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    Fremont,

    Nebraska

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    Fremont is a city and county seat of Dodge County in the eastern portion of the state of Nebraska in the Midwestern United States. The population was 26,397 at the 2010 census. Fremont is the home of Midland University.
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    InspirationRediscover AmericaTravel Tips

    Most affordable destinations for New Years Eve 2022

    Priceline.com has released a list of the most affordable NYE destinations around the USA. *Based on average round-trip ticket costs and average daily hotel rates for travel anytime between December 17, 2021 - January 1, 2022. Most affordable round trip flights Times Square in NYC. Credit: schalkm, Getty Images 1. New York ($312) The ball drop in Times Square is a rite of passage, and Manhattan tends to go all out for new years eve festivities. 2. Las Vegas ($314) Vegas throws great parties! Our recommendation for NYE is this affordable 80s and 90s dance party on Fremont Street (must be 21+). Buy tickets here. 3. Fort Lauderdale ($317) Celebrate the new year in downtown Fort Lauderdale, which will have a band, free street festival, and a brilliant fireworks display at midnight. 4. Chicago ($319) Chicago has a new year's party for everyone. We count almost 30 different options for you to celebrate on the official city website, ChooseChicago. 5. Atlanta ($326) Atlanta celebrates the new year with a college football bonanza. Check out the Chic-fil-a Peach Bowl, and then celebrate your favorite team into next year. Most affordable hotels Credit: Sean Pavone, Getty Images 1. Las Vegas ($130) Say what you want about Vegas, it knows how to throw a party! Our recommendation? Dance the night away and then find a cheap hotel off the strip. Travelers can find great deals in Las Vegas on Priceline.com. 2. Pigeon Forge ($139) Pigeon Forge's Winterfest is a great family-friendly place to ring in the new year. The city puts up over 5 million lights to create a winter wonderland, as well as a fireworks display at midnight. 3. Washington, D.C. ($140) DC has a new year's party for every style and price range. Check out the list of great parties by clicking here. 4. Kissimmee, FL ($145) The Orlando area theme parks are a fabulous experience around the holidays, and several are staying open until midnight to ring in the new year, including Disney World's Epcot and Magic Kingdom. 5. Houston ($146) Houston has tons of family-friendly events to ring in the New Year. Our favorite is the High Noon Countdown at the Woodland Children's Museum on December 31. Celebrate with a dance party and several balloon drops, then get the kids home for bedtime! Check out Priceline's Season of Savings event - 6 weeks of rotating weekly deals on all types of travel. Travelers can save up to $625 on packaged bookings with extra discounts on select hotels in Las Vegas, Orlando, Mexico, and Hawaii including The Venetian Resort (LV), Virgin Hotels Las Vegas, Curio Collection by Hilton (LV), B Resort and Spa (Orlando, an official Walt Disney World Resort), Sheraton Waikiki (HI), Secrets The Vine Cancun Resort & Spa (MX, All-Inclusive and Adults Only), and more. All bookings must be made by Sunday, December 5, with travel to occur throughout 2022 (see website for exact details and terms as travel dates vary by hotel to receive additional savings). Be sure to check out Priceline.com to check out the deal of the week which is unveiled on Monday each week through January 3, 2022.

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    Best spots for fall foliage out west

