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    Bath,

    Maine

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    Bath is a city in Sagadahoc County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 8,514 at the 2010 census, and 8,329 as of 2018; the population has had a change of -10.2% since 2000. It is the county seat of Sagadahoc County, which includes one city and 10 towns. The city is popular with tourists, many drawn by its 19th-century architecture. It is home to the Bath Iron Works and Heritage Days Festival, held annually on the Fourth of July weekend. It is commonly known as "The City of Ships" because of all the sailing ships that were built in the Bath shipyards. Bath is part of the metropolitan statistical area of Greater Portland.
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    Inspiration

    Romantic Montana vacations for couples

    Imagine being snuggled up in a cozy cabin somewhere far away from reality. The fire is glowing as snow-capped mountains sit in the background. Hiking trails and ski slopes abound. This mental picture is why we’re convinced there might be no better place for a romantic getaway this Valentine’s Day than Montana, dubbed “The Last Best Place” for a reason. The western part of the state particularly makes it obvious why it earned the right to that nickname. The global health crisis has meant weddings across the country (and the world) have been downsized, postponed, or canceled altogether. But celebrating love seems more important than ever as we collectively hit the year anniversary of socially distancing from friends, family, and lovers. While the coronavirus pandemic is far from over, Montana offers couples the perfect place to turn up the romance and disconnect from the noise this February in a safe and snowy setting. The first step in setting up the sexiest, socially-distant Valentine’s escape in Montana is finding the right place to stay. Calowahcan Cabin Ronan, Montana Set against the Mission Mountain range is an idyllic couples retreat in the form of a 500 square foot cabin. The cabin and its signature slanted roof sits on 10 acres of prairie only minutes from untamed Montana wilderness. The scenery is the selling point, but Calowahcan’s giant ceramic bathtub is a surefire way to set the mood. Unwind with your lover by lighting a bonfire on the patio, wildflowers and mountain peaks standing in the distance. Calowahcan is the right accommodation for couples seeking rest and respite; those who want to hit the hiking trails but, ultimately, are happy to settle in for an evening surrounded by snowy peaks on the horizon. Classic Whitefish A-Frame Whitefish, Montana This A-frame cabin in picturesque Whitefish is what Montana getaway dreams are made of. A cosy bed sits in the loft space overlooking Whitefish Lake, with twinkly lights illuminating the patio. The bonfire pit out back is well suited for warming up over s’mores making. Exploring the town is made simple thanks to the cabin being ideally located only a 10-minute drive from breweries and restaurants. Having a Valentine’s weekend spent in Whitefish is especially well-suited for skiers and snowboarders, as the town is home to one of the state’s most esteemed ski resorts. Meadowlark Treehouse Columbia Falls, Montana What is more romantic than cuddling up to your loved one under twinkly lights hanging from a three-story treehouse? Not much, honestly. A simple scroll of Meadowlark’s Instagram account will have you drooling over the interior of the cabin in equal measure to the beauty right out the front door. The treehouse comes full of blankets, board games, and books to keep you occupied, as well as a fire pit if you fancy lighting a fire. Reclusive Moose Cabins West Glacier National Park, Montana On the edge of West Glacier, near crystal clear lakes and purple mountains, are a set of small log cabins with the necessary amenities for a lovers’ retreat. Fireplace? Check. Kitchen fully equipped for you to cook up a Valentine’s Day dinner? Check. Comfortable bed for post-hike cuddles? Check. As a cutesy touch, each cabin is named after Montana wildlife, which you very well might encounter if you venture back in the warmer months of the year. Being based in West Glacier for Valentine’s Day means you’re surrounded by staggering scenery, including nearby Lake McDonald, and astonishing quiet-- the makings of a truly intimate vacation. Kalispell Grand Kalispell, Montana If cabins and treehouses aren’t really your thing, the historic Kalispell Grand Hotel’s lodging might be perfectly suited for you. Located in the heart of the downtown area, the Kalispell Grand used to host luxury travelers for a whopping $2 per night. Nowadays, the price point has changed and the amenities have no doubt been upgraded, but the Kalispell Grand still holds onto its old-time, Montana charm thanks to details like the lobby’s solid oak staircase and moose head taxidermy. It’s in a premier location, within walking distance of local establishments like Norm’s Soda Fountain, Colter Coffee, and Kalispell Brewery. Kalispell as a town is an ideal base for a romantic Montana getaway