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    Atlantic City,

    New Jersey

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    Save up to 50% on Hotels

    Atlantic City, often known by its initials A.C., is a coastal resort city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States, known for its casinos, boardwalk, and beaches. In 2020, the city had a population of 37,743. It was incorporated on May 1, 1854, from portions of Egg Harbor Township and Galloway Township. It is located on Absecon Island and borders Absecon, Brigantine, Pleasantville, Ventnor City, Egg Harbor Township, and the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic City inspired the U.S. version of the board game Monopoly, especially the street names. Since 1921, Atlantic City has been the home of the Miss America pageant. In 1976, New Jersey voters legalized casino gambling in Atlantic City, and the first casino opened in 1978.
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    DealsInspirationRediscover America

    Black Friday's best travel deals from around the web

    Whether you’re planning a staycation closer to home or an epic adventure in Mexico or the Caribbean, these Black Friday and Cyber Monday travel deals will help you do it for less, with rates starting under $250 per night and most travel dates extending into or through 2022. Note that blackout dates apply, most properties have flexible cancellation policies and some links won’t be active until November 26, 2021. Click here to join Budget Travel's free membership program for access to incredible deals year-round. Vacation Packages, Guided Tours and Cruises Apple Vacations & FunJet: Book November 24–December 4 to save up to $175 on mainland U.S. vacation packages and up to $500 on trips to Hawaii, Europe, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Beach Bound: Book your beach break November 26–30 to save up to $175 on trips to Florida and $500 on trips to Hawaii. Deals to Mexico and the Caribbean are also available, with $250 off stays of five or more nights with promo code BB250 and $500 off stays of seven or more nights with promo code BB500. Cheap Caribbean: This year’s specials include all-inclusive resorts from $49 per person per night, $250 off stays of five or more nights (with promo code CYBER250) and $500 off stays of seven or more nights (with promo code CYBER500) when you book November 25–30. G Adventures: Now through December 3, you can save up to 30% on over 500 guided tours around the world operating through March 31, 2022, and up to 20% on select tours through October 31, 2022, as part of G Adventures’ Cyber Sale. Go City: A great staycation option, you’ll get 15% off Go City passes in San Diego, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, New York City, Miami, Orlando, Hawaii (Oahu), as well as Cancun and London, by purchasing them November 23–30. Passes are valid for up to two years so you can always wait until you’re ready to travel again before activating them. City Cruises: Celebrate the season with 20% discounts on dining cruises in various cities around the U.S., Canada and the U.K. when you use promo code CYBER20 to book November 23-29 and set sail in December 2021. Priceline: Its biggest sale EVER. Sales unlock throughout the day for deep discounts on hotels, rental cars, flights, cruises, and more. Email rewards members can be on the lookout for a mystery coupon offering up to 99% off on hotel bookings. Virgin Voyages: Those ready to get back into cruising can save 20% and score a $100 bonus bar tab (when purchasing a $300 bar tab) as part of Virgin Voyages’ sale. Book November 15–29 to save on Scarlet Lady sailings from December 1, 2021, to March 27, 2022, and Valiant Lady sailings from March 18, 2022, to May 22, 2022. Hotels in the U.S. Hyatt: You can save up to 15% at over 850 participating Hyatt hotels and resorts by booking now through December 21 and staying by April 30, 2022. Arlo Hotels: Book November 26–29 to save 40% on rates at Arlo Hotels’ Miami and New York City properties when you stay now through April 30, 2022. Caesars: Caesars’ Atlantic City and Las Vegas hotels are offering 25% off stays booked November 22–28 with promo code CYBER21 and 30% off rates booked on November 29 with promo code CYBERM and November 30 with promo code CYBERT. All stays must be completed by October 31, 2022. Lark Hotels and Bluebird by Lark: Save 25% at Lark’s properties in the Northeastern U.S. and California when you use promo code CYBER2021, book November 26–29 and stay by May 12, 2022. Westgate Resorts: Use promo code FRIDAY to save up to 50% off at one of Westgate Resorts’ 27 U.S. properties when you book November 26–30. Florida Thesis Hotel Miami: Save 40% on rates at this chic Coral Gables hotel when you book November 22–29 and stay November 22 through September 5, 2022. Shelborne South Beach: Book between Black Friday and Cyber Monday to receive discounts of up to 60% on stays through 2022. The Balflour Hotel: Reserve four or more nights now through November 30 to save 25% on stays through April 30, 2022. You’ll also receive a nifty $50 food and beverage credit to use while you’re there. Plunge Beach Resort: In Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Plunge Beach Resort is offering 50% off weekday bookings made November 23–30. Use promo code Sale50 and stay for at least three nights by December 22, 2022. Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort: This popular panhandle resort is offering discounts of up to 40% when you book November 29–December 2 and travel by March 11, 2022. Tennessee Hu. Hotel: Use promo code CYBER to save 25% on rates at this newly redesigned Memphis property when you book November 26 to December 3 and travel from December 5, 2021, to February 24, 2022. Bode: With two properties in Nashville and Chattanooga to choose from, Bode is offering discounts of 25% on its apartment-style rooms when you book a stay of at least two nights between Black Friday and Cyber Monday and stay November 26, 2021, to February 28, 2022. Virginia The Alexandrian and Morrison House: Just a 20-minute drive from Washington, D.C. in Old Town Alexandria, these two luxury hotels are offering 20% off stays December 1, 2021, to March 31, 2022, when you book November 23–29. Colonial Williamsburg Resorts: Save 50% when you book November 23–29 and stay at least two nights between December 12, 2021, and March 31, 2022. Blue Ridge Parkway in Fall. Credit: Pgiam, Getty Images Rhode Island Hammett’s Hotel: Save up to 65% on your next trip to Newport, with weekday rates from $85 per night and weekend rates from $125 per night. Book November 26–30 and stay now through March 31, 2022, to take advantage of this offer. Pennsylvania $109 Poconos Ski Season Retreat: Includes Breakfast for two. Fully Refundable - Waking up to charming views of snowdrifts over Lake Wallenpaupack at Silver Birches in Hawley, PA, before days spent hiking, snowshoeing and cross country skiing through the Poconos. Philadelphia 4-star resort in city center: Flexible Deal - Hyatt Centric (Center City Philadelphia, PA) was so popular it sold out in under a week. In case you missed it last time, now's your chance to nab an upgraded room with killer views of Center City for just $149 per night through March. Massachusetts Those looking for a Berkshires getaway can save at the following properties when you book at least two nights November 26–30 and stay by May 26, 2022. Red Lion Inn: Save 65% at the Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge, where prices start at $100 per night during the week and $150 per night on weekends. Briarcliff Motel: In Great Barrington, rates start at $50 per night during the week and $110 on weekends. The Seven Hills Inn: This Lenox property has weekday rates from $79 per night and weekend rates from $99 per night, reflecting a savings of 45%. Porches Inn: Save 45% on rates at this popular North Adams property, which has weekday prices from $100 per night and weekend prices from $200 per night. New Jersey Wave Resort: In Long Branch, Wave Resort is offering 40% off rooms booked as part of its Black Friday / Cyber Monday deal, valid on stays now through April 2022 when you book by November 29. The Asbury: Celebrate Black Friday at The Asbury with 35% off rates (use promo code JUSTBOOKTHEROOM) and Cyber Monday with 40% off stays of at least three nights (use promo code YOUDESERVEIT) when you stay by April 30, 2022. Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa: Save 20% on rooms and 10% on suites at this fabulous Atlantic City resort when you book with promo code CYBER12 by December 2 and stay by April 30, 2022. Ocean Casino Resort: Save with king rooms from $59 per night and double rooms from $69 per night (each with a $20 food and beverage credit on Monday–Thursday stays November 28, 2021, to February 17, 2022) studio suites from $139 and one-bedroom suites from $239 on Sunday–Thursday stays within the same timeframe. Discounts to onsite shows and nightlife (valid November 22–29), and beauty services at the salon (valid November 22–December 6) are also available. Illinois Viceroy Chicago: Not only will you save 35% on bookings made now through December 6, you’ll also snag 30% discounts on dining when you use promo code CYBER2021 and stay by December 30, 2022. Sofitel Chicago, Swissotel Chicago and Fairmont Chicago: Three Accor hotels are offering 30% off stays November 22, 2021, to March 31, 2022, when you book November 22–29. Members of Accor’s loyalty program can also save an extra 10%. Gale Chicago: Save 60% during this Black Friday / Cyber Monday sale, with rates from $99 per night when you book November 26–29. Texas Hotel Granduca Austin: Save 20% on rates by booking November 29–December 3 and staying by May 31, 2022. As part of the deal, you’ll receive a $50 food and beverage credit and a $10 donation will be made to the Central Texas Food Bank when you use promo code CYBER21. Arizona Lodge on the Desert: In Tucson, guests who book November 26–29 with promo code BFCM21 and stay between January 1 and April 30, 2022, will receive 50% off rates and enjoy complimentary margaritas, chips and salsa. Hacienda Del Sol Guest Ranch Resort: This popular Tucson resort is offering 40% off rates on select dates from December 2021 through August 2022 when you book November 26–29 online or by calling (520) 299-1501.. Lower Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend tour from $299: Fully refundable with 24 hours before experience cancellation. Explore this beautiful iconic canyon with the people of your choice.. Experience the West Rim of the Grand Canyon from $95: Free cancelation up to 24 hours in advance. This flexible West Rim coach tour offers optional activities to enhance your experience. California $249 Posh Sonoma Wine Country Resort. Fully Refundable - Retreat to Sonoma (Santa Rosa, CA) and stay on 92 acres of vineyards at the always popular Vintners Resort. The deal highlights the best of the resort and features everything you'd need for a relaxing, romantic wine country getaway — a plush room, farm-to-table dining, plus complimentary wine tasting for two people. The Meritage Resort & Spa and Vista Collina Resort: Both Napa Valley resorts are offering 30% discounts and $30 resort credits when you book November 24–30 and visit by March 31, 2022. As part of the deal, a $10 donation will also be made to The First Responders Children’s Foundation. Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa: This deal saves you 21% on rates, throws in a $21 daily food and beverage credit and donates $21 to Just In Time, an organization supporting foster youth, when you book by December 1 and stay by April 30, 2022. Newport Beach 4-star Hyatt stay from $159: Fully Refundable - Whether you're looking for a restful retreat or an action-packed adventure, The Hyatt Regency Newport Beach, CA has you covered. Hop on a beach cruiser and ride along the coast, soak up the SoCal sunshine by the pool or head to the nearby amusement parks through the end of the year. Hotels in the Caribbean and Mexico $569 Cabo beach resort for 3 nights w/ perks: Fully Refundable - Villa La Estancia – Cabo San Lucas, Mexico - This 4-star hotel sits on Medano Beach, one of the best beaches for swimming in Cabo, and it's only a five-minute drive from the happenings of the buzzing downtown area. St. Maarten All-inclusive beach vacation for 2: Kick back and relax on 10 acres of beachfront in the heart of Maho Village at Sonesta Maho Beach Resort & Casino St. Maarten, which is filled with shops, restaurants, and entertainment lounges. This deal covers 4-star digs, plus all your meals and drinks, for just over $100 per person, per night over peak winter season dates. All-inclusive Puerto Vallarta resort 3-night stay for 2 from $899: This luxe all-inclusive Hilton Vallarta Riviera in the heart of Puerto Vallarta Mexico first opened its doors in August. Be among the first to stay while nabbing a room with a private balcony overlooking the Pacific, with this deal for travel through 2022. Atlantis Paradise Island: In Nassau, Bahamas, Atlantis Paradise Island is offering 20% discounts when you book at least five nights November 25–29 and stay between November 28, 2021, and November 30, 2022. You’ll also receive two free Covid-19 antigen tests (for travel back to the U.S.) and a $50 daily resort credit — or a $100 daily resort credit if you sign up for early access November 22–24. Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan: This fabulous Grand Bahama resort is offering rates from $93 per person per night on bookings made November 23–30 for travel November 25, 2021–January 31, 2022. Rates include all taxes, fees, daily continental breakfast and unlimited greens fees at the onsite golf course. ​​Curaçao: ​​Celebrate Black Friday and Cyber Monday with deals at 13 hot hotels, including 45% off at Acoya Curaçao Resort, Villas & Spa; 20% off at Papagayo Beach Hotel and Papagayo Beach Resort; up to 50% off at Sunscape Curaçao Resort, Spa & Casino and Dreams Curaçao Resort, Spa & Casino; and perks like complimentary tours and breakfast, among other deals and discounts. Saint Lucia: Choose from more than 30 travel deals among Saint Lucia’s many hotels, resorts, tours and attractions, all part of the island’s Cyber Monday sale. Sonesta Maho Beach Resort, Casino & Spa: In St. Maarten, save 50% on stays of at least three nights at this all-inclusive resort when you use promo code BFSALE. Book now through November 28 and visit by December 23, 2022. Karisma Hotels & Resorts: Save 60% at Karisma’s all-inclusive hotels and resorts throughout the Caribbean and Mexico, including Azul Beach Resorts, El Dorado Spa Resorts, Margaritaville Island Reserve brands and Nickelodeon Hotels & Resorts when you book now through December 6 and stay by December 23, 2022. Iberostar Grand Bávaro, Coral Level at Iberostar Selection Cancún and Iberostar Grand Rose Hall: These fabulous five-star all-inclusive resorts — located in the Dominican Republic, Mexico and Jamaica, respectively — are each offering 60% off stays booked November 19–30. Las Brisas Hotel Collection: Score 40% discounts as well as 20% off food, drinks and spa treatments at Las Brisas properties in Mexico when you book November 22–29 and stay November 22, 2021–December 21, 2022. Call 1-866-221-2961 or email info@brisas.com.mx to book. Meliá Hotels International: This popular brand is offering two sales, each letting you save up to 50% at its U.S., Mexico and Caribbean properties. Now through November 28, use this link to book the Black Friday sale, then check this link for the Cyber Monday sale, available to book November 29–30.

