of 2 is “strongly encouraged” to wear masks in public, especially when social distancing isn’t possible. The Iowa Tourism Office has more information for travelers. Kansas As of November 2, there are no statewide restrictions in place in Kansas, but some residents and visitors are required to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the state: anyone who attended an out-of-state gathering of 500 people or more where social distancing and mask-wearing were not observed; anyone who has been on a cruise ship or river cruise since March; and anyone who has been notified by public health officials that they’ve been in close contact of a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19. The state’s Department of Health and Environment updates its travel quarantine list approximately every two weeks, and Kansas Tourism offers regular travel updates and resources. Kentucky The latest update to Kentucky’s travel advisory was issued August 12 and recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for anyone entering from states and territories with a positive coronavirus testing rate equal to or greater than 15%, including Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Idaho, South Carolina, Texas, Alabama, and Arizona. Team Kentucky has COVID-19 reports and updates. Louisiana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Louisiana, but a mask mandate remains in effect. The Louisiana tourism office has travel alerts and updates. Maine As of November 2, all travelers visiting Maine must self-isolate for 14 days or have a negative COVID-19 antigen or PCR test within 72 hours of arrival; only those traveling from New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts are exempt. Maine’s Center for Disease Control & Prevention has travel advisories and updates. Maryland Since late July, Maryland has advised against nonessential travel to states with a 10% or higher positivity rate, including Alabama, Florida, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, South Carolina and Texas, as of November 2. People who travel to those states are required to get tested upon returning to Maryland and self-isolate while awaiting results. The tourism office has travel updates and alerts. Massachusetts As of August 1, all arrivals must quarantine for 14 days or present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of travel. Arrivals from high-risk states are required to fill out a health declaration form upon entering the state, and those caught breaking quarantine rules could face fines of up to $500 per day. Essential workers are exempt from the quarantine directive, as are those arriving from lower-risk states – California, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont and Washington, as of November 2. Visit the Department of Public Health’s website for updates. Michigan As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Michigan. For updates and guidelines, see the government’s coronavirus hub or the official tourism website. Minnesota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Minnesota. Masks are required indoors. Explore Minnesota has details on the state’s COVID-19 protocols. Mississippi As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Mississippi. The state’s tourism authority has travel alerts, and the health department has coronavirus updates. Missouri As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Missouri. Check with the state’s Division of Tourism for updates. Montana As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Montana, but masks are required in counties with more than four active COVID-19 cases and encouraged everywhere else. The state’s seven Native American reservations may have different guidelines; visit the Montana tourism office for links to each tribal government’s website as well as general travel alerts. Nebraska As of November 2, travelers returning from international destinations are no longer required to self-quarantine and self-monitor for 14 days upon arrival, though strict social distancing is still recommended. The Nebraska Tourism Commission and the Department of Health and Human Services both have resources and recommendations for travelers. Nevada As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in Nevada. Travel Nevada and the Nevada Health Response both have information for travelers. New Hampshire As of November 2, travelers to New Hampshire from the surrounding states of Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island are no longer required to self-isolate, but those arriving from non-New England states for an extended stay will still need to quarantine for two weeks. Anyone overnighting at a lodging property is also required to sign a document stating that they “remained at home for at least a 14 day quarantine period prior to arriving in the state.” The Department of Health and Human Services has general travel and quarantine guidance, and the state’s official website has information for out-of-state visitors; for updates, see the website for the Division of Travel and Tourism Development. New Jersey Per an incoming travel advisory in effect in New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, anyone entering from an “impacted state” – those with an average daily number of new cases higher than 10 per 100,000 residents over a seven-day period, or those with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day period – is expected to quarantine for 14 days. As of November 2, there are 41 states and jurisdictions on the list: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The state’s COVID-19 information hub has news and updates. New Mexico As of November 2, travelers arriving in New Mexico by car or plane – from states other than Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington – are required to quarantine for 14 days, unless they can provide documentation of a valid negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of entry. Those awaiting test results must self-isolate, and masks are required across the state, with fines of up to $100 for violations. The tourism department has details on updates and exemptions. New York In a joint travel advisory with Connecticut and New Jersey, anyone arriving from a state with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average, must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, including