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  • BRANT POINT LIGHT w BEACH ROSES and SAND 2 cr Jamie Holmes NANTUCKETMA small
  • Harbor Houses in quiet and calm Sunset in Nantucket Island
  • NANTUCKET MA credit Emily Elisabeth 17 small
  • MAIN STREET NANTUCKETMA credit William De Sousa Mauk 30 small
  • STEPS BEACH w STAIRS 3 NANTUCKETMA credit Jamie Holmes small
  • NANTUCKET MA 2020 OUTDOOR DINING at The Club Car credit Nantucket Chamber Emily Elisabeth 28 small
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    Nantucket,

    Massachusetts

    Nantucket Island Chamber of Commerce / Jamie Holmes

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    Visit Nantucket — Eat! Play! Stay!

    Crescent-moon shaped Nantucket comprises 50 square miles including its main Town and several neighborhoods, such as the eastern shore’s renowned and popular Siasconset. Nantucket has no traffic lights and is rural in character. Nearly 50% of Nantucket is conservation land making it appealing for birders, hikers and walkers. There are more than two dozen gorgeous beaches, some facing the Atlantic and popular with surfers. The Town’s 800+ pre-Civil War structures are responsible for the entire island is a National Historic Landmark.

    The island’s population is 14,255 residents (August 2021 estimate) however, during summer (particularly July and August), the population swells to 50-60,000. Nantucket’s mid-Atlantic climate is warmer in winter and cooler in summer than the mainland. It is Massachusetts’ outpost in the Atlantic and that “apart-ness” endows the island with a unique mystique and charm which have enchanted visitors for generations.

    Boating, beachcombing, fishing, kayaking/SUP, golf, hiking, cycling, shopping, off-road adventures, visiting the island’s brewery, vineyard and distillery, bird-watching, visiting museums and historic sites, shopping, art classes, theater, antiques shopping, photography, seagoing excursions, harbor and whale watching tours, culinary tours and dining, surfing, surfcasting, lighthouse excursions, cultural talks and walking tours, plein air painting, yoga are all popular pastimes.

    Nantucket Island Chamber of Commerce is the official visitor and travel trade portal for the island of Nantucket. Chamber staff is here to serve any request, provide travel information, outreaching to the media and travel trade domestically and internationally.

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    Nantucket Articles

    News

    Travel News: 100 Travel Discounts You’ll Love, Streaming Audio From the National Parks, You Can Afford Nantucket

    From a discounted African safari to a plate of Massachusetts scallops, from a tour of the art of Florence to the sound of a mountain stream delivered right to your earbuds, this week’s travel news is all about pushing boundaries and seeing more. 100 TRAVEL DISCOUNTS YOU’LL LOVE This news takes the concept of Shoulder Season to the next level. The United States Tour Operators Association’s (USTOA) Travel Together Month (September 1 - 30) will offer exclusive savings, perks and airfare deals on dozens and dozens of amazing trips around the world. “Cruises, safaris, walking tours, independent trips, and more… Travel Together Month includes a wide variety of live-like-a-local experiences in countries around the world” said Terry Dale, president and CEO of USTOA. From art and culture in European cities to wildlife in Africa and the South Pacific, these trips are high-end experiences with seriously discounted price tags, often saving travelers $1,000 per person. STREAMING AUDIO FROM THE NATIONAL PARKS Love America’s national parks? Well, listen up, people. Seriously.  Listen. The National Park Foundation, the official charity partner of the National Park Service, has just launched PARKTRACKS, an audio streaming experience that can (virtually) transport you to your favorite national parks any time. The National Park Service’s Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division captured unique audio experiences such as waterways, wildlife, and more at national parks across the country, available to download or stream online at Find Your Park. YES, YOU CAN AFFORD NANTUCKET You already know that the island of Nantucket, off the coast of Cape Cod, is gorgeous, popular, and pricey in summer. But did you know that the island’s population drops from 80,000 to 10,000 when vacationers head home for the fall? That leaves miles of beach and fun events like the Cranberry Festival, Half Marathon, and the opening of Nantucket Bay Scallop Season, plus plummeting hotel prices and shorter lines for Juice Bar’s ice cream (try the Crantucket, with cranberry ice cream and chocolate chunks) and seafood at Toppers and Brant Point Grill.