    Inspiration

    Spend some time on the sand watching these beach web cams

    With beachside vacations being put on hold with coronavirus-related closures, there’s an alternative way to access sand and surf – right from your screen. Across United States, the nation’s beaches are being represented on screen from coast to coast. Embrace these picturesque views across the United States through these web cams. In California, view Doran Beach in Bodega Bay’s Doran National Park in Sonoma County beach. Torrance Beach’s webcam captures this 1.5 mile stretch of sand. Meanwhile in Monterey County, the Tickle Pink Inn in Carmel keeps a camera’s eye on the Big Sur Coastline. In San Diego, the landmark Hotel del Coronado shows off its sandy scene online. On Visit California’s website, take a 360 degree VR experience along California’s North Coast Beaches; catch more of the Golden State’s beaches through LiveBeaches.com. Wisconsin’s Madeline Island, the largest of the state’s Apostle Islands, is home to the two-mile Big Bay Beach along with Big Bay State Park. In South Carolina, see different parts of Myrtle Beach through this EarthCam plus Edisto Beach on Edisto Island can be seen through video too. In Virginia Beach, view various filming angles of this coastal city, including its boardwalk, along with the waterside community of Sandbridge. The Wildwoods, NJ lights up with nine cameras throughout this five-mile island capturing its boardwalks and beaches. Also, find different feeds of the Jersey Shore beaches, from Asbury Park to Atlantic City and Cape May. Other Jersey beaches range from Jenkinson’s Point Pleasant Beach to Bay Head. Long Island, New York has live cameras on locations, including Long Beach, with its 2.2-mile boardwalk; Main Beach in East Hampton; Coopers Beach in Southampton; and Fire Island. Florida has their beaches covered and can be seen through the Visit Florida website. However, their respective regions are also showing their sand off. Paradise Coast is experiencing cameras across Naples and Marco Island, while The Palm Beaches have their eight beach cams collectively on one website; Florida Keys and Key West have a wide variety of water and beach view web cams. Also in Florida, South Walton is streaming Alys Beach and Grayton Beach and Grayton Dunes in Grayton Beach State Park. Pensacola Beach can be screened with east, west and south views. St. Pete/Clearwater through four live beach webcams of Clearwater Beach, Indian Rocks Beach and two different views of St. Pete Beach. Or check out Miami's sand scene with these beach cams.