returning citizens and arrivals from Puerto Rico. Out-of-state travelers must fill out a health form upon arrival. Beginning November 4, out-of-state visitors may "test out" of the two-week quarantine. Travelers who were in another state for more than 24 hours must get a test within three days of departure from that state. Then, upon arrival to New York, they must quarantine for three days. On day four of their quarantine, the traveler must get a second COVID test. If both tests are negative, the traveler may leave quarantine early. The list of states on the quarantine list is updated regularly as infection rates change, and the state’s coronavirus hub has updates as well. North Carolina As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Carolina, and visitors are not required to quarantine upon arrival. Social distancing is encouraged, and cloth face coverings are required in public when physical distancing of 6 feet is not possible. See the state’s official website for COVID-19 travel resources. North Dakota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in North Dakota. The state’s Department of Health has guidance for travelers. Ohio Travelers visiting Ohio must quarantine for 14 days if traveling from states with a 15% or higher rate over a seven-day rolling average – as of November 2, Alabama, South Dakota, Idaho, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Nevada, and Utah. For updates, visit Ohio’s coronavirus portal. Oklahoma As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place, but anyone entering Oklahoma from an area with “substantial community spread” should wear a mask in public and refrain from attending indoor gatherings for 10 to 14 days. The state’s department of health has updates and travel advisories. Oregon As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Oregon. Visit the tourism department’s website for travel alerts and information. Pennsylvania As of November 2, a 14-day quarantine is recommended for those arriving from Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Pennsylvania’s Department of Health has information for travelers. Rhode Island Anyone returning from an international destination must self-isolate for 14 days, as must those traveling into Rhode Island from states with a COVID-19 positivity rate higher than 5%. Arrivals who present a negative COVID-19 test result taken no later than 72 hours before travel can bypass quarantine, though quarantine is preferred as the best way of limiting the spread of COVID-19. Non-residents are required to complete a certificate of compliance and an out-of-state travel screening form upon arrival in Rhode Island. The Department of Health maintains a running list of states with travel restrictions upon entry to Rhode Island. South Carolina As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place. Visit South Carolina’s Department of Health and Environmental Control for travel updates and information. South Dakota As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in South Dakota, though some routes through tribal lands may be closed. Travelers should check their itinerary on SafeTravelUsa.com and consult the Department of Tourism’s document regarding travel restrictions on tribal lands. Tennessee As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Tennessee. Check with the state’s Department of Tourist Development for updates. Texas As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or mandatory quarantine requirements in place in Texas. Face coverings are required inside public spaces and outdoor areas where social distancing is not possible, and the government encourages travelers to review the health and safety guidance at their destinations. Travel Texas has updates and information. Utah As of November 2, there are no COVID-19 travel restrictions or quarantine requirements in Utah. Visit the state’s coronavirus hub for travel guidance. Vermont As of November 2, travelers to Vermont must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, unless they receive negative PCR test results on or after day 7 to end their quarantine early. For some travelers, quarantining at home before coming to Vermont is an option. See the Department of Health’s website for updates and details on exceptions to the quarantine requirement. Virginia As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for people arriving from domestic or international destinations to Virginia, but masks are required in public buildings for anyone age 10 or older. Visit the Department of Health for travel updates. Washington As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions or quarantine requirements for arrivals to Washington, though people traveling from high-risk areas should quarantine for 14 days. Masks are required in public spaces indoors, and outdoors as well when social distancing isn’t possible. The Department of Health has updates and frequently asked questions. Washington, DC All nonessential travel outside of the DC metro area is currently discouraged, and any nonessential traveler arriving from a high-risk area – with a positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents, or a state with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average – is required to quarantine for 14 days. Travelers from the border states of Maryland and Virginia are exempt from this rule. For the current list of states requiring a quarantine, last updated November 2, visit Destination DC. West Virginia As of November 2, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in West Virginia. Visit the tourism office’s website for updates and alerts. Wisconsin As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place in Wisconsin, but the government discourages all travel, including travel within the state and between multiple private homes, and recommends that people practice social distancing and stay home as much as possible. In some counties, there are travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners, so check for for area-specific safety updates, closures, and quarantine requirements before departure. Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services has updates and information for travelers. Wyoming As of November, there are no statewide travel restrictions in place for US travelers in Wyoming. Visit Wyoming’s Department of Health for updates.