because it’s near marvelous Flathead Lake, a short drive from Whitefish ski slopes, and not far from Glacier National Park. Bitterroot River Bed & Breakfast Stevensville, Montana Right along the Bitterroot River is a large red house with a wrap-around porch. The house’s four bedrooms were turned into a bed and breakfast over a decade ago and has become the “home away from home” for fly-fishing enthusiasts, business travelers, and lovers alike. Fresh coffee is brought to the door of your room every morning at 7:30, giving you time to slowly rise before a home-cooked farm to table breakfast is served in the sunroom. Each room is uniquely decorated with Montana touches-- think bear paw prints on the comforters and antlers on the wall. You and your valentine are steps away from outdoor recreation of all sorts, but can rest easy knowing you’ll be in great hands once you retire for the evening. Kimpton Armory Hotel Bozeman, Montana Another less rustic choice is the Kimpton Armory Hotel located in one of Montana’s most aesthetic towns. It is a hotel made for modern lovers. Everything about the Kimpton is sleek: its on-site dining, its interior design, its common areas. The Kimpton’s rooftop is a great place for a nightcap before you slip back into the warmth of your contemporary bedroom. Once you’ve booked your stay, you’ll need to find COVID-appropriate activities to enjoy with your Valentine. A February visit comes with the bonus of fewer crowds, and it also means you have a bevy of winter time activities to choose from. Catch fresh air and stunning views by taking part in any (or all) of these pandemic-approved, outdoor activities. *Please note: at time of publishing, face masks are required across Montana in all public indoor spaces. Dogsled Dog sledding isn’t just an Alaskan bucket list item-- Montana has incredible dog sledding rails and operators, particularly in the Western part of the state. An energetic team of dogs will lead you through the stillness of the beauty that surrounds you as they run down snowy trails. Most operators offer half-day adventures, but some have a multi-night option that allows you to extend your sledding experience. Fun fact: the reality-TV famed Kardashian family were keen to book a dog sledding excursion, but refused to pay and, ultimately, missed out on this incredible winter activity. Skiing and snowboarding Montana has some of the best slopes for skiing and snowboarding and, thanks to its geographical location, it also receives a dependable amount of fresh snow. Although equipment rental and lift tickets make for an expensive day out, the rush of gliding downhill is worth every penny. Whitefish Mountain, Big Sky, Bridger Bowl, and Showdown are some of the state’s finest ski and snowboarding resorts. For a more affordable option, Maverick Mountain has virtually no lift ticket fees and extends over 450 family-owned acres. Horseback trail rides It might seem counterintuitive to go horseback riding in the cold, but it’s magic. Big, fat flakes falling around you as you sit back and take in the views. In order to book a horseback trail ride, you’ll need to find an outfitter or guide near you to lend you a horse and lead you along the trail. Your accommodation might be able to recommend a local ranch with guides for you to hire, like the renowned Artemis Acres. You can also find operating and COVID-compliant trail rides online via the Visit Montana directory. Hiking A super traditional (and budget-friendly) way to spend any day in Montana (rain, shine, or snow) is hitting the hiking trails that undoubtedly surround you. Hiking doesn’t require prior booking, loads of gear, or heaps of money. Due to the nature of Montana’s winter weather conditions, you’re also likely to have paths all to yourselves-- a total bonus during a pandemic. Snowshoeing If you’re up to burn more calories and try something a little different, snowshoeing is a great alternative to hiking. You’ll need to rent some snowshoes, but that’s easily done in most Montana towns with outdoor recreation retailers. Your body will work harder, but there are fewer things as luxurious as a post-snowshoe bubble bath back at your cabin or hotel. Make sure you know what trails are conducive to snowshoeing before you head out! You can do this by asking your equipment rental company what paths they recommend. Soaking in a natural hot spring West Montana has a wealth of natural hot springs for you and your Valentine to warm up in. Some of the most famed are Quinn’s Hot Springs in Plains, Chico Hot Springs in Pray, and Elkhorn Hot Springs in Polaris. Many of the hot springs locations offer premium lodging and fine dining options including private cabins to stay in and locally-sourced, wild game. Currently, many hot springs require advanced booking; make sure you plan accordingly. Snowmobiling Snowmobiling is a surefire way to ramp up the excitement in your Valentine celebrations. It’s a great adrenaline rush for those looking to tear up fresh powder. Lucky for you and your date, Western Montana in the winter time was made for adventure junkies to slide over frozen lakes and zoom along groomed trails.