    Road Trips

    Ultimate Art Lover’s New England Road Trip

    Each time my family drives into Bennington, Vermont, it feels a little like coming home. Though I’ve never lived in this little town for more than a few days at a time on vacation, it strikes a deep, familiar chord with me. Perhaps arriving in Bennington feels like home to me because, as a boy growing up in the Bronx, I recall vividly my first discovery of the great American painter Anna Mary Robertson, better known as Grandma Moses, who lived and worked in Bennington. The gentle curves of the Green Mountains just outside of town provide a soothing natural backdrop to this historic place, and they are the very mountains that appear in Grandma Moses’s folk paintings, depicting rural life and seasonal rituals such as sugar-mapling and trick-or-treating. The interplay between the natural world and the art world is at the very heart of this short and totally manageable road trip. DAY 1: BENNINGTON, VERMONT Bennington offers a range of accommodations, but we’ve become fond of the family-friendly Knotty Pine Motel, which has a dog-friendly policy, a very attentive and helpful staff, and a lovely swing set and pool. We especially appreciate the big map of New England that hangs in the main office. My youngest daughter kept asking to go visit the map, and I was so pleased that she’d connected with New England, tracing her finger over my sister’s home in New Hampshire, the beaches of Falmouth and Nantucket where we’ve visited, and the charming little city of New Bedford. It was only later that I realized that my daughter was actually less interested in the map and much more interested in the bowl of Tootsie Rolls the motel proprietor kept on her desk. Oh, well. The map is still a sweet memory, even if the candy was sweeter. In Bennington, the must-see for art lovers is the Bennington Museum and Grandma Moses Schoolhouse. Here, you can view a wide variety of art in a charming and manageable setting. The museum’s permanent collection includes fine art, furniture, and household items from Vermont’s history as well as strikingly modern work by contemporary Bennington artists. The rooms devoted to Grandma Moses (the largest public collection of the “primitive” artist’s work) offer you the chance to see the Green Mountains in Moses’s iconic paintings or rural life and then peek out the window and see the real thing. Unforgettable. The adjoining one-room Grandma Moses Schoolhouse includes chalk-boards and antique schoolbooks, games, and dress-up clothes. If you’re traveling with kids, they may be more enthralled by the schoolhouse than the art, and that’s fine: Let them go. They’ll remember how that schoolhouse made them feel long after they’ve forgotten your lectures on folk art. In 1777, Bennington was the site of a major Revolutionary War battle, and each August, the town celebrates with a parade. Residents and visitors alike line the streets and cheer for the bands and marchers. We’ve been lucky enough to time our visits to parade weekend, and it is a nice way to meet the town’s year-round residents. Don’t be fooled by the name. Kevin’s Sports Pub and Restaurant, in North Bennington, is much more than a place to watch a game on TV. We love its imaginative riffs on burgers, fish and chips, and other pub fare, and the local ales on tap offer a variety of vibrant flavors and textures. In nearby South Shaftsbury, the Robert Frost Stone House Museum surprises, delights, and educates visitors with Frost’s famous poetry, such as “The Road Not Taken,” adorning the walls, with brief, easily digested lessons on his rhyme schemes and meter that even young kids will understand and appreciate. (If you’re headed for the Atlantic coast, drop by another Frost museum, his farmhouse in Derry, New Hampshire, on the way.) Psst! Outside Bennington, there’s a hidden gem of a local lake whose name I promised not to publish because its modest snack bar and canoe rental business are really meant for locals. If you find yourself in conversation with a Bennington local, do ask about places to canoe. We had a family paddling adventure on the lake and down a nearby creek that we’ll never forget. DAY 2: WILLIAMSTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS Williamstown, just across the border into Massachusetts down U.S. 7, is another town where you can easily stay more than one night just to drink in all the art and natural beauty on display. The Clark Art Institute is home not only to a world-class permanent collection that includes European and American art from the Renaissance to the early 20th century (especially rich in work by American painters Winslow Homer, George Inness, and John Singer Sargent), but also to one of the finest museum snack bars I’ve ever experienced. For real. I recommend its salads and sandwiches, especially in good weather when you can eat out on a terrace. The museum’s grounds, including a children’s learning center, are a work of art themselves (they made Architectural Digest’s list of “buzz-worthy” museums). Williams College Museum of Art is another fine collection; focused on the college’s mission, the museum offers a broad range of pieces, from ancient Egyptian art to contemporary American and international work. Williamstown Theatre Festival has been bringing acclaimed productions to the Berkshires each summer since 1955, another example of the exciting synergy between the natural world and human creativity that makes this region so special. Williams Inn is a cozy place in the heart of Williamstown to rest your head in the Berkshires, having welcomed visitors since 1909. As with Bennington before it, you may want to stay more than one night to see all the sights. DAY 3: NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS The cherry on top of your art lover’s road trip is the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), in North Adams. The nearby mountains and small-town vibe on the streets are a contrast to the hot, ultra-modern work you’ll encounter inside this restored 19th-century mill complex. The museum is an epicenter for the making of visual and performing arts, with residencies that bring cutting-edge creators to town. New exhibits of contemporary artists, including the museum’s Kidspace, are ongoing; check the museum’s excellent website, massmoca.org, for updates. When you’re ready to refuel, MASS MoCA’s Lickety Split lobby bistro is open during museum hours for breakfast and lunch (plus ice cream, espresso, fresh-squeezed lemonade, and, on show nights, a light dinner menu). The cute streets of North Adams also teem with international cuisine, funky cafés and coffee spots, and cool pubs.  Ready to hit the hay? The Porches Inn at MASS MoCA is self-consciously kitschy. (In keeping with the museum’s mission, the inn describes itself as “retro-edgy, industrial granny chic.”) You’ll enjoy closing your little hipster eyes in the imaginative heart of the Berkshires. BOOK YOUR HOTEL WITH BUDGET TRAVEL You can find and book a great hotel deal right at Budget Travel's Book a Hotel page.