    New England gets all the credit. It is known for its seasonal changing of the leaves throughout Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont - and you can find a road trip guide to New England here. But this region is not the only part of the U.S. that cast off different shades during autumn. Here is where to see the best fall foliage in the western states. WEST Arizona Outside of Sedona, Red Rock State Park’s riparian zone of Oak Creek Canyon goes by Fremont cottonwood, sycamore, velvet ash and Arizona alder trees on various trails and the path up to the Eagle’s Nest Trail to get a top-down view. See Slide Rock State Park on the same day; trees there also provide a vibrant contrast against the Oak Creek’s red rocks. Idaho The Boise River Greenbelt is a tree-lined pathway throughout the city and connects walkers and cyclists to its various riverside parks. Or head out on the Sawtooth Scenic Byway, as this Highway 75 rolls north past the Harriman Trail and the Galena Summit Overlook, then on through the resort towns of Hailey, Ketchum, and Sun Valley. Great Basin National Park. Photo credit: Sydney Martinez/Travel Nevada Nevada In Eastern Nevada, the Great Basin National Park encourages you to drive around at your own pace. Its Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive is a paved 12-mile route leading to an elevation exceeding 10,000 feet and views of groves of aspen trees in yellow, red and gold. New Mexico The Santa Fe National Forest Scenic Byway leads to a 13,000-foot aspen filled alpine wilderness, where the hillsides from Hyde Memorial State Park to Ski Santa Fe shine vibrantly gold. Fall colors hit nicely along U.S. 64, across the Carson National Forest between Taos and Chama and through Tres Piedras and Tierra Amarilla, where the view of the Brazos Cliffs is worth the stop. Wyoming Along Battle Pass Scenic Byway, a 57-mile Sierra Madre Mountains of the Medicine Bow National Forest, see the famous strand of trees known as Aspen Alley. Jackson is a gateway to two of the country’s most beautiful national parks – Yellowstone and Grand Teton. Drive along the Cloud Peak Skyway Scenic Byway, the southern-most route across the Bighorn National Forest, for views of the Bighorn Mountains that are framed by yellow- and gold-hued aspens.

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    Explore the Great Outdoors of the Pikes Peak Region