    Inspiration

    Does Abraham Lincoln's ghost haunt The White House?

    The White House is one of the USA's most iconic buildings. Imagine how much its walls have seen since it opened in 1800. The spirits of countless scandals, wars, assassinations, and other political skullduggery are commonplace. But what if other spirits haunt the walls of The White House? As it turns out, multiple people report being haunted by one particular ghost - that of President Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln, who was assassinated on April 14, 1865 and died just a few blocks from The White House, has been said to haunt the halls since his death. The first reported haunting of Abraham Lincoln's ghost happened in 1870. A photographer named William H. Mumler took a photo of the widowed Mary Todd Lincoln. When the photo was processed, the ghost of her husband can be seen standing behind her. Sharp minds might dismiss this as an accidental double negative, or some other type of trick with film. But, consider these other reports.Mary Todd Lincoln with the ghost of her husband. Photo by William H. Mumler (public domain) Several First Families have reported hearing footsteps pacing the hall outside the Lincoln bedroom. Eleanor Roosevelt reported that her dog, Fala, would often bark at what she presumed to be Lincoln's ghost. Harry Truman's daughter Margaret reported hearing a specter tapping on the door of the bedroom. President Truman himself reported being jolted awake in the middle of the night by taps on the Lincoln bedroom door. Other White House employees have reported seeing shadows of Abraham Lincoln sleeping in the Lincoln Bedroom, or pulling on his boots. People also claim to have seen Lincoln's ghost directly. First Lady Grace Coolidge was the first person to report physically seeing the ghost - she saw Abraham Lincoln standing at a window, staring outside. On one occasion, FDR's personal valet ran screaming from The White House after he saw Lincoln's ghost. President Lyndon Johnson also reported seeing Abraham Lincoln's ghost, in times of distress. Johnson reportedly asked the ghost of Abraham Lincoln how to handle war, and reported Lincoln's response to be "don't go to the theater." The Lincoln Bedroom. Source: Library of Congress.Lincoln's presence doesn't just haunt Americans. In 1942, Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands claims to have heard footsteps outside the bedroom she was staying in at The White House. She answered a knock at the door, and then found Abraham Lincoln, in his coat and top hat, standing before her. Winston Churchill reportedly met Abraham Lincoln's ghost while naked. Churchill was fresh out of a bath, where he loved to drink scotch and smoke a cigar to relax. He walked into his White House bedroom fully naked, still smoking a cigar, only to see the apparition of Abraham Lincoln standing near the fireplace. As Churchill told it later, he tapped the end of his cigar and said "Good evening, Mr. President. You seem to have me at a disadvantage." Reportedly, Lincoln laughed to himself and disappeared.