    Travel Tips

    How to Find Shoulder Season Bargains for Fall

    Fall is on the way, and that means Shoulder Season bargains. We've put together this cheat sheet, based on recent trends and our best expert intel, for autumn savings: 1. "SHOULDER SEASON," DEMYSTIFIED We call this time of year Shoulder Season because, in a lot of popular destinations, it’s between the high summer season and the low winter season. The weather is perfect in September and October, but the summer crowds are gone. We'll see airfares and hotel rates drop in popular summer destinations as summer turns to fall, including beach towns, National Parks, theme parks, and European cities. 2. HOW TO BOOK A FALL HOTEL DEAL To take advantage of lower Shoulder Season rates, you've got to do your homework: Visit a web resource (such as our Book a Hotel page) and compare rates from late August and early September (a.k.a., right now) with rates a few weeks later. You'll often see hotels in popular summer destinations, including the Jersey Shore, New England, and the Carolinas, drop their rates by as much as half as summer turns to fall. You may find that already reasonable destinations, like Myrtle Beach, become even more affordable in fall, and pricier spots like Nantucket can be within reach  of Budget Travelers. Pounce on a rate that's right for you. 3. VACATION RENTALS CAN SAVE YOU BIG But if you're traveling in a party of more than four people, a vacation rental like HomeAway or Airbnb may be the way to go. Don't be put off by rates over $200/night until you've compared the rental to the cost of two (or more) hotel rooms. A spokesperson for HomeAway recently let us know that they are seeing savings of 10 percent or more on Shoulder Season bookings. 4. KNOW THE BEST TIME TO BUY PLANE TICKETS This is actually the question we get asked most often is: When is the best time to buy plane tickets. The answer has been, traditionally, roughly two months ahead of your flight -- that's typically when airlines have lowered fares as much as they are going to. But as we've reported, the rules of airline bargains are evolving. Of course, for travel in September and October, we're already past that window, so the best day to book a flight might be...right now. Our partners at Skyscanner crunched the numbers for fall travel and noted that late August (this week, actually) may be the best time to book a Thanksgiving flight, with decent savings also available to those who book during the month of September. 5. FOLLOW YOUR FAVORITE TRAVEL BRANDS ON SOCIAL MEDIA We also always recommend following all the major airlines, hotels, and package tour companies on social media and to sign up for their e-newsletters, so you'll be among the first to learn about flash sales and deals. And, right on cue, airlines will start rolling out Shoulder Season sales in September - happy travels!