    UPDATE 8/4/2020: Colorado Springs says in a press release that they have launched a certification program for local businesses that will comply with COVID protections. You can read more about Colorado Spring's response here: https://www.visitcos.com/coronavirus-colorado-springs/peak-of-safety-pledge/ As our country is on the road to recovery, travel planning has resumed. While the typical summer travel season will look different in the “new norm,” there is still plenty to see and explore while remaining safe.In Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region, many businesses and attractions have started to open their doors once again. Whether you’re ready to pack your suitcase or still in the early stages of planning your trip, our guide will ensure you have a fun-filled itinerary and are prepared with all of the info you need to be “Colo-Ready.” Know Before You Go Colorado is currently in a “Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors” phase of recovery. It means people are still encouraged to social distance but can recreate and get outdoors responsibly. Each county of Colorado has its own requirements and regulations, so make sure you check with individual counties before you arrive. The Pikes Peak region comprises El Paso, Fremont and Teller counties, each of which may have their own regulations. In Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region, we welcome visitors and encourage them all to practice social distancing and respect guidelines of individual businesses. For example, while most municipalities don’t require face masks be worn at all times, we do ask that visitors bring masks with them and wear them 1) If a business requires it 2) If they are indoors where others are congregating and 3) If they are in more crowded outdoor areas. The Pikes Peak region is well positioned for social distancing with plenty of activities to do outdoors, all allowing space from others. If you’re planning to spend time on the beautiful trails and open spaces, make sure to spend a few minutes learning how to Leave No Trace. The Adventure Is You In the Pikes Peak region, you can truly craft your own adventure. From going on a hike to whitewater rafting or sitting on a patio and enjoying a brew – there’s something for everyone. ACTIVITIES & ATTRACTIONS Whether you’re planning a leisurely family weekend or a trip jam-packed with adrenaline-pumping adventure, you can find it in the Pikes Peak region. Check out the recommended attractions and activities below that are now open for business and explore more things to do at VisitCOS.com. Summit Pikes Peak – Nothing says social distancing like heading to the top of one of the state’s 14ers. Hike, bike or drive up Pikes Peak – America’s Mountain. At 14,115 feet, the top of the mountain serves breathtaking views of the region. The current Summit House is now open for business, offering summiteers hot coffee, fudge and its world-famous fresh donuts. Explore Garden of the Gods Park – A National Natural Landmark, Garden of the Gods features towering sandstone rock formations framing majestic Pikes Peak. Rent an e-bike, go rock climbing or hike the many trails in the park. Hit the road on a scenic drive – Colorado Springs is a hop, skip and a jump away from plenty of scenic drives. Get your camera ready, check out jaw-dropping gorges and wind your way through mountain ghost towns. Visit the Royal Gorge region – Just an hour outside of Colorado Springs, the Royal Gorge region is full of activities. The Royal Gorge Bridge & Park offers gondolas, ziplines, the Skycoaster, Via Ferrata and suspension bridge. Afterward, you can book a ticket aboard the Royal Gorge Route Railroad to ride, dine and unwind. Take the family on a Jeep tour – Buckle up and get a taste of Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region in the open air. Adventures Out West will take you on a tour through well-known landmarks like Garden of the Gods, Cheyenne Canyon and Manitou Springs while you learn about Colorado history. Colorado Jeep Tours in Cañon City offers interpretive tours of the Royal Gorge, Red Canyon and historic mining district of Cripple Creek and Victor. Get your zen on with paddle yoga – Sign up for a paddleboard yoga class. Dragonfly Paddle Yoga offers dynamic, flowing yoga sequences on Monument Lake, Quail Lake and Prospect Lake while following safety precautions and social distancing. Ride the rapids or relax while rafting – Experience a one-of-a-kind rafting adventure with Echo Canyon River Expeditions. With safety guidelines in place, you can enjoy an