    Inspiration

    The Best Resorts on the Jersey Shore for a Fall Trip

    The kids are back at school, family holidays have come and gone, but the northeast isn’t giving up its summer glory just yet. And with a handful of hip, new and lovingly renovated hotels gracing the New Jersey shoreline this year, it’s not hard to find a fall getaway that suits your mood. Though the lifeguards have abandoned their chairs, this stunning stretch of sand and surf remains a vibrant presence. The restaurants and bars are open for business and beaches and pools cater to locals, day trippers and tourists alike – allowing for discounted prices and easier booking at some of the region’s finest hotels and resorts. To be clear, this is not Snookie’s Jersey Shore. Wave Resort, Long Branch, NJ Just over 55 miles south of Manhattan sits Long Branch. Once a holiday haven for seven US presidents, this resort town recently underwent a seaside makeover with it’s gleaming new Pier Village retail center. To take it up a notch and allow folks to spend more than a day at the beach, the chic Wave Resort opened to the public on Memorial Day weekend 2019. The six-story, 67 room hotel offers luxe, minimalist décor as well as a pool with swim-up bar and firepits, and stunning 180-degree ocean views. There are seven different restaurants and bars on the property and a kid’s area for the little ones. A fitness center, spa and blowout bar round out the amenities, and beach cruisers are available for local sightseeing. Asbury Ocean Club and The Asbury Hotel, Asbury Park, NJ Forget the Hamptons, Asbury Park is the new “It” destination for discerning beachcombers heading to NJ beaches. And though it may be best known as the springboard to Bruce Springsteen’s career, it is now home to two of the hippest joints lining the Atlantic Ocean. Both hotels are owned by full-service hospitality company Salt Hotels, yet they cater to uniquely different clientele. For those craving a little peace and quiet, The Ocean Club, perched on the fourth floor of this gleaming new 17-story high-rise, offers a cocooned retreat with a secluded pool deck and bar overlooking the ocean, lavish rooms and elevated service – including a shiny silver button which automatically refills your drinks while lounging. The rock n’ roll theme at The Asbury offers a more laid-back vibe, with a colorful, family friendly pool area, food truck and wine bar, and even a pool table and pinball machine in the lobby area. Rooms are more stripped down and comfortable, but include Quad and Octo rooms, with two and four bunk beds respectively – perfect for groups. Head to the rooftop lounge for craft cocktails and flawless sunsets. Hotel LBI, Long Beach Island, NJ Approximately midway between Philadelphia and New York City, this narrow barrier island has long been a favorite beach destination for locals in the know. Devoid of a boardwalk, LBI enjoys a marked lack of bar hoppers and party goers, making it a preferred destination for families – along with the 18 miles of relaxing, clean beaches and activities like mini golfing, surfing, parasailing and shopping. Newly opened this season is the expansive Hotel LBI, with 102 deluxe rooms, an indoor/outdoor pool and hot tub with retractable roof, fitness room, salon and spa. Like most of LBI’s smaller hotels and motels, Hotel LBI is a few blocks from the beach itself, but you’ll be able to take in sweeping views of the ocean and the bay from its rooftop deck and bar. Want to take a closer look at what the island has to offer? Complimentary cruisers are available to pedal around at your leisure. Ocean Casino, Atlantic City, NJ No, it’s not Vegas, but Atlantic City exudes its own glittering swagger, luring a discerning collection of beachgoers to this shining city of Monopoly-name proportions. A certain president with a head for marketing no longer touts a hotel on the boardwalk, but the recently renovated Ocean Resort and Casino makes the case for celebrity sightings. The massive tower holds nearly 1400 guest rooms, many with views of the ocean or the bay, and relaxing is made simple at one of three pools, a full-service spa and a bathhouse. Yes, there is the requisite casino with loyalty program and Ocean Rewards Club, for those who want to try their luck, but it’s the amenities that take this hotel above and beyond. Restaurants range from fine dining to quick casual, including eateries from Iron Chef Jose Garces and Marc Forgione, and a burger joint from Mark Wahlberg. There are also a handful or bars and lounges, including the Frose Daiquiri Lounge for frozen libations. A Topgolf swing suite provides entertainment of a different kind with a virtual golf course as well as an indoor gaming suite with baseball, dodgeball, hockey, football and carnival games—open to kids as well as adults. Finally, check the calendar for events at the cutting-edge Ovation Hall, which has hosted the likes of Beyonce and Barry Manilow. The Boarding House, Cape May, NJ One of the oldest seaside resort towns in the country, Cape May is closer to Philadelphia than New York City, and is known for its stately Victorian mansions and cultural events, like its namesake Jazz Festival and the New Jersey Film Festival. But with the newly renovated Boarding House comes a little retro surf chic – giving a hip kick to this seemingly proper locale. The hotel offers 11 unique rooms – each with a surfboard rack, original paintings and photography from local artists, a custom coffee blend from Cape May Roasters and handmade soaps by the village’s very own Shore Soaps. The beach is about 12 blocks away, but your stay includes free access to the hotel’s sister Montreal Beach Club, which includes two loungers and one umbrella per room. A basket of local breakfast goodies can be delivered to your room for $25 if you want to sleep in and yoga mats are just a phone call away. And did we mention it’s pet friendly? Seaview, A Dolce Hotel, Galloway, NJ After an $18 million upgrade and full renovation, the historic Seaview Hotel is ready for its close-up. Though technically on the Jersey Shore, teetering on the bay, the Seaview is best known for it’s nearly 700 acres of woods and 36 holes on two sprawling golf courses, one designed by famed designer Donald Ross. Stay in one of the nearly 300 art deco rooms and grab a cocktail in the iconic Lobby Bar and Lounge – all of which kept the architectural integrity of the 105-year-old resort. The indoor and outdoor pool are family-friendly, and if golf isn’t your thing, you can head to the tennis courts, hike the surrounding walking trails or make an appointment at the luxurious Elizabeth Arden Day Spa. Grab a meal at the Main Dining Room or the Coastal Grill, and look out for the Seasonal Seafood Buffet every Thursday night at 5pm.