    Inspiration

    Celebrate 100 years of women's suffrage with these monuments

    August 18, 2020 marks a century since the ratification of the 19th constitutional amendment granting the right to vote regardless of gender. Since far before and after 1920, women of all backgrounds across the U.S. have been championing civil rights and other issues of the day. While landmarks, monuments and memorials to suffragettes and female civil rights advocates might have limited hours or be inaccessible due to COVID-19 mandates, you could walk or drive past some of them. Here is where to begin: Alabama Montgomery’s Dexter Avenue is along the route of the bus that Rosa Parks would board and refuse to give up her seat to a white man in 1955; a life-size statue of Parks stands there. Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum and Library on Montgomery Street is dedicated to Parks’ action and the subsequent Montgomery Bus Boycott. California In San Diego’s Arts District Liberty Station, the Women’s Museum of California preserves her-story by teaching about various women’s experiences and contributions. Colorado In Denver’s Capitol Hill, the Molly Brown House Museum showcases the famous Titanic survivor who helped to organize the Conference of Great Women in 1914 in Newport, while the Center for Colorado Women’s History tells about this topic through exhibits and lectures. In Colorado Springs, a statue of entertainer and philanthropist Fannie Mae Duncan, who owned and integrated the city’s first jazz club, stands outside the Pikes Peak Center. Connecticut In Canterbury, the Prudence Crandall Museum honors Connecticut’s Official State Heroine who ran a higher education academy for African American women until mob violence forced her school to close. In Hartford, the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center is where the “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” author and activist once lived. It now serves as a museum and a forum for social justice and change. Delaware The Old State House in Dover’s First State Heritage Park was where suffragists Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Mary Ann Sorden Stuart addressed Delaware legislators in support of a state constitutional amendment in favor of women’s suffrage. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway crosses into Kent and New Castle counties in Delaware but comes from Maryland’s Eastern Shore and concludes in Philadelphia. It encompasses 45 sites linked to Tubman, who also supported women’s suffrage, plus others who sought freedom from enslavement. District of Columbia In Capitol Hill, the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument was the headquarters for the National Women’s Party; it’s named for Alice Paul, the party’s founder, and Alva Belmont, a major benefactor. In Lincoln Park, the Mary McLeod Bethune Statue is the first to honor an African American woman in a D.C. public park; her home, now the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House, was the first location for the National Council of Negro Women. In Northwest D.C., the Mary Church Terrell House is for the founder and president of the National Association of Colored Women who successfully fought to integrate dining spots in D.C. Florida The Eleanor Collier McWilliams Monument on Tampa’s Riverwalk Historical Monument Trail highlights women's rights pioneer who has been credited with starting the women's suffrage movement in Florida. Illinois Now a private residence, in Chicago’s Douglas neighborhood, the Ida B. Wells-Barnett House was where civil rights advocate and journalist Ida B. Wells, and her husband, Ferdinand Lee Barnett, resided for almost 20 years. Wells led an anti-lynching crusade across the U.S. and fought for woman’s suffrage. Kentucky The SEEK Museum in Russellville has put on display a life-size bronze statue of civil rights pioneer Alice Allison Dunnigan – the first female African American admitted to the White House, Congressional and Supreme Court press corps – at a park adjacent to its Payne-Dunnigan house on East 6th Street. In Lexington, at Ashland, the estate of Henry Clay, a marker honors Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, Clay’s great-granddaughter, social reformer and suffragist. Maryland Along the Harriet Tubman Byway, the Bucktown Village Store in Cambridge is where a young Tubman would defy an overseer’s order and was impacted by a resulting head injury. At Historic St. Mary’s City in Southern Maryland, learn about Margaret Brent, an 17th century woman asking the colony’s leaders for voting rights. In Baltimore, the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum was home to this predominant