adventure ranging from extreme white water rafting to calm family floats. Challenge yourself on a rock-climbing adventure – Sign up for a guided climb with Front Range Climbing Company at Garden of the Gods Park, Red Rock Canyon Open Space or North Cheyenne Cañon. Learn basic rock-climbing skills or tackle a more expert route. Hike to your heart’s desire – There is no shortage of hiking in the region. Check out the Trails and Open Space Coalition for recommendations of less-crowded trails. From beginner trails to trails that take you all the way up Pikes Peak, there are plenty of options for all explorers. Find additional hiking trails here. LODGING Colorado Springs offers a variety of lodging options from luxury hotels to camping, glamping, cabins and more. Luxury hotel stays Cheyenne Mountain, A Dolce Resort – Experience a luxury, lakeside stay with mountain views, fine dining and spa services. Garden of the Gods Resort and Club – Relax and focus on your wellness at a world-class resort with views overlooking Garden of the Gods Park. Glen Eyrie Castle – Stay the night in a castle situated in the rolling foothills. It’s rich, spiritual history and modern comfort will provide you with a safe haven during your stay. Alternative stays Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort – If you’re planning a trip full of biking and activity, the Bicycle Resort is your base camp for adventure. Located on a designated bike route connecting Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs, it’s in close proximity to countless miles of biking trails at the base of Pikes Peak and less than a mile from Garden of the Gods Park. SCP Hotel – Known for its holistic hospitality, SCP stands for “Soul, Community, Planet.” Its hand-crafted venues feature reclaimed wood, living green walls, exposed brick and hand-painted murals, which unite earth-friendly and socially responsible practices. It’s the perfect place to stay for those who value personal wellness, social good and the environment. Timber Lodge Cabins – If you’re looking for a truly Colorado environment, the Timber Lodge is a great option. The charming A-frame cabins are located on the far west side of Colorado Springs, on the border of historic Manitou Springs and only a mile from Old Colorado City. It’s walking distance from the hiking trails of Garden of the Gods Park and Red Rock Open Space. FOOD & DRINK The Pikes Peak region is known for its vast array of food and drink options. Dive into Instagrammable plates and local brews. Bars/breweries The Bench – Enjoy burgers, brews and sports at this charming downtown sports bar. Colorado Mountain Brewery – From starters like fried pickles and brewery pretzels to burgers, pizzas and wraps, you’ll have plenty to choose from. Wash it down with one of the brewery’s flagship beers. Phantom Canyon Brewery – Named after the majestic Phantom Canyon, the brewery offers flagship beers and guest beers along with a full dining menu. The rooftop showcases sweeping views of the city and Rocky Mountains. Home-style restaurants Coquette’s Bistro – Coquette’s is a 100% gluten-free restaurant serving up food, baked goods and cocktails. Located in a cozy corner of downtown Colorado Springs, the spot is convenient for enjoying the city’s atmosphere. Mason Jar – Dive into traditional American specialties like the legendary Chicken Fried Steak and comfort food that never goes out of style. Elevated dining Joseph’s Fine Dining – With 25 years working in many five-star hotels and restaurants, Joseph Freyre’s concept mixes the world of old table side flambé cooking with nouveau cuisine. Experience dishes from escargots to sea scallops and lamb leg steak. The Warehouse – Chef James Africano prepares dishes using only the freshest ingredients and local, in-season products. Try unique plates like pan-seared lamb liver and rabbit carbonara. Cultural cuisine Edelweiss – This authentic German restaurant serves up everything from weinerschnitzels and jagerschnitzels to bratwurst, strudels and sauerbraten. La Casa Fiesta – This family-owned Mexican restaurant is a Monument staple. Enjoy traditional Mexican food with a New Mexican flare. Whether you’re from Colorado or traveling from afar, Colorado Springs and the Pikes Peak region is an area ripe for exploration. With so many options for exploring outdoors, it’s the perfect trip to start planning now. Get “Colo-Ready” and pack your bags! Budget Travel is working with tourism boards around the USA to highlight destinations that are ready for tourists and can provide safe, socially distant activity.

