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    Berlin is a town in Worcester County, Maryland, United States which includes its own historical Berlin Commercial District. The population was 4,485 at the 2010 census, and has since grown in population. It is part of the Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware Metropolitan Statistical Area.
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    Inspiration

    Three Big Festivals Go Virtual

    Summer typically initiates the music festival season with incredible line-ups, cool event spaces and dancing as if no one is watching. Many organizers have cancelled or postponed till later in the year due to this unprecedented time. However, three well-known festivals have decided to carry on by taking the events to a digital space. Participating in an online experience can’t quite be compared to an in-person event but going virtual has some benefits, such as expanding the opportunity to anyone in the world with access to an internet connection. Let’s be honest, festivals can be expensive to attend when you tally up the cost of a ticket, plus the cost of transportation, lodging, food and time off work. If you’ve been intrigued about attending one of these events but didn’t have time-off, funds or weren’t sure if it’s your kind of thing, now you’re only a screen away from uncovering what it’s all about. With these music gatherings going digital, more people from all over the globe can participate and discover the magic of coming together to enjoy these unique gatherings of music, creativity, and beauty. Tomorrowland Around the World Tomorrowland is an international electronic music festival that takes place in Boom, Belgium, which attracts some of the most important and renowned DJs and artists. Over the last few years, attendance has grown significantly reaching upwards of 400,000 fans from all over the world taking part over two weekends in July. 2020 marks the 16th anniversary of Tomorrowland and they’ve curated a festival titled Tomorrowland Around the World on a virtual magical island called Pāpiliōnem. They welcome all the “People of Tomorrow” to enjoy the incredible space filled with 3-D design technology, light and laser shows and an impressive techno, house and trance music line-up. Interacting with other festival goers attendees will be possible via games, webinars and workshops. There will be eight different stages with sets by Afrojack, Vini Vici, Steve Aoki, Martin Garrix,Yellow Claw, Charlotte de Witte, NGHTMRE, Nervo, San Holo, and Eptic, who are a sampling of over 60 artists who will perform during this two-day global event. Dates: July 25-26 between 7am-4pm PT Ticket prices: Day ticket: $14, (€12.50) Weekend ticket: $22.50 (€20.00), plus ticket packages Tickets available here.Lolla2020 Lollapalooza began in 1991 by the lead singer Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction, which initially was the farewell concert for the band. The concert was such an unexpected success it took on a life of its own touring cities throughout the United States each year until 1997. The event was revived in 2003 and since 2005 has been held in Grants Park, Chicago where fans have gathered to enjoy their favorite alternative bands, heavy metal and hip hop artists and hear up-and-coming musicians. Lollapalooza is now global with six international cities hosting a music festival, including Berlin, Germany, Santiago, Chile, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and São Paulo, Brazil. This year Chicago organizers will put on Lolla2020, a 4-day virtual festival that will include performances from different areas of Chicago, video footage from the early 1990’s debuting for the first time, along with past sets in Chicago and European and Latin American cities. The special line-up has not been announced yet so stay tuned by following their social media or subscribing to their newsletter. Dates: July 30- August 2, 2020 Ticket prices: To be announced More information here.Burning Man Burning Man, the iconic city created in Black Rock desert in Nevada each year, will be hosted online for 2020. Each year there is a theme for this participatory and collective event, which is aptly titled “Mulitiverse.” Burning man is based on the principles of self-sufficiency and “radical self-reliance” where you must bring all your food, water, clothing and shelter for the duration of your time on the playa and many would say it’s far more than just a festival. Burning Man began as a small gathering of 35 people on Baker Beach in San Francisco in 1986. In 1990, it moved to Black Rock desert where it has continued until this year with plenty of collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the local communities. Although participants won’t be in a physical landscape where they can explore on their bikes or hop on art cars, traversing the digital sphere will provide a new way to enjoy the essence and this distinct version of Burning Man. Being exposed to the natural elements is definitely a part of the experience but for those who are intimidated but curious because you’re not sure how you’ll fare with high daytime temperatures, chilly nights or sandstorms or haven’t been able to get a ticket because they sell out the moment they go on sale, going online may be a great opportunity to enter into this magical and surreal land. You can be sure there will be plenty of art, music, the unexpected, connection and an abundance of creativity. Dates: August 30- September 7, 2020 Ticket prices: TBD More information here. Lauren David is a freelance writer from the San Francisco Bay Area. She writes about food, gardening, travel, and lifestyle. When she’s not writing, she enjoys experimenting in the kitchen, road trips, and spending time near the ocean. Her work has been featured in Allrecipes, Folks, Huffpost Personal, Greatist, Trivago Magazine and more. You can find a collection of her work on her website: www.laurendavid.net.