    Budget Travel Lists

    10 budget-friendly social distancing adventures near Dallas

    1. Wild Berry Farm For those looking for a perfect summer photo setting, Wild Berry Farm in Sadler, Texas is a perfect day trip. It was Voted as one of the 30 best sunflower fields in the United States by Country living magazine. Not only can you spend the day running through a giant sunflower field, visitors are also allowed to pick them as well. Wild Berry Farm has other activities including picking, blackberry and blueberry tomatoes, melons and zinnias flowers. Visitors must bring their own jars and scissors for picking. Currently, reservations must be made in advance online and their cafe is closed. Image by Ruston Anne/Lonely Planet 2.Denton, TX Just 40-minutes north of Dallas, you'll find yourself in the city of Denton.Visitors can take a stroll through its historical downtown and take a walking tour of the street art and murals. Another site many travelers come to visit is to see the very famous Old Alton Bridge also known as Goatman's Bridge which according to local legend some believe is hunted by a figure that looks like a goat head with a man's body. The bridge has even been featured on the Tv show “Ghost Adventures”. But For those who still want to be outdoors Ray Roberts Lake State Park is perfect for hikes, swimming and camping. As of July 3, groups of more than 10 are not allowed in the park and face masks are required for indoor facilities. 3.Dinosaur Valley State Park Located near Fort Worth, Dinosaur Valley State Park stands out not just because of its name, but because of how it got it. Visitors get the opportunity to walk, hike, and camp like any other park, but they can also discover real dinosaur footprints. Dinosaur Valley also created a map people can follow to locate each of the footprints. Most of the footprints are located near the Paluxy River, where visitors can also swim and fish. There are also self-guided and guided horseback riding tours to take around the park. Dinosaur Valley is open but does require reservations to be made online or by phone.Source: Puwadol Jaturawutthichai/Shutterstock4.Cedar Valley State Park Cedar Valley State Park is the closest state park to the city. Perfect for hikes, biking and camping and for water lovers this park is also home to its own gravel beach. The 7,500-acre Joe Pool Lake makes Cedar Valley State Park a great location for swimming, boating, paddling and fishing. Visitors can also take a tour of the Penn Farm Agricultural History Center and learn about the Pen families farming history in the area. Although the park is open to the public again, online reservations are still required and there are other guidelines recommended by the state. 5.Lavender Ridge Farm Hidden in Gainesville is Lavender Ridge Farm, located just an hour outside of Dallas. The farm was originally a melon and strawberry farm but as of 2006 it now grows lavender, cut flowers and herbs in its fields. This farm allows visitors to roam its fields making it a great place to take pictures. The farm also has its own gift shop and cafe. You can find handmade lavender products from hand soaps, lotion and bath salts in their gift shop. The cafe, Cafe Lavender, includes a lavender inspired menu. The farm has been open as of May 8 and is taking precautions to clean and stay safe. Source: Alberto Loyo/Shutterstock6.Possum Kingdom Lake If you travel to Palo Pinto county, you don't want to miss a visit to Possum Kingdom Lake. This park is a perfect location for those who enjoy spending time in or around water. Possum Kingdom Lake has 300 miles of shorelines and is known for its clear blue water. And for water sport enthusiasts, visitors can go swimming, fishing, skiing, scuba diving and snorkeling. But this park is also a great location for picnics, camping and offers different campsite options and air-conditioned cabin rentals. Like other state parks in Texas, Possum Kingdom Lake is open and with some guidelines such as keeping a distance and recommended face covering and reservations must still be made online or by phone beforehand. 7.Turner Falls Park If you're driving to Davis, Oklahoma you're most likely on your way to Turner Falls Park, home to Oklahoma's tallest waterfall with a height of 77 feet. Since its reopening on May 1st, Turner Falls has limited its capacity to 2,000 people, but tickets can be bought online in advance to secure a spot. The park is also known for its hiking trails, waterslides and even cave exploring. For overnight stays visitors can camp out, bring their own RV or rent a cabin but to comply with social distancing only half their rentals will be available to reserve. Source: Christopher Winfield/Shutterstock8.Mineral Wells, TX While visiting Mineral Wells is heading downtown. Visitors can take a walking tour outside of the now closed Baker Hotel built in 1929 which was once known as one of the most glamour’s resorts of its time. And for nature lovers Mineral Wells is a great location for trails and rivers for anyone interested in hiking. Mineral Wells is following the state of Texas reopening guidelines and is advising to stay in small groups and keeping your face covered. 9.Fort Worth Botanic Garden Fort Worth, Dallas' neighbor and just west of the city. One destination you don't want to miss is visiting The Fort Worth Botanic Garden. Since being established in 1934, it is actually one of the oldest Botanic Gardens in the state of texas. It's home to a variety of different gardens from rose gardens to rain forest conservatory but its most popular section is the Japanese garden. Its 7.5 square feet japanese inspired gardens including artecute pieces,cherry blossom trees and other native plants, complete with a koi fish pond. Because of Covid-19 the garden is capped at 200 visitors a day and no picnics are allowed at this time. 10.Fossil Rim Wildlife Center At Fossil Rim Wildlife Center you can experience a real life safari right here in Glen Rose,Texas. the park is a not-for-profit captive breeding programs for indigenous and exotic endangered and threatened species. Guests can take a tour hour self guided tours around the park right in their own vehicle. Guests are required to wear a mask anytime they are not inside their vehicle. Stacey Ramirez is a Budget Travel intern for Summer 2020. She is a Senior at Texas State University.