    Budget Travel Lists

    Top 7 travel destinations that have had a serious glow-up

    For many Americans, repurposing marvelous old buildings is always better than tearing them down. And while the term “urban renewal” comes with a little baggage, it’s hard to argue with its particular way of salvaging and adapting neglected older spaces for our modern world. City planners and architects across the country have found spectacular ways to reimagine vintage structures. You’ve seen it at New York City’s High Line, which converted a dilapidated Manhattan railroad into a lovely 1.5-mile “linear park.” And this year in Chicago, the gigantic, abandoned Old Post Office will open its repurposed 2.8 million square feet as a 21st-century office complex featuring a food hall, rooftop park, and restored Art Deco design. So for those travelers who appreciate the splendors of historic preservation and civic innovation, this shortlist of revitalized urban destinations is for you. 1. BeltLine, Atlanta One of the great Southern cities has circled back to its roots with adaptive-reuse projects across town – most notably along the BeltLine, itself a remarkable project. In 2005, Atlanta opened the first BeltLine section, a retired railway corridor–turned–multi-use trail that’s today lined with public art and parks. It drew more residents and businesses to the east side, and sparked the transformation of a massive old Sears distribution complex into Ponce City Market, now a dazzling mixed-use retail, dining, commercial, and residential center. Other industrial spaces along the trail have found new life too, like Inman Park’s Krog Street Market. More are sure to follow as new BeltLine sections open up in coming years, eventually spanning 33 miles. 2. Crescent Park, New Orleans Waterfronts across the country have been rediscovered in recent decades, thanks to city planners realizing the potential to replace retired wharves with versatile public space. In New Orleans, such creative thinking led to Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile linear park just east of the French Market. What once was a bustling industrial riverfront has since 2014 been a busy 20-acre green space with picnic areas, a dog run, and seasonal events and festivals. The Crescent City is seeing adaptive reuse elsewhere too, as seen across the Warehouse Arts District, at spots like the Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery, a modern hotel that prizes the building’s 19th-century heritage. In the Central Business District, Pythian Market is a locally curated food hall inside a restored 1908 tower with a fascinating tie to the city’s early civil-rights movement. 3. Discovery Green, Houston From parking lot to 12-acre park – that’s the story of Houston’s downtown Discovery Green. With the support of local philanthropy foundations, in 2002 the city seized the opportunity to convert concrete lots into an urban park with playgrounds, music stages, trails, gardens, bocce courts, restaurants, and other public amenities. The LEED-certified park now draws more than 1.2 million annual visitors, and has inspired revitalization projects across Midtown and East Downtown neighborhoods. 4. The Wharf, Washington, DC Washington’s Southwest neighborhood had for decades been a neglected corner of town, due partly to accessibility challenges caused by highways dividing it from major attractions. But that changed in 2017, when a $2 billion development transformed the industrial waterfront into the mixed-use District Wharf. The 10-acre neighborhood is now more easily accessible from the Metro (with a short walk or free shuttle), by car or cab, or by water taxi or private boat. These days, visitors from around the region flock to the Wharf that’s home to both restored historic structures and new “green” architecture – forming a year-round recreation, entertainment, and dining destination on the Washington Channel. 5. Crosstown Concourse, Memphis Old warehouses remain prized property for urban developers looking to adapt rather than build anew. Just head to the Crosstown Concourse in Memphis, where a humongous Sears store and distribution center, abandoned in 1983, became a thriving “vertical urban village” in 2017. The art deco complex that once served millions of mail-order customers now accommodates shoppers, diners, residents, and workers across its 1.2 million sq ft. It’s even home to a charter high school, medical clinics, a YMCA, and a contemporary arts organization with galleries and performance space. (Memphis is one of several US cities that have reused retired Sears complexes. You’ll find similar projects in Minneapolis, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Boston.) 6. Downtown Project, Las Vegas Not so much a single project as an evolving investment, Las Vegas’s Downtown Project is the city’s ongoing urban-revitalization initiative in its historic Fremont East/East Village districts. Driven (and financed) by Zappos founder Tony Hsieh, who parked the company headquarters there in 2013, the Downtown Project has poured $350 million into the neighborhood’s 61 acres. Today, Vegas visitors, workers, and residents enjoy new (and newly supported) businesses along the established street grid – from restaurants and bars, to arts spaces and boutiques, all complemented by award-winning urban design and public art. Befitting a project led by an online retail giant, the project’s Container Park houses nearly 40 businesses in repurposed shipping containers. 7. The Steel Yard, Providence The industrial character of Providence’s Valley neighborhood turned out to be a perfect setting for a vibrant urban arts studio. In 2002, the Steel Yard took over the century-old Providence Steel and Iron building just a year after it shuttered. Since then, all 12,000 sq ft have served as nonprofit workspaces for ceramics, woodwork, welding, blacksmith, and jewelry creators on the banks of the Woonasquatucket River. The Steel Yard reopened a refreshed space last year, and along the way it’s inspired other proprietors to make use of Valley’s lofty, leftover brick complexes, including the “elevated street casual” eatery Troop. Look for more action in this area over coming years, as city planners develop a linear park called Woonasquatucket River Corridor linking Downtown Providence to Valley in the coming years.