    Budget Travel Lists

    10 Cheap Fall Beaches You'll Love

    To tell the truth, here at Budget Travel we've never signed off on the notion that beach season ends on Labor Day. Balmy beach breezes, warm sun, and lobster rolls remain available well into October. And one of the benefits of hitting the shore in autumn is affordable hotel rates, putting dream destinations like Hilton Head, Montauk, Laguna Beach, and even Nantucket within your reach. Here, 10 of our favorite American beach towns with fall rates that say, "Welcome!" 1. HILTON HEAD South Carolina Warm beaches, warm welcome—plus pirates! With fall temperatures in the 70s and 80s, miles of pristine lowcountry beaches, and the utterly unique Gullah culture, Hilton Head is truly like no other beach town in America. Learn more about what makes the island special at the Coastal Discovery Museum, or discover it for yourself on a quiet beach. If you're traveling with kids, don't miss Pirates of Hilton Head Island, with its ride aboard the Black Dagger ship. Or take a deep breath and explore the island on ZipLine Hilton Head's two-hour sky-high tour! 2. SAUGATUCK Michigan Step back in time in this sleepy Lake Michigan town Picket fences, a 19th-century vibe, and not a chain restaurant in sight. Saugatuck is one of the places savvy Chicagoans go to get away from the big city. Before you can plant yourself on Oval Beach, you've got to hop a hand-cranked ferry across the Kalamazoo River. 3.LAGUNA BEACH California Live the SoCal beach dream No, you don't have to surf just because you're on an iconic seven-mile stretch of Southern California sea and sand, but you can take a group surfing lesson for $75 with a guarantee that you'll "get up" on your board. Nearby Laguna Village offers excellent art galleries and shops, a nod to this gorgeous beach town's roots as an artists' colony. 4. BAY ST. LOUIS Mississippi Gulf beaches, fresh seafood, and art galleries One of Budget Travel's Coolest Small Towns in America 2013, Bay St. Louis was hit hard by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 but has done more than recover since then. Explore Historic Old Town, go fishing, and take a walking tour of 19th-century homes, Creole cottages, and galleries, or just take Main Street straight down to the beach. 5. POINT PLEASANT BEACH New Jersey The lines for the roller coaster and zeppoli are way shorter in September! One of Budget Travel's Coolest Small Towns in America 2018, Point Pleasant Beach is, well, pleasant enough in summer if you enjoy being part of a major scene, rubbing elbows with in-the-know New Yorkers, Philadelphians, and Jersey girls and boys who love Jenkinson's Boardwalk and the lovely stretch of beach here. But come September, the rides stay open, the cotton candy is just as sweet, but rates for hotel rooms just a block from the beach can be literally a third of the summer price. 6. PORT TOWNSEND Washington Old-timey seaport in the Pacific Northwest We love the harbor and the foodie scene in this Victorian-era Olympic coast seaport, which was one of our Coolest Small Towns last year. A sea kayaker's dream town, Port Townsend also boasts nearby mountains for hiking and biking, and is an especially great place to cast for fish. 7. KEY WEST Florida You can't go any farther—or ask for a more beautiful location—down the East Coast Well-known as one of Ernest Hemingway's favorite locales—with a party reputation to match—this gorgeous spot at the waaaaaaaaaay bottom of the U.S.'s East Coast boasts a much wider variety of activities, including tours of Victorian homes, nature kayaking, and unique art galleries. Sunset-watching here is not mandatory, but thoroughly recommended. No matter how cliché, it never gets old. 8. MONTAUK New York Parkland and board shorts at the very end of Long Island's East End Sure, this dreamy beach town at the tip of New York's Long Island has gone a bit more upscale over the years, with some classic motels closing and serious eateries moving in. But with only 17 square miles bounded by water and 40 percent of the land devoted to state and county parkland, this place is still pretty wild, and one stop at the Ditch Plains beach and its surfing scene will make you feel as if you've traveled back to the days when trekking the 100+ miles from NYC kept most folks away. 9. LAHAINA Hawaii A hoppin' main street in paradise For some people, the words "beautiful beach" and Maui are synonymous, and it's difficult to argue. But you'll also find a beautiful town—Hawaii's former capital, Lahaina—on the unparalleled island, with one of the U.S.'s most thriving main streets, the result, in part, of the 19th century whaling industry, for which Lahaina served as something of an unofficial capital as well. Nearby Kaanapali Beach, mountains you can almost reach out and touch, and a tranquil harbor make Lahaina a perfect town for kicking back. 10. NANTUCKET Massachusetts Eighteenth-century architecture meets 21st-century style "See what a real corner of the world it occupies; how it stands there, away off shore, more lonely than the Eddystone lighthouse," wrote Herman Melville about Nantucket in Moby-Dick. This charmingly whale-shaped island still holds its lonely position off the coast of Cape Cod, but of course these days the whaling captains, sailors, and harpooners who made the island home two centuries ago have been replaced by captains of industry who can meet the sky-high summer rates. But things cool down literally and figuratively come September, when you can have perfect beaches, 18th-century cobblestone streets lined with contemporary galleries—and a table with a view—to yourself. (And don't miss the Nantucket Historical Association, with its beautifully designed whaling exhibits and exceptional docents, in the heart of downtown.)