    Budget Travel Lists

    10 ways to explore the San Francisco Bay area while social distancing

    San Francisco is unlike any other city in the world. There are always new places to visit with views to appreciate. Unfortunately, this area is in Phase 2B until further notice. This means that the requirement to wear a mask is in full sail and there are still some places that haven’t reopened, thus limiting options for adventure. Though you will not find yourself on the eerie Alcatraz Island, cheering at a Giants baseball game or watching the sea lions at Pier 39, there are still plenty of activities to enjoy. Source: Milleflore Images/Shutterstock Outside of San Francisco 1. Napa Valley and Sonoma County If you like sipping wine with your friends, then this is the area for you. With over 850 wineries between Napa and Sonoma, you will never run out of wine to taste, restaurants to enjoy, places to stay, and shopping/museums to explore. Whether old or new, each winery will bring their own unique taste and experience. Due to COVID-19, only wineries, restaurants, and tasting rooms that are able to operate outdoors will remain open for the time being. 2. Corning, California Though Corning is a small town of only about 7,500 people, it is the olive capital of the United States and the largest olive processing plant in the nation. The Olive Pit is still operating under COVID-19 restrictions, so the café (to-go orders only) and store are open but the option to pick-up is available as well. The Olive Pit has expanded their products beyond just olives to olive oil, craft beer, wine, nuts, flavored balsamic vinegar, mustards, and gift items. This local shop is the perfect way to introduce you and your family to the new exciting olive flavors. 3. Tiburon, California Just across the Golden Gate Bridge north of San Francisco lies the beautiful city of Tiburon. Life there includes lovely family bike rides, landmarks, shops, wineries and restaurants and many opportunities to get out in nature. One of the hidden gems within Tiburon is Hippie Tree. All you have to do is park near 100 Gilmartin Drive and take a little hike up the fire road. Once you have reached the top, you will find a secluded area with a breathtaking view of the Golden Gate Bridge with a huge eucalyptus tree and a swing. 4. Half Moon Bay If you’re looking for a place to go surfing, spend time on a pier, launch a boat for a morning on the water or even fish off-the-dock, Half Moon is the place for you and it’s only about 40 minutes from San Francisco. There is also endless sea food calling your name. San Mateo County is following social distancing guidelines and some places require a mask to be worn but almost everything remains open. Half Moon Bay and Pillar Point Harbor are ready to give you a day of fun. Source: Brian Patrick Feulner/Shutterstock 5. Carmel, California Point Lobos State Reserve has a little bit of everything for everyone. It has even been called “the greatest meeting of land and sea in the world.” There are plenty of opportunities to see wildlife such as sea lions, harbor seals, elephant seals, sea otters, orcas and in the winter, grey whales seen from the shore. Point Lobos is also very well-known for birding and hiking. It is a birders paradise and offers hikers several trails ranging from beginner to challenging. One of the most unique parts of Point Lobo is what lies under the water. The undisturbed aquatic life is one of the most varied in the world and is one of the top preferred diving and snorkeling spots. The reserve has closed and/or changed the hours of operation throughout the pandemic so make sure to check before hopping in the car. Hidden Treasures Within the City 6. Mosaic Stairways One of the reasons San Francisco is adored by so many is because of the culture and art scattered all through the city in the most unique ways. The staircases started as average concrete stairs but were transformed with gorgeous, colorful, and bright handmade tiles arranged in patterns that all flow together. There are three locations. One at 16th Ave, one in the Hidden Garden and the last in Lincoln Park. Source: bgrissom/Shutterstock 7. Beaches Two of the most popular beaches in San Francisco are Baker beach, known for the northwestern view of the Golden Gate Bridge and Ocean Beach on the west coast, though foggy and a bit chilly, is the city’s longest and sandiest stretch of shoreline. These beaches are only open to those on foot or bike (still available for rent throughout the city and perfect for a trip across the bridge) as the parking lots are still closed due to the Coronavirus. 8. Sutro Bath Ruins This architectural landmark in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, on the western side of San Francisco, is from 1894 when millionaire Adolph Sutro designed the largest saltwater pool that was filled by the ocean during high tide. The baths have not been in operation since before the Great Depression, but this piece of history remains and is intriguing to check out. Right near Sutro Baths is the well-known restaurant, Cliffhouse (open for takeout Thursday-Monday.) Normally there are tons of other activities in the park to enjoy, but unfortunately, any facilities that don’t make social distancing possible remain closed until the state of California can find a way to open them safely. When they do open again, one of the main attractions are all of the historical sites. For a jump back in time there are locations like Fort Mason, a Cold War Museum called Nike Missile Site, or a lesson on homeland security in the 1930’s with a 16-inch gun at Battery Townsley. Once there is a plan in place, the park will open in phases. This doesn’t include a long list of beaches, some campgrounds and other outdoor activities that visitors are still welcome to explore. Source: Michael Urmann/Shutterstock 9. Haight- Ashbury This district of San Francisco has always been a hotspot in the city, especially during the 50’s and 60’s. It is a lively and funky place with shops, restaurants, and historical sites. The most magical part of the area is that most of the people who work or live there have been able to keep the flower power and hippie vibe alive over the years. Haight-Ashbury is also known for the brightly colored Victorian style homes that survived the 1906 earthquake and fire. (For another hidden gem within the city, search for the golden fire hydrant which is said to be the only functioning hydrant during the fire!) 10. Seward Street Slides For a quick adventure, these slides are always a blast! They were created by a 14-year-old girl in a “design the park” contest in the 1960’s. The slides are still in use today. All you have to do is bring a piece of cardboard with you to sit on! Haley Beyer is a Budget Travel intern for Summer 2020. She is a Senior at the University of Nevada, Reno.