    Budget Travel Lists

    7 Great Things to Eat in Portland, Oregon

    From five-star dining to hole-in-the-wall dives, Portland’s food scene has something for everyone. There’s so much tempting stuff on offer that during any given visit, there are far more places I want to try than meals I have time to eat. And the best part? The odd splurge notwithstanding, you don’t have to break the bank to have a good experience. Here are seven delicious, budget-friendly bites from my last trip—each one $15 or less. 1. Rose VL Deli (Maya Stanton) In a small strip of storefronts in the Foster-Powell neighborhood, this spin-off of the well-regarded Ha VL restaurant serves some highly rated bowls of Vietnamese soup. Different types are on offer each day, and I was lucky enough to stop by on a Tuesday, when the VL special noodle soup, called Hu Tieu VL, is up for grabs. For $11, you more than get your money’s worth: a huge helping of clear, piquant broth swimming with shrimp, fish balls, ground pork, pork liver, sliced BBQ pork, and quail eggs, topped with crispy garlic and crunchy scallions and cilantro stems and anchored with a hefty portion of rice noodles. With a dish of the usual accoutrements (bean sprouts, scallions, herbs, and a wedge of lime) on the side, it's a satisfyingly substantial yet not-too-heavy meal. 6424 SE Powell Boulevard, 503.206.4344; rosevl.com. 2. Jacqueline (Maya Stanton) For a high-meets-low experience, sustainable seafood restaurant Jacqueline offers dollar oysters and Rainier tallboys during happy hour, Monday through Saturday from 5:00-7:00 p.m. It’s shuckers’ choice, so you won’t get to pick what you want, but rest assured you’ll be satisfied with the selection. The day I visited, the Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou-inspired neighborhood spot was only serving west coast varieties (alongside its usual array of house-made sauces—everything from a classic mignonette to tarragon to tabasco), and each one was icy cold and perfectly pristine. Not content to leave well enough alone, I followed the platter of bivalves with an elegant yellowtail crudo ($15), which paired the fatty fish with creamy avocado, tart grapefruit and ponzu, and a handful of bright-green sprouted coriander, to delicious effect. 2039 SE Clinton Street, 503.327.8637; jacquelinepdx.com. 3. Taqueria Santa Cruz (Maya Stanton) On my last day in Portland, the weather was unseasonably sunny and warm, so I hopped on a bus (well, two buses) and took the hour-long ride out to Cathedral Park, on the banks of the Willamette River in the shadow of St. Johns bridge. After a pitstop for a pint at Occidental Brewing Co. (occidentalbrewing.com), I took a lap around the park, watched some happy pups playing in the water, paused for a selfie under the Instagram-bait bridge, and then wandered back up to the main drag in search of a snack. My friend had recommended a taqueria in the back of a Mexican grocery store, and that’s how I found myself in a bigger-than-expected neon-lit room, watching Dirty Dancing on the corner TV as I waited for my order: a trio of meat-filled tacos. The carne asada was fine, nothing special, but the crispy-edged, well-spiced al pastor was great, and the tender chunks of lengua, draped with a generous helping of pickled onions from the complimentary salsa bar, were even better. And the fact that each one rang in at less than $2 a pop didn't hurt either. 8630 N. Lombard St., 503.286.7302; tiendasantacruz.com. 4. Cheese & Crack (Maya Stanton) A small, 20-seat spot with a low wood counter facing floor-to-ceiling windows, Cheese & Crack offers an array of well-composed cheese plates featuring homemade butter crackers and savory oatmeal cookies, baguette slices, olives, and cornichons, plus spoons full of mustard, honey, and chocolate ganache for good measure. My friend and I split the combo with Mycella bleu and Cypress Grove fromage blanc ($12) as well as a sandwich (pork-shoulder capicola with apple butter and greens; $8) and a salad (mixed greens with pickled cranberries, lentils, and shallots; $4); with a glass of frosé on the side, it made for an excellent sunny-afternoon spread. 22 SE 28th Avenue, 503.206.7315; cheeseandcrack.com. 5. Little Bird (Carly Diaz) Portland’s happy hour scene is unparalleled, especially for a taste of high-priced dining at a discount. On weekdays from 2:30-5:00 p.m. at Little Bird, part of two-time James Beard award-winner Gabriel Rucker’s local mini-empire, choose from half-priced oysters, roasted marrow bones, foie gras torchon, and a double-patty burger with brie ($7), a rich, messy, thoroughly satisfying affair that’s well worth the extra napkins. We'd come specifically for the burger and ordered marinated olives, brussels sprouts, and fries with bearnaise aioli to go with it, splitting the whole lot three ways, which felt almost virtuous and turned out to be just the right amount of food. (I'll admit, though: I could've done with a bit more of that burger.) 215 SW 6th Avenue, 503.688.5952; littlebirdbistro.com. 6. Tusk (A.J. Meeker) Since its opening in August 2016, Middle Eastern hotspot Tusk has earned rave reviews from local and national media outlets alike, and now, nearly two years on, its brunch still commands lengthy waits. But we managed to snag bar seats on a Sunday morning without too much trouble, and it’s a good thing we braved the crowds. The main plates were stellar, from a Cypriot spin on the classic egg-and-meat breakfast combination (think: halloumi cheese and merguez sausage) to baked eggs, greens, and more halloumi in a spicy tomato sauce, and I especially loved the “Bread & Things” side of the menu. We got the kobocha cinnamon roll, a slice of pistachio gooey butter cake (above; $5), and a za’atar biscuit served with hibiscus honey butter, but next time, I’m ordering everything in that category, and another bloody Mary with preserved lemon too. 2448 E Burnside Street, 503.894.8082; tuskpdx.com. 7. Bang Bang (Katana Triplett) For Southeast Asian-inspired fare at a reasonable price, look no further than Bang Bang, a small, mod spot on NE Fremont slinging high-wattage cocktails and the drinking snacks that go along with them. We opted for the glass-noodle bowl ($14), a tangle of the namesake translucent strands topped with piles of spicy ground pork, tangy pickled greens, mixed herbs, and garlic chips, plus a soft, runny-yolked egg and a healthy dash of chili. My advice? Poke the egg and let the yolk mingle with the other elements, then toss everything together and dig in; wash it all down with a white negroni or an old-fashioned, and thank me later. 4727 NE Fremont, (503) 287-3846; bangbangpdx.com.