    Budget Travel Lists

    10 National Historic Landmarks You Won't Believe Are Actually Landmarks

    Of the 90,000-some sites on the National Register of Historic Places, a list determined by the Department of the Interior’s National Park Service, only about 2,500 are deemed to have enough historical and cultural significance to be recognized as National Historic Landmarks. Churches, forts, historic homes, banks, bridges, and even boats are a dime a dozen. Lesser known, however, are the mining sites, landfills, and zany statues. Here are a few of the more unlikely sites that have had an impact on our culture and influenced who we are as Americans. 1. Lynch Knife River Flint Quarry: Stanton, North Dakota Several thousands of years before North Dakota’s oil mines triggered a Gold Rush-style blitz of industry, the Plains Indians in the area were mining flint, a resource so valuable to them that archaeologists insist that you can’t talk about the native culture without mentioning it. They mined over 150,000 pounds of the stuff to make arrowheads and other tools. One of the biggest quarries, the Lynch Quarry site, which spans over 690 acres, has, thanks to the efforts of local landowners, staved off development and infiltration by coal companies. It’s remained intact to the point that the anvils used to sharpen arrows and such are still there. Arguably the nation's most overlooked natural resource, it became a landmark in 2012. 2. Peavy-Hagline Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator: St. Lewis Park, Minnesota (McGhiever/Wikimedia Commons) Before there were skyscrapers and Space Needles or, for that matter, telephone poles, there were grain elevators. The Peavy-Hagline Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator, a rural tower that stretches 125 feet into the air, is the first of its kind in the United States and, it’s presumed, the world. Before it was built in 1900, elevators were made of wood, but this one was an architectural marvel of its time. According to the Minnesota Historical Society, it served as a model for future concrete structures built around the United States, satisfying the builders’ intention to prove that concrete could indeed be used in elevator construction. French architect LeCorbusier praised it as "the magnificent First Fruits of the new age." 3. Fresno Municipal Sanitary Landfill: Fresno, California For the most part, we take garbage pickup for granted these days: You put it out on your curb and it disappears. But regional sanitation systems are part of a tremendous, complex industry, and it’s come a long, long way as cities have expanded and developed. The Fresno Municipal Sanitary Landfill is ground zero for innovation in the sanitation industry. The creators of the landfill, which operated from 1935 to 1989, at which point it spanned 145 acres, are known for pioneering trenching, compacting, and daily burial techniques to tamp down on rodent issues and other problems. Urban problem-solving at its finest. 4. Lucy the Elephant: Margate City, New Jersey (Mary Katherine Wynn/Dreamstime) Dumbo notwithstanding, Lucy, located five miles from Atlantic City, is easily the most famous elephant in the United States. The six-story, nine-ton quadruped, originally made of wood and tin sheeting (she was buttressed with steel in 1970), has appeared in movies, television dramas, comic strips, various History Channel and Travel Channel specials, Mr. Roger's Neighborhood, and more. She's been a restaurant, offices, and a tavern. And as a testament to her endurance, she was virtually unscathed during Hurricane Sandy. Tourists visit her to climb the spiral staircase inside her to a hodwah on her back that delivers 360-degree views of the Jersey Shore. The National Park Service, which declared her a landmark in 1976, notes her as being a prime example of novelty architecture, an oversize structure designed in an unorthodox shape. 