    Adventure

    Where to Swim With Sharks (Really)

    Sharks are absolutely crucial when it comes to having a healthy ocean environment. Luckily, supporting shark conservation comes in many different forms and you can be a part of it. From shark-tagging with scientists in the Bahamas to swimming with sharks in Hawaii to photographing them in Rhode Island, here’s where to score quality time with these misunderstood creatures. 1. Exuma, Bahamas The gorgeous waters off Great Exuma are home to tiger sharks, nurse sharks and Caribbean reef sharks galore. Thanks to the Bahamas' distinction as a shark sanctuary, the shark population here is protected and healthy. That said, it’s an ideal place to conduct shark research. That’s where Beneath the Waves, a nonprofit-organization focused on shark conservation, and The Grand Isle Resort & Spa, come in. Its shark-tagging program gives people the chance to step into the role of shark scientist for the day. For four hours you’ll be gathering scientific data from sharks to help scientists understand the shark’s movements and how the sharks are using their habitats. Guests, if they choose, help measure the sharks, take small tissue and fin-clip samples and attach tags and tracking devices to sharks. So far, the team has tagged almost 200 sharks in the Bahamas. Afterward, relax at Grand Isle with a massage, a dip in the infinity-edge pool or a Bahamian-inspired dinner at 23° North Beach Club. Hotel guests have full access and non-guests may purchase a day pass for $50. If you’re ready to venture out again, the hotel can arrange lunch on a private island or a boat tour through the Exuma Cays for cave snorkeling and a stop at a gorgeous sandbar. How it works: Reserve spots on shark-tagging adventures by making a donation to Beneath the Waves. What else is there to see: Stingrays, sea turtles, and an island of iguanas. When to go: Keep an eye on the website to find out when the next excursions will be. 2. La Jolla, Calif. Each year, leopard sharks flock to the photogenic coast of La Jolla, a seaside community in San Diego. What makes it so special? It’s the largest annual aggregation of leopard sharks in the world. Thanks to the calm, shallow water and nutrient-rich kelp forests, it’s an ideal place for hundreds of pregnant female leopard sharks to take up residence; they’re often just a few feet from shore. Say hello to the sharks while you flipper-kick through four microhabitats in the La Jolla Underwater Park. An hourlong leopard-shark tour with Everyday California is perfect for newbie shark enthusiasts since leopard sharks (typically about 4 feet long) are virtually harmless. Added bonus: Their distinctive markings make for some epic underwater photos. If you’re lucky, you may spot tiny baby leopard sharks. Continue the adventure by kayaking to the sea caves or hiking Mount Soledad for epic views of San Diego County. When hunger strikes, pop into Blue Water Seafood for drool-worthy fish tacos, oysters and homemade seafood soups. How it works: Meet at the Everyday California shop and two snorkel guides will lead you through the rocky reefs in search of leopard sharks. What else is there to see? Shovel nose guitar fish, dolphins, sea lions, lobsters and turtles. When to go: July through September 3. Tiger Beach, Bahamas The Bahamas is also home to Tiger Beach, a consistently sharky spot attracting divers from around the world. Known for their beautiful stripes and broad, flat heads, tiger sharks are the star attraction of this dive spot. You can’t miss ‘em: These mammoths can weigh more than 1,900 pounds. An added bonus: Reef sharks, lemon sharks, hammerheads and nurse sharks love to frequent the area, too. Because visibility is often 100 feet or more at Tiger Beach, it makes for not only an unforgettable dive but also an insane backdrop for photos. Believe it or not, many of these creatures travel thousands of miles each year and end up back at Tiger Beach consistently. West End Watersports, a dive shop located at Old Bahama Bay Resort & Yacht Harbour, is where the adventure begins. From the hotel, it’s a two-and-a-half-hour boat ride to Tiger Beach. You’ll have two 1-hour long dives in approximately 25 feet of water. How it works: Groups are limited to a maximum of eight divers. Guests staying at Old Bahama Bay receive a diving discount. What else is there to see: Sea turtles, mahi mahi, tuna, grouper, snapper and barracuda. When to go: September to