    Inspiration

    Take a virtual tour of street art around the world

    If life is looking a bit drab without travel, add some color into your life by setting off on a street art tour around the world—virtually. Google makes it easy to revisit some of your favorite murals that you’ve come across during your travels or to encounter outdoor public artwork you’ve always wanted to see. Use the human icon to take in the murals from the street level. Enjoy a private viewing of the art displays from the safety of your couch and let these street artists transport you to destinations near and far with this virtual street art tour. Miami, Florida The largest collection of street art in the U.S can be enjoyed at the Wynwood Arts District in Miami with over 200 murals spanning 50 blocks. Shepard Fairey of Obey Giant painted one of the most well-known pieces in the Wynwood Walls open-air museum of street art. His mural features motifs about climate change, war, and more political issues. The mural faces 2nd Avenue and is visible from the street and the museum’s main entrance. Check out more of the artwork in the area on the Wynwood Walls Virtual Gallery Tour featuring murals by internationally renowned artists like Futura, Os Gemeos, Swoon, and Miss Van. Austin, Texas Spotting murals between chowing down at taco stands is a quintessential Austin experience. Order some tacos from a Mexican taqueria and browse through the city's greatest murals including the iconic mural of world-famous Texan Willie Nelson created by local muralist Wiley Ross who later added a portrait of Janis Joplin alongside Nelson. No Austin street art tour would be complete without the uber-popular “I love you so much” mural by local visual artists Amy Cook and the landmark 'Greetings from Austin' postcard mural by Todd Sanders.©Christian Mueller/Shutterstoc New York, New York New York City is home to public art displays created by some of the most famous graffiti artists on the planet. Eduardo Kobra brought his “Colors of Liberty” project to NYC with a series of gigantic murals of iconic cultural figures in vibrant hues including a Frida Khalo painting and Fight for Street Art featuring Michael Halsband’s image of Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, both in Brooklyn. Banksy slyly left a painting, ‘Hammer Boy’, on the Upper West Side. The boy is meant to represent the mischievousness of children. Keith Haring left a mark in Harlem with the anti-drug ‘Crack is Wack’ mural to warn against crack cocaine use which was rampant in the 80s when he made the painting. Puerto Rico Los Muros Hablan, meaning the walls speak, is an artist-led project to rescue the abandoned spaces of the city using art. The multicultural urban art initiative includes work from local and international artists. Look for colorful works of people and creatures from Spanish artist Aryz, Chinese artist DALeast, Mexican artist Sego, and more. ©LordRunar/Getty Images Berlin, Germany The East Side Gallery is the longest remaining piece of the Berlin Wall and has been covered in street art. You can scope out the legendary street art that spans across nearly a mile from your living room courtesy of Google. Don’t miss Russian artist Dmitri Vrubel’s ‘My God, Help Me to Survive This Deadly Love’ depicting a kiss between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and East German President Erich Honecker. Other powerful motifs include Birgit Kinder’s painting of a car breaking through the Berlin Wall. Folkestone, United Kingdom Folkestone Artworks is the largest outdoor exhibition of contemporary art in the United Kingdom. UK’s largest urban outdoor exhibition of contemporary art comprises of 74 art installations across the town including several street art murals such as Michael Craig Martin’s 'Folkestone Lightbulb' which captures the essence of energy and inspiration created by the outdoor gallery. Valparaíso, Chile The bohemian Chilean city is a cultural center for art with an epic mural art scene. Virtually follow the Street Art Route to skip the lines and view some of the most beloved street art in town. Galvez Alley is a narrow alley decked out in an explosion of color with many murals. Valpo’s Granma by Ella & Pitr is one of Valparaíso’s most famous paintings which depicts a grandmother watching over the city.Scott Beale / Laughing SquidNashville, Tennessee Nashville is known as an arts and culture hub of the United States, and the street art is no different. Art by famous local and international artists can be found on the sides of buildings all across the city. Take a Google Earth tour of the best Nashville has to offer. Next time you find yourself in Nashville, take a photo in front of the famous angel wings, painted by Kelsey Montague, in the Gulch, or the "I Believe in Nashville" murals that can be found all around the city.