5. Howard High School: Wilmington, Delaware In 2005, when Howard High School in Wilmington, Delaware, became a National Historic Landmark, then state senator Joe Biden said in a statement, “The selection of Howard High School as a historic landmark is fitting because it encompasses both the struggles of our past and the promise of our future. Our hope is that this recognition will serve as a very visible and powerful reminder of just how far we have come and how much further we must still go." The school played a critical role in the landmark 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which declared it unconstitutional to segregate public schools. (The Brown case was actually a combination of five cases, including one that contested black students be bused to Howard, a black school, when a white high school was closer to their home.) Students here learn history not just from the books, but from their everyday surrounds. 6. American Flag Raising Site: Sitka, Alaska (Sphraner/Dreamstime) Really? A flagpole? Rest assured, it’s not just any old flagpole. The flagpole that marks Castle Hill, which was later renamed Baranof Castle State Historic Site, is where, in 1867, the Russians relinquished Alaska to the United States and, soon after, where the 49-star American flag was raised to commemorate Alaska’s new statehood for the first time. The pole is perched on a rock ridge that’s nearly 60 feet in the air, a prime perch for observing Sitka's gorgeous and historic cityscape. 7. Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1: Arco, Idaho Idaho is one of the 11 states that Lewis and Clark crossed during their epic expedition from 1804 to 1806, so, accordingly, the landscape is dotted with an assortment of landmarks marking their path. But there is one among them that has nothing to do with that dynamic duo: Declared a landmark in 1965, you might say the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 is where nuclear energy was born. The desert-situated decommissioned reactor was the world’s first nuclear power plant to generate electricity when, in 1951, it illuminated four 200-watt bulbs. This relic of the past is commemorated as a harbinger of the atomic-energy-driven future. 8. Fireproof Building: Charleston, South Carolina Many buildings are declared landmarks because they're where a historical person lived or died, a monumental event happened, or a company set up its manufacturing operation. There are loads of landmark banks, courts, jails, hotels, and churches. But only the grand Greek Revival-style County Records Building in Charleston carried the superlative classification of most fire-protected building when it was built in 1829, making it oldest fire-resistant building in all the land today. The structure is solid masonry and stucco, with iron shutters on triple windows, which allowed for more light, which meant less need for candles. These and other architectural features made it so sound that it survived the 1886 earthquake. In recent decades, it housed the South Carolina Historical Society, which renovated the building and opened it as a museum last summer. 9. Davis-Ferris Organ: Round Lake, New York (Courtesy Grace Mayo/Wikimedia Commons) The stately, massive Davis-Ferris Organ was built in 1847 for $2,500 and sat in Manhattan’s Calvary Episcopal Church until 1888, when it was purchased by a Methodist camp for $1,500 and moved to a town auditorium in Round Lake, a village in upstate New York that has been on the National Register of Historic Places itself since 1975. The instrument features pipes wide enough for a small child to crawl through, earned the approval of the National Parks Service in 2016. It’s said to be the oldest and largest organ of its type. (For any organ aficionados out there, that’s a three-manual organ, to be specific.) 10. Baltusrol Golf Club: Springfield, New Jersey A.W. Tillinghast, who passed away in 1942, is the Frank Gehry of golf courses. He designed more than 265 of them throughout his prolific career, and the 36-hole golf course at Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, New Jersey, which was completed in 1918, is often seen as one of his greatest achievements. In 1919, Golf Illustrated wrote, "What they are planning at Baltusrol is on a vaster scale than anything that has ever been attempted in American Golf.” It’s since played host to numerous professional tournaments, including seven U.S. Opens and two PGA Championships.