April 4. Cancun, Mexico To score some quality time with the biggest shark in the ocean, the whale shark, visit Cancun. Hundreds of the majestic creatures (some are the length of a school bus) migrate here every year to feed and socialize. You can get close enough to the gentle giants to clearly see the perfectly patterned pale yellow dots and stripes on their skin. Don’t worry, though: Plankton is their snack of choice. Blue Caribe Tours takes guests (up to 10) on a day trip that gives you two glorious hours swimming with the whale sharks. Afterward, enjoy a pitstop in Punta Norte in Isla Mujeres to snack on fresh ceviche. Rest your head at TRS Coral Hotel, an adults-only all-inclusive in Cancun. Treat your muscles to a hot and cold hydromassage bath at the spa, relax in the pool in a floating chair or take a ride on the boat channel system. With one private beach club, seven à la carte restaurants, one show-cooking restaurant and 18 bars, it’s impossible to be bored. Be sure to leave time to see the Mayan ruins and a nearby cenote. How it works: For the whale-shark tour, Blue Caribe picks guests up at the hotel around 7:30 a.m. and returns them around 4 p.m. What else is there to see: Sea turtles, manta rays and starfish. When to go: June through September 5. Narragansett, Rhode Island New England is home to about 50 species of sharks. The main ones you will come across, though, are the blue shark and the mako shark. Hitting speeds of up to 60 m.p.h., makos are the fastest shark in the ocean. Both travel the Gulf Stream waters here, and it’s one of only a few locations in the world where they can regularly be encountered. Rhode Island Shark Diving, run by award-winning shark cinematographer Joe Romeiro, offers a 12-hour excursion on a 45-foot research vessel custom-made for interacting with and filming wildlife. Throughout the day sharks will arrive at the boat as you drift over different sites. How it works: Most trips are run in three consecutive days to maximize the animals you see. There are a few days per month, however, for one or two-day trips. Divers must wear all-black wetsuits, fins, gloves, hoods, masks and snorkels. What else is there to see: Whales, dolphins, mola mola and mahi mahi. When to go: Mid-June to mid-September 6. Oahu, Hawaii About three miles off of Oahu’s North Shore, it’s possible to find Galapagos sharks, sandbar sharks and tiger sharks. For a chance to spend quality time with them, sign up for a 2-hour pelagic shark snorkel with Ocean Ramsey’s One Ocean Diving, and you might meet Captain Pancakes, Frankenfin or Miss Aloha. (The team has affectionately named some of the repeat shark visitors.) When it comes to sharks, Ramsey’s goal is to replace fear with education. Guests join marine biologists on the excursion and learn all about shark conservation and research. How it works: Guests don snorkels and stay near the boat. For divers who want a more in-depth look at sharks, consider the 4-hour One Ocean advanced shark diving and tiger search program where you’ll learn even more about shark behavior. What else is there to see: Green sea turtles, spinner dolphins, monk seals, flying fish, Booby birds, whales (November-May) and whale sharks. When to go: All year long. Galapagos Islands If you are itching to see Scalloped hammerheads, here’s your chance. Four major currents combined with nutrient-dense waters make the Galapagos Islands an incredible home for sharks, especially hammerheads. Ecoventura’s Galapagos Sky, a live-aboard built specifically for diving in the Galapagos, takes guests on a 7-day cruise to places like the remote Wolf and Darwin Islands, which have the highest abundance of sharks in the world. Here, it’s common to see big schools of hammerheads. Wreck Bay Dive Center, on San Cristobal Island, is a solid choice if you’d like to do a day or two of diving. How it works: Due to strong currents and diving depths, divers must be advanced. What else is there to see? Penguins, turtles, sea lions, Galapagos Sharks, silky sharks, whitetips, blacktips, horn sharks, eagle rays, manta rays, dolphins, sea lions, Galapagos penguins, green sea turtles, hawksbill sea turtles, mola mola, endemic marine iguanas and whale Sharks (late May thru November). When to go: All year. Get more travel inspiration, tips and exclusive offers sent straight to your inbox with Lonely Planet’s weekly newsletter. Check out adventure tours for every traveler from our trusted partners.