    Inspiration

    10 ways to travel the world without ever leaving home

    These are trying times for travelers. Being home-bound is a most unnatural state for globetrotters. We will be able to travel again. But for now, we must stay at home to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. As we all do our part to flatten the curve we can transport ourselves to faraway locales thanks to these virtual experiences that will help you get away from the safety of your own home. 1. Learn a new language Should you feel motivated to learn a new skill while you're grounded, opt to study a language you’ve always wanted to learn. Being bilingual can help you achieve greater mental clarity and improve cultural understanding. Perhaps you want to focus on a language that is spoken in many countries such as Spanish, French, or Portuguese. Or, select a language from a country you’re eager to visit. Either way, improving your linguistic skills will help you communicate once you are able to visit and help pass the time at home. Language app Babbel was created by a team of more than 150 linguists and teachers. 2. Take virtual tours of museums Keep your sense of wanderlust alive by bringing the world to you by taking virtual tours of museums in your hometown and far off locations. Google Arts & Culture can transport you to over 1,200 museums from 80 countries. If you love art, transport yourself to some of the best art museums on the planet with virtual tours from Google Arts & Culture of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles or the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk. You can even hold a private audience with Botticelli’s Birth of Venus at the Uffizi Galleries. Go overseas by taking a tour of the Israel Museum. Develop a new artistic obsession by touring niche galleries such as the Corning Museum of Glass. 3. Lose yourself in music Music heals and in these uncertain times, artists around the globe are offering their gifts. The Metropolitan Opera in New York City is offering a free stream of its most celebrated shows. The Philharmonie Berlin opened its digital library of performances of over 600 shows to enjoy by using the code BERLINPHIL by March 31 for a 30-day access. OperaVision is showing free recorded performances from all over the world including the Royal Swedish Opera and the Polish National Opera. YouTube is a free resource to find free music from all over the world such as Calypso from the Caribbean, Flamenco from Spain, and Candombe from Uruguay. 4. Be mesmerized by wildlife Ethical animal encounters are a major motivator for travel. These nine wildlife webcams offer access to your favorite animals. You can watch giant pandas at the China Conservation & Research Center or go on a virtual safari at Tembe Elephant Park in South Africa. Watch rescued bears at the Arosa Bear Sanctuary on the bear-cam. If you don’t want to try your chances and wait to see if wildlife comes into view in the lens, watch wildlife documentaries from the countries you hope to visit in the future. Virunga will teach you about the gorillas of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Untamed Romania will introduce you to the bears of the region, and Pacificum takes you into Peru’s oceans. For pure sweetness check out the 24/7 Farmer John baby goat cam. 5. Have virtual bucket-list experiences Virtual reality can help you reach destinations you’ve always dreamed of seeing. You can reach the summit of Matterhorn Mountain in the Swiss Alps and fly over the Duomo in Florence through Google Earth's virtual reality offerings. Surround yourself with nature through the live stream of the first National Park in the U.S., Yellowstone and the live feed of the Upper Yosemite Falls. Hike the Great Wall of China from the Jinshanling to Simatai sections