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    Hotel We Love: Golden Gate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas

    Las Vegas has a Burlesque Hall of Fame, the Mob Museum, the Neon Museum (more on that in a minute), and all kinds of other institutions that focus on aspects of Sin City's heritage. There is, however, no official establishment that puts the city’s history on display. For that you can turn to the Golden Gate Hotel and Casino.  THE STORY The hotel, located off The Strip, has all the glitz and bravado of the familiar Las Vegas resort, but what makes it notable is not an elaborate theme park-like vibe or lavish fixings. Yes, it’s a tremendous property with 122 rooms and a sprawling 24-hour casino (as if you need reminding that a Vegas casino is 24-hours), but its main attraction is in the fine details. You don’t have to look too hard to see that property is a veritable time capsule and if you know where to look and who to ask, you can pick up nuggets of local history that are as captivating as watching the resident card shark clean up at the blackjack table. The hotel was built in 1906, and one of the regular visitors was none other than Dean Martin. He had a fear of flying, so he always came to down on the bus. Today you can still spot the Greyhound station across the street from the main entrance.  A display cases in the hotel lobby exhibit original betting ledgers and antique telephones, the latter in honor of the Golden Gate having the first working phone in the city. The phone number? “1.” In what we can only assume is a nod to its telecommunications claim to fame, the last four digits of the hotel’s main phone number today is 1906, the year is opened. HISTORIC BUILDING, MODERN QUARTERS When the Golden Gate first opened at the turn of the 20th century, there were 106 guest rooms. Then in 2012, having endured countless design styles and American movements, the hotel built an entirely new five-story tower. It’s connected to the original structure seamlessly in terms of design, but its forward-looking design and engineering elements are astounding. For instance, it was the first cement hotel in the country. And elevator in the addition runs on energy generated by the elevator itself on each trip downwards. It's the first of its kind in the state and 16th in the world. Additionally, the water in the rooms are heated by geothermal wells. The original rooms have all been renovated and outfitted with thoroughly modern amenities, motion-sensor climate control, like flat-screen TVs and iHome clock radios.    Rooms range from a standard set-up to luxury suites to two posh penthouses and they feature design touches that pay tribute to various styles that defined the 20th century. Art Deco accoutrements, for one, range from lamps to the pinstripe-inspired carpet patterns. And speaking of carpets, don’t miss the floor coverings in the casino. New carpeting, laid down in 2012, has a design reminiscent of Art Deco patterns.  THE NEIGHBORHOOD Any hotel on The Strip boasts The Strip as a main attraction. The Golden Gate is located in what’s considered Vegas’s Downtown, which is less than five miles from the Bellagio and the rest. But while you don’t get fountains that put on a Broadway-caliber show or buildings that make you feel like you’re at a World’s Fair, you don’t have to trade off any of the raucous, late-into-the-night revelry. One of the hotel’s entrances opens right out onto the Fremont Street Experience, a lively four-block-long pavilion-like street that features a 10-story tall video screen that shows jaw-dropping light shows at the top of every hour from 6pm to 1am.   The property is less than a mile stroll to the fantasy-tinged Neon Museum, an engaging institution that features, among other things, a “boneyard” of gargantuan signs of light bulbs, neon tubing, a study of the intersection of kitsch and class. They tell the story of iconic restaurants and hotels that have risen and fallen since Vegas became a destination for its flash and glamour and American soul. There’s The Golden Nugget sign from 1961, with neon reaching up to three stories in height. There’s the Moulin Rouge’s sign from 1955, marking the first integrated casino. Treasure Island Casino’s hulking pirate skull. When taken as a whole, the relics chronicle the joys and fears of a nation. You’ll learn, for instance, that when the Russians launched Sputnik in 1958, all things pointed to atomic testing, both in the news and in culture. Thus, all kinds of imagery of atomic-themed beauty contests and the 19-story sign for the luxurious, mobster-run Stardust, its name spelled out in jagged-edged letters like an animated explosion. The hotel was imploded in 2007. RATES & DEETS Starting at $55. Golden Gate Hotel & Casino1 Freemont StreetLas Vegas, NV 89101 (702)385-1906 / goldengatecasino.com 