Civil Rights leader and president of the city’s NAACP branch. Massachusetts The Boston Women’s Heritage Trail encompass various neighborhoods and the women who lived in or are connected to them; their Women’s Suffrage Trail goes by stops such as the Boston Women’s Memorial. In Adams, the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum highlights what would influence this suffragist’s early life. Michigan In Battle Creek, where she lived out her final years, the Sojourner Truth Monument in Monument Park honors this abolitionist, suffragist and orator. Minnesota The Minnesota Woman Suffrage Memorial Garden at the Capitol Mall in St. Paul has a 94-foot steel trellis with the names of 25 key Minnesota suffragists. A series of steel tablets shares the story of the fight for women’s suffrage in this state. New Jersey The New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail includes sites such as the Paulsdale, the childhood home of suffragette Alice Stokes Paul that’s now part of the Alice Paul Institute. New Mexico Now the staff offices for the Georgia O’Keefe Museum in Santa Fe, the Alfred M. Bergere House was where Adelina (Nina) Otero Warren, a noted suffragist, author and business woman lived. She headed the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (a precursor to the National Woman’s Party). New York In Seneca Falls, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park contains the Wesleyan Chapel, where the First Women’s Rights Convention met, and the home of suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Harriet Tubman lived out the rest of her life in Auburn at Harriet Tubman National Historical Park. In Rochester, see the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House and take a selfie with “Let’s Have Tea,” the statue of Anthony with her friend Frederick Douglass in Anthony Square. The Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site in Hyde Park is the only one of its kind to a U.S. First Lady. Shirley Chisholm State Park in Brooklyn is named for first African American Congresswoman and the first woman and African American to run for president. Ohio An “Ohio Women in History” road itinerary lists eight stops including Oberlin College, which first granted undergrad degrees to women in a co-ed setting, and the Upton House and Women's Suffrage Museum in Warren, which recognizes Ohio suffragists. In Akron, a historical marker for Sojourner's Truth "Ain't I A Woman" speech commemorates where the church she spoke at once stood. Tennessee In Nashville, the Hermitage Hotel was used as a headquarters by suffragists to secure Tennessee’s ratification. Centennial Park is where the Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument depicts five suffragists -- Carrie Chapman Catt, Sue Shelton White, J. Frankie Pierce, Anne Dallas Dudley and Abby Crawford Milton. Knoxville’s Tennessee Woman Suffrage Memorial depicts suffragists Lizzie Crozier French of Knoxville, Anne Dallas Dudley of Nashville, and Elizabeth Avery Meriwether of Memphis. Texas In downtown Dallas, Fair Park has a women’s history lesson where the 1893 State Fair featured a woman’s congress of over 300 women. During its 1913-1917 years, the fair’s Suffrage Day had local suffragists coming to promote women’s voting rights. Houston’s Barbara Jordan Park is named for this Civil Rights activist who was both the first African elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction and the first Southern African-American woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The Christia Adair Park features a mural depicting Adair’s devotion to gaining equal rights for blacks and women. Virginia In downtown Richmond, at Broad and Adams streets, a statue of Maggie L. Walker honors this civil rights activist and entrepreneur. Nearby, Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site represents more about accomplishments, including being the first woman to serve as president of a bank in the U.S. At the Virginia State Capital, the Virginia Women’s Monument features Walker and artist and suffragist Adele Clark among its 12 statues of women from across the Commonwealth. In Richmond’s Capitol Square, Virginia Civil Rights Memorial honors Barbara Johns, a Civil Rights activist led the first non-violent student demonstration in 1951. Wyoming In Laramie, the Wyoming House For Historic Women has an outdoor sculpture of Louisa Swain, who was the first woman to cast a ballot; it’s a block away from where she did that. Then, the Wyoming Women’s Suffrage Pathway includes part of South Pass City; it’s home to Esther Morris, the first woman to serve in the office as Justice of the Peace.

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