without breaking a sweat. Take a virtual tour via webcams of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and watch Kīlauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes. 6. Travel through your taste buds Many cooking classes are being offered digitally from the homes of chefs around the world and through food tours. In Florence, Italy, Il Salviatino’s Executive Chef, Silvia Grossi, is leading cooking lessons on Instagram from her home kitchen with easy recipes using ingredients you likely already have at home. Iberostar’s Honest Food how-to recipe videos offer healthy multicultural fare that you can whip up at home to travel the world through flavors including Yucca and Chicken Tamales and Vegan Tiramisu. Find inspiration by watching My World Kitchen where children show you how to make traditional dishes from their countries or binge-watch Anthony Bourdain's Parts Unknown (Netflix) and Emeril's Eat the World (Amazon Prime). 7. Have a video date with a foreigner There’s no time like the present to give love a chance. Fairytrail is a dating app for travelers and focuses on video chats. Connect with someone who interests you and learn about their culture and customs through their own experience, and share yours. If love sparks you’ll have a romantic trip to look forward to after society has healed from COVID-19 8. Unwind with a travel movie It’s no secret that movies are the best distraction. Find titles from countries you want to visit or re-watch old favorites and be transported to your dream destinations. Check out our reader-recommended list of travel movies. If you like rom-coms, watch Under the Tuscan Sun (Hulu) or Mamma Mia (Netflix). For drama and vistas of European mountains watch The Grand Budapest Hotel (Amazon Prime). If you’re craving the beautiful beaches of Southeast Asia watch The Beach (Amazon Prime). Or catch up on travel documentaries for a bit more of a realistic take on the destinations you’re dreaming of such as Encounters at the End of the World (Amazon Prime) filmed in Antarctica and Under An Arctic Sky (Amazon Prime) to see people surf under the Northern Lights. 9. Pick up a travel-centric book From true-adventure non-fiction travel novels to travel guides about the destination you're yearning to visit, now is a great time dive into some travel literature. Read guide books from our sister site, Lonely Planet. For inspiration, check out our list of 10 books every traveler should read. We won’t judge you if you want to re-read Eat, Pray, Love in these uncertain times and get swept away by intoxicating destinations, food, and passion. 10. Plan your dream trip There’s so much uncertainty around the world right now but one thing we’re confident about is that travel will make a comeback. After being cooped on for what seems like the indefinite future, we will once again explore the globe. COVID-19 has stalled travel plans but that doesn’t mean you can’t seek inspiration for your future adventures. Prepare for when future dream travels are made possible again by browsing Lonely Planet's destination guides for ideas when creating your itinerary. Read about the history of the destination, research which sites you want to visit, where you want to have your morning coffee, and locate boutiques for finding the perfect keepsake. Lola Méndez is an Uruguayan-American freelance journalist. She writes about sustainability, travel, culture, and wellness for many print and digital publications in addition to her responsible travel blog, MissFilatelista.com. She's a full-time globetrotter who travels to develop her own worldview and has explored over 60 countries. Passionate about sustainable travel, she seeks out ethical experiences that benefit local communities. You can follow her on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