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    DESTINATION IN Nebraska

    Omaha

    Omaha ( OH-mə-hah) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Nebraska and the county seat of Douglas County. Omaha is in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (15 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River (also known as the Nebraska River). The nation's 39th-largest city, Omaha's 2020 census population was 486,051. It is the second-largest city in the Great Plains states (behind Oklahoma City), the second-largest city along the Missouri River (behind Kansas City, Missouri), and the seventh-largest city in the Midwest. Omaha is the anchor of the eight-county, bi-state Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area. The Omaha Metropolitan Area is the 58th-largest in the United States, with a population of 967,604. The Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, NE-IA Combined Statistical Area (CSA) encompasses the Omaha-Council Bluffs MSA as well as the separate Fremont, NE Micropolitan Statistical Area, which consists of the entirety of Dodge County, Nebraska. The total population of the CSA was 970,023 based on 2017 estimates. Approximately 1.3 million people reside within the Greater Omaha area, within a 50 mi (80 km) radius of Downtown Omaha. Omaha's pioneer period began in 1854, when the city was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs, Iowa. The city was founded along the Missouri River, and a crossing called Lone Tree Ferry earned the city its nickname, the "Gateway to the West". Omaha introduced this new West to the world in 1898, when it played host to the World's Fair, dubbed the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. During the 19th century, Omaha's central location in the United States spurred the city to become an important national transportation hub. Throughout the rest of the 19th century, the transportation and jobbing sectors were important in the city, along with its railroads and breweries. In the 20th century, the Omaha Stockyards, once the world's largest, and its meatpacking plants gained international prominence. Today, Omaha is the home to the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies: mega-conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's largest construction companies, Kiewit Corporation; insurance and financial firm Mutual of Omaha; and the United States' largest railroad operator, Union Pacific Corporation. Berkshire Hathaway is headed by local investor Warren Buffett, one of the wealthiest people in the world, according to a decade's worth of Forbes rankings, some of which have ranked him as high as No. 1.Omaha is also the home to five Fortune 1000 headquarters: Green Plains Renewable Energy, TD Ameritrade, Valmont Industries, Werner Enterprises, and West Corporation. Also headquartered in Omaha are the following: First National Bank of Omaha, the largest privately held bank in the United States; three of the nation's ten largest architecture/engineering firms (DLR Group, HDR, Inc., and Leo A Daly); and the Gallup Organization, of Gallup Poll fame, and its riverfront Gallup University. Notable modern Omaha inventions include the following: the "pink hair curler" created at Omaha's Tip Top Products; Butter Brickle Ice Cream, and the Reuben sandwich, conceived by a chef at the then–Blackstone Hotel on 36th and Farnam Streets; cake mix, developed by Duncan Hines, then a division of Omaha's Nebraska Consolidated Mills, the forerunner to today's ConAgra Foods; center-pivot irrigation by the Omaha company now known as Valmont Corporation; Raisin Bran, developed by Omaha's Skinner Macaroni Co.; the first ski lift in the U.S., in 1936, by Omaha's Union Pacific Corp.; the Top 40 radio format, pioneered by Todd Storz, scion of Omaha's Storz Brewing Co. and head of Storz Broadcasting, and first used in the U.S. at Omaha's KOWH Radio; and the TV dinner, developed by Omaha's Carl A. Swanson.