    News

    Gamble on a flight from New York to the Hamptons

    Andre Balazs' Standard hotel in Manhattan is launching a summer seaplane service to the Hamptons, and is offering passengers the option to play its "Flight Board" game for a shot at seats as low as $30. The flights are on board a bright red, eight-passenger Cessna seaplane called StndAir. Passengers can sign up to play the Flight Board for a chance to book off-peak flights between 9 a.m. and 7p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Flight Board flights are also available Sunday mornings and Mondays after noon. "Seat prices increase as the plane becomes full, so join early for the best rates," the StndAir website advises. "Your flight can be bumped off the board if someone takes your desired time slot and charters the entire plane in full, or gets seven friends onboard before you do." Flights on the Flight Board that depart on Friday, July 1, for the Fourth of July weekend, for instance, currently range from $30 to $295 each way, depending on how full the flights are, and contingent on them filling up and later bookers being willing to throw down even more. Flight Board destinations include East Hampton, Shelter Island, Montauk and Nantucket. And while the Flight Board offers a chance for seats as low as $30, regularly scheduled flights between New York and East Hampton cost $495 each way with between one and four departures daily, depending on the date. The service started this past Memorial Day weekend and runs through Oct., 2011. The StndAir is available for charter service to any East Coast destination within a 300-mile radius of New York, which includes Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard and Cape Cod in Massachusetts, as well as the Hudson Valley. The plane is operated by Shoreline Aviation as part of their FAA Part135 Air Carrier Operations. Flights depart from and land at New York Skyports Marina, located at 2430 FDR Drive on the East River at 23rd Street (the dock is to the left of the Gulf Gas Station at 23rd Street). More from Budget Travel: Will you be flying this summer? Summer fares: Book now or wait? 10 Beach Products You Never Knew You Needed

    Inspiration

    What's America's Best Waterfront Restaurant?

    Whether you go for shacks or top shelf, you probably agree that summer and seafood go together like a hammock and a sizzlin' read. Put a seafood joint next to a perfect beach, by the shores of a quiet creek, or hugging the end of a historic wharf and you've got the kind of place you'll dream about all winter. We need your help! Tell us about your favorite waterfront restaurant and we may include it in a future Budget Travel story. Here, to get the beach ball boppin', my highly subjective, by-no-means-scientific short list of fabulous American seafood joints by the water. Yeah, two of my picks are in Maine and one is in the Bronx—you got a problem with that? Santa Barbara Shellfish Company. At the end of the wharf with views of the Pacific and fresh locally caught seafood, this is the place you want to be at the end of a SoCal day (230 Stearns Wharf, Santa Barbara, Calif., sbfishhouse.com, Dungeness crab Louie $17.95). Johnny's Famous Reef Restaurant. Look, I grew up in the Bronx and there's no way I can leave the amazing City Island (the "Nantucket of the Bronx") off this list and still hold my head high. Johnny's is at the tip of the island with views of Long Island Sound and knockout fried lobster tails, chowder, and even frogs' legs (2 City Island Ave., Bronx, N.Y., johnnysreefrestaurant.com, fried lobster tails $27). The Lobster Shack at Two Lights. Located on what Budget Travel has called one of New England's "other" capes—Cape Elizabeth—this is the place to grab a classic New England lobster roll and a bowl of chowder by the ocean (225 Two Lights Rd, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, lobstershacktwolights.com, lobster roll market price). LuLu's. On Alabama's Intracoastal Waterway, Lulu's is a Gulf Coast riff on the seaside seafood shack with cold beer, great burgers, and local seafood (200 East 25th Avenue, Gulf Shores, Ala., lulusathomeport.com, shrimp basket $16.99). Cantler's Riverside Inn. On Mill Creek, near Annapolis City Dock, Cantler's specializes in—what else?—Maryland crabs (458 Forest Beach Rd., Annapolis, Md., cantlers.com, fried crab cakes $25).

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