    Inspiration

    Where to Travel for the Best Canadian Wine

    Despite its chilly reputation, Canadian wine has been winning awards and making a name for itself for years. That includes chardonnay from Prince Edward County, appellation wine in Nova Scotia and everything from full-bodied reds to crisp whites in the Okanagan Valley. Although the wine is often super affordable (think $15-$20 CAD a bottle with little to no tasting fees – that’s about $11.50 to $15 USD!) it still tends to be exclusive, since many wineries only sell their wine from the tasting room. So traveling to the wine is often your best bet, and luckily, Canada has a lot to offer. These are the best Canadian wine regions worth busting out your passport for. Okanagan Valley, British Columbia The Okanagan Valley is Canada’s only desert, with dry, hot (really!) summers and cool evenings. With more than 185 wineries, the Okanagan Valley is British Columbia’s largest wine region by far, and the second most productive in Canada. Four different sub-regions exist in this stretch of land and the soil is ripe for many different wine varietals, including merlot, pinot gris, syrahs and rieslings. The area attracts a diversity of winemakers, too. The first indigenous-owned and operated winery in North America, Nk’Mip Cellars, is at the southern end of the Okanagan in the town of Osoyoos. Their chardonnay won gold at the Chardonnay du Monde in 2018. Just 20 minutes north in Oliver, two brothers who immigrated from Punjab, India, now run the small but successful Kismet Estate Winery, which won more than a dozen awards in 2018 for everything from their syrah and malbec reserve to their rosė – all while selling the majority of their grapes to other winemakers in the area. And the area’s features are strong enough that vintner Severine Pinte left France to be the winemaker and viticulturist LaStella Winery since 2010. Prince Edward County, Ontario Two hours east of Toronto, Prince Edward County is a popular escape for Canadians and New Yorkers alike thanks to their nearly 500 miles of sandy shoreline. When it comes to wine, they’re still the new kids in town, though they have 40+ wineries and have spent the last two decades building their reputation as top-notch winemakers. The region is known for their pinot noir and chardonnay, whose vines they painstakingly bury underground at the end of each harvest to keep safe from the icy winters. Both Rosehall Run’s 2017 JCR Pinot Noir Rosehall and their 2016 Cabernet Franc Single won gold at the National Wine Awards of Canada, and the area has had a string of awards against international competitors as well. Bunches of wine grapes waiting for frost for ice wine harvest in Ontario © Horst Petzold | Dreamstime.com Niagara, Ontario Niagara is one of the better-known wine regions in Canada, most famous for their ice wines – a syrupy-sweet drink made from grapes left on the vine into winter, where temperatures have to reach -8 degrees celsius before they’re harvested. The seasonally frigid temperatures around the Great Lakes are especially well-situated to make this kind of wine, which is why Niagara has grown its vintner reputation on it. If you’re hoping for more than a dessert drink when touring wine country, two of Niagara’s rieslings took home gold at 2019’s Decanter World Wine Awards, and the baco noir from Sue-Ann Staff Estate Winery won bronze at the 2019 Berlin International Wine Competition. To get around, you can drive, ride on a double-decker bus, or try one of the increasingly popular cycling tours. The Eastern Townships, Quebec The Eastern Townships, a collection of small cities and towns that sits two hours east of Montreal, is already a popular all-seasons getaway for New Englanders. Golf, water sports, skiing, cycling, four provincial parks and a high concentration of spas make it an easy choice when folks nearby need an escape. The elegant architecture and largely Francophone population make it feel much farther from the US than it actually is. The area is also responsible for the majority of Quebec’s local wine. One of the best ways to get a taste for the region is via their Wine Route, which follows more than 20 vineyards in the Brome-Missisquoi region. You won’t have to worry about finding your way around, as the entire 140 km (that’s about 87 miles) route is marked. Standout vineyards include Vignoble de l’Orpailleur, which has won numerous international awards for their ice wine, and Vignoble Domaine des Côtes d’Ardoise, Quebec’s first vineyard, which has mastered everything from reds to rosés and ciders over the years. Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia This area is perhaps better known for the Bay of Fundy, which has the highest tides on earth – sometimes as high as 56 feet – and regularly has 15 different species of whales swim by. It’s so special that it’s been named one of the seven wonders of North America, alongside other spots like the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls. But Annapolis Valley, which runs alongside the Bay of Fundy, has its own bragging rights, too. Home to the bulk of Nova Scotia’s wineries (11 of 18) you’d be remiss not to try Nova Scotia’s Tidal Bay appellation wine while visiting. This crisp white showcases the cool climate and oceanic influence, and uses a blend of white wines that must be grown in the Nova Scotia region. This year, Annapolis Valley vineyard Lightfoot and Wolfville won the award for Best Winery at the 2019 Atlantic Canadian Wine Awards as well as took home several different awards for their vintages, including a tied win for the Tidal Bay of the year.