    Inspiration

    San Francisco's 5 Best Fog-Watching Spots

    On the spectrum of anthropomorphized inanimate objects with a hefty social media presence, San Francisco’s Karl the Fog (@karlthefog on Twitter and Instagram) is a clear favorite. Emerging in 2010 as the voice of the city’s seminal weather event, he’s since become a cultural touchstone, earning mentions in local weather reports and online media and even featuring as an answer to a question on Jeopardy. (“I'll take ‘Never Saw That Coming’ for $1,000, Alex,” he says.) Though the person behind the accounts has chosen to remain anonymous over the years, Karl’s fame has only grown, and he’s picked up a few well-known fans in the process—actresses and Broadway bombshells among them. “One of my favorite followers is Audra McDonald (@AudraEqualityMc),” he says. “Not sure how she found me all the way from NYC, but I'm ready to perform a duet any time she's up for it.” For the release of his first book, Karl the Fog: San Francisco’s Most Mysterious Resident (on sale June 11), we asked the newly published author to tell us about the best places his fans can go to pay their respects. "While you can love (or hate) me from anywhere in San Francisco, these are a few spots that rise above the rest," he says. 1. Mt. Davidson "If you're looking for my chilly embrace, this is the best place to find me. It's the highest naturally elevated spot in San Francisco, so I chill here a lot. And on a few lucky days of the year, I don't make it to the top so you can stand on the edge and look down at a sea of me." (From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books) 2. Sutro Bath / Lands End "Iconic spot to enjoy San Francisco past (Sutro Baths), present (trails around Lands End), and future (me coming in from the Pacific Ocean in about 20 minutes)." 3. Cupid's Arrow / Bay Bridge "Tony Bennett claims he left his heart in San Francisco, and anyone who stands at Cupid's Arrow and watches me sweep over the Bay Bridge on a Fogust morning could claim the same thing." (From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books) 4. Bernal Heights Park "Excellent location to watch me bubble over the hills of Noe Valley and Twin Peaks and jog toward downtown and Salesforce Tower, my new arch-nemesis." (From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books) 5. Mt. Tamalpais "Wanna get high? Like, really up there? Drive up to the top of Mt. Tam before dusk and plant yourself somewhere with a view. Watch the sun slowly set across the sky into me, creating an ocean of red and purple cotton candy."

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