    Inspiration

    5 Ways You Can Celebrate the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    Berlin is a vibrant city known for its energy, art scene and historical past. This November marks the 30th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall signifying freedom and peace. With that momentous anniversary, Berliners and visitors from around the world will be celebrating throughout the month of November. Festivities will range from guided tours and memorials to art installations and festivals surrounding the division of Berlin, the Cold War and the Peaceful Revolution of 1989. Here are some must-see highlights that will be debuting in the coming weeks. Arts Festival From November 4th to the 10th, Berlin will be transformed into an incredible open-air exhibition. The city’s revolution will be commemorated at historic locations with large archive film and image projections, installations, concerts, lectures and more. The festival will conclude on the evening of November 9th at Brandenburg Gate, when the entire city will become the largest concert stage in the world. It will feature legendary musicians, bands and people that were involved in the Peaceful Revolution. Don’t miss the floating art installation made up of 30,000 handwritten messages by Patrick Shearn of Poetic Kinetics. Post-concert, the festivities will continue through the night with dance parties in 27 clubs across Berlin. Because what’s Berlin without a dance party? Guided Tours Tour operators throughout the city are prepared for the influx of tourists visiting Berlin to commemorate the end of divided Germany. Whether you prefer biking, walking or riding in a bus, local tour operators are ready to take you back in time and teach you about the country’s exquisite history. GetYourGuide provides dozens of tours throughout Berlin, including an excursion based upon the secrets of the Communist Capital. During this walking outing, you’ll learn about life behind the Iron Curtain and the secrets of the Stasi secret police. Visit the embassies of four Cold War powers and discover crossing points of the Berlin Wall. The Palace of Tears is one famous border crossing point between East and West Berlin that has since become a museum with exhibitions about Berlin during the Cold War. Hotels have also jumped on board by offering tours in Berlin. Located in the former Western part of the city right near the border, Orania.Berlin is offering a special package in honor of the anniversary. It includes a two-hour tour of the Berlin Wall (which can be done by bike) for guests to learn about the history of the city's division, the struggle for freedom and the process of reunification. Train Trip Why not book an entire trip to learn about Germany’s fascinating history? Well Inntravel has made it pretty easy to do just that with their self-guided rail train, Beyond the Iron Curtain. Journey by rail between the iconic cities of Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden to discover how they emerged from the cloak of the Iron Curtain. Stay two nights in each city using Inntravel walking notes to marvel at their enduring cultural treasures. In Berlin, follow a route that traces its history taking in the magnificently restored Reichstag, Brandenburg Gate and the Wall. Continue to Leipzig, best known for music, but where locals staged the largest protest demonstration in East German history. Last is Dresden which has risen from the ashes and been restored to its former glory. The package includes 6 nights’ accommodations, rail travel between Berlin-Leipzig-Dresden and city walking tour notes.Museums & Exhibits There are loads of museums and exhibits that are honoring the anniversary of the fall of the Wall. The Wall Museum East Side Gallery tells the full picture of the story of the Wall from the reasons for building the Wall to its dramatic fall in 1989. Their new exhibit is a multi-media experience that uses more than one hundred screens and projectors to guide viewers through the division of Germany. It chronicles the stories of how the wall changed people’s lives. And shows a unique perspective into the unknown side of the Cold War, showcasing the different perspectives from both the East and West by using newsreels from the 1960’s. If you want to be immersed in the history of Germany’s tumultuous past, this exhibit is surely where to do just that. 3D Reality Experience Augmented reality app MauAR, brings the Wall to life and allows users to visualize the division of Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Users can use the app in the camera view of their smartphone or tablet to point at spots where the wall previously stood to go back in time. Users can jump between three points in time – 1961, 1971 and 1981. The app will also debut five special episodes that will recount the story of the Berlin Wall and key moments in the history of the Peaceful Revolution. For example, users can travel back in time to the demonstration held on Alexanderplatz on November 4th, 1989.

    Inspiration

    5 Wacky European Attractions You Probably Haven’t Visited (Yet!)

    If you’re looking for visitor attractions with a difference, you may be interested in a list of Europe’s most underrated attractions. Author and comedian Danny Wallace has unveiled an alternative guide to exploring Europe in collaboration with train and coach app Trainline, based on research it conducted with vacationers. It found that 45 percent of travelers now demand an “authentic experience” while on vacation, and 26 percent cited “crowds of tourists” as their biggest travel irritation. This was followed by overpriced tourist traps at 24 percent and lines (14 percent) at more popular attractions. “A lifelong fascination of the unusual, unfamiliar and obscure experiences the world has to offer means that I’ve spent the last decade writing about some of the most incredible places and people I’ve met on my travels – often on long train journeys through the breathtaking landscapes of Europe,” says Danny Wallace. Here are the top five attractions selected as the most overlooked in Europe, and to see the rest of the top 30, please visit here. 1. The David Hasselhoff Museum Topping the list, the Berlin-based shrine dedicated to the life and works of “The Hoff” can be found in the basement of the Circus Hostel. A true project of passion, it pays homage to the cult star, courtesy of rare multilingual memorabilia and a wall mural of the man himself. It once sported “strokable” chest hair that has since been stolen by overzealous fans, and Hasselhoff himself paid a visit there in 2017. 2. Floating Cat Sanctuary The world’s only floating animal sanctuary is a refuge for Amsterdam’s stray and abandoned cats. With the chance to admire and play with hundreds of cute, sometimes grumpy and often feisty felines, the modern sanctuary was originally the home of the capital’s famous “cat lady,” Mrs. v. Weelde. 3. Mini Europe A one-of-a-kind shrunken wonderland located on the outskirts of Brussels. Mini Europe offers a Lilliputian view of over 350 miniatures. These represent iconic, important and culturally relevant landmarks across the continent. 4. Subterranean Art Gallery Sometimes referred to as “the world’s longest art gallery,” more than 90 stations in Stockholm that span the underground transport network form part of the Subterranean Art Gallery. They feature an awe-inspiring array of paintings, installations and sculptures. With the subterranean rockface acting as a canvas, this hidden gem offers a truly breathtaking experience beneath the city. 5. Museum of Alchemists and Magicians In a city brimming with history, the Museum of Alchemists and Magicians in Prague brings to light the darker side of the Czech capital’s fantastical past. Featuring genuine artifacts and antiquities from alchemists and magicians past, you can enter the world of some of the most famous dabblers in the dark arts.Get inspired to travel everyday by signing up to Lonely Planet’s daily newsletter.

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    DESTINATION IN Delaware

    Southern Delaware

    Delaware ( (listen) DEL-ə-wair) is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Maryland to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean to its east. The state takes its name from the nearby Delaware River named after Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.Delaware occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula and some islands and territory within the Delaware River. It is the second-smallest and sixth-least populous state, but also the sixth-most densely populated. Delaware's largest city is Wilmington, while the state capital is Dover, the second-largest city in the state. The state is divided into three counties, having the lowest number of any state; from north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex County. While the southern two counties have historically been predominantly agricultural, New Castle is more urbanized. In a similar vein to Maryland, Delaware's geography, culture, and history combine elements of the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, and Southern regions of the country. Before its coastline was explored by Europeans in the 16th century, Delaware was inhabited by several groups of Native Americans, including the Lenape in the north and Nanticoke in the south. It was initially colonized by Dutch traders at Zwaanendael, near the present town of Lewes, in 1631. Delaware was one of the Thirteen Colonies that took part in the American Revolution. On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, and has since been known as The First State. Since the turn of the 20th century, Delaware is also a de facto onshore corporate haven, in which by virtue of its corporate laws, the state is the domicile of over 50% of all NYSE-listed business and 60% of the Fortune 500.