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    To Go or Not to Go: 2013

    Intrepid travelers like to push their limits—they'll test their stamina, language skills, and culinary daring in far-flung destinations around the globe. But we don't like to see anyone risk their personal safety on an ill-researched sojourn. So, each year Budget Travel gives you the lowdown on some spots that should, at least for the near term, stay on your "don't bother" list, some that are a definite "maybe," and a few that you may be surprised to hear get a definite "yes." SEE THE DESTINATIONS! Jersey Shore Sure, you know that Superstorm Sandy hit the New Jersey coastline last fall, tearing up boardwalks, hotels, vacation homes, and beaches. What you may not know, however, is that "the shore" will be open for business this summer. In fact, Lori Pepenella, Long Beach Island's destination marketing coordinator, recently told the Newark Star-Ledger, "As businesses are investing and rebuilding, we're getting the message out that we're open right now." While rebuilding post-Sandy is a challenge, especially for areas such as Seaside Heights, whose boardwalk sustained serious damage, New Jersey's $38 billion hospitality industry depends on a thriving shore and everyone is sprinting toward a successful Memorial Day weekend. For those of you who thought this might be the summer to skip New Jersey's miles of family-friendly beaches, legendary boardwalks and amusement parks, and notorious party scene, local boosters are working hard to change your mind: Atlantic City is telling anyone who will listen that contrary to rumor, its boardwalk was not destroyed by the hurricane, and Long Beach Island has produced a video to promote its open-for-business status at visitlbiregion.com. There's no quick fix, and the reopening of seaside businesses is only part of the to-do list (for the shore to truly roar back, neighboring vacation homes and hotels will have to be in good repair as well), but if optimism and hard work can carry the day, you should probably start making your Memorial Day weekend reservations... now! To Go or Not to Go: Go. Cuba For those of us who grew up during the Cold War, the question may still seem fanciful: Want to visit Cuba? But whereas the Caribbean island was once off-limits except to the most adventurous of American travelers (who would typically enter Mexico or Canada before flying to Cuba), it is now possible for U.S. citizens to see this amazing country by booking with a licensed tour operator that performs "people-to-people" trips. A package will include interaction with Cubans and classes in Cuban culture and history and should also include a visa, airfare, hotel, meals, and an experienced tour guide. They don't come cheap—week-long trips are often more than $2,000 per person—but are the best way to ensure that you comply with U.S. law and that you see the island in the safest way. While accurate crime statistics are not available from Cuba yet, the U.S. Department of State cautions visitors to be alert for pickpocketing, purse-snatching, and burglaries, but traveling with a licensed people-to-people tour guide will help minimize any danger. To Go or Not to Go: Go, if you can afford a U.S.-approved people-to-people tour. Spain It's a sign of the economic times that a nation of Spain's stature could even make our list of questionable destinations. The final quarter of 2012 saw Spain's economic output drop 1.8 percent compared with last year, its worst performance since the global economic meltdown of 2009. As the country embraced an austerity program to bring down its budget deficit, demonstrators took to the streets, often meeting an aggressive response from the police. In Barcelona, some demonstrators even demanded independence. It's important to keep all this in perspective, though: The U.S. Department of State has not issued a warning against visiting Spain, and the country still poses only the crime threats one might expect in any developed region: You need to be as aware of the potential for pickpocketing, mugging, and break-ins as you would when visiting, say, Italy or France. In addition, some of the advice the State Department has issued for visiting places like Greece and Israel, where the potential for spontaneous public demonstrations is high, should be heeded when visiting Spain: Stay away from demonstrations (they are not spectactor sports, and passersby have been swept up in police actions in Barcelona), and check with your hotel's concierge for updates on the potential for unrest in your destination. To Go or Not to Go: Go. Israel With some of the world's holiest sites, sacred to Jews, Muslims, and Christians alike, Israel is a one-of-a-kind destination. From the ancient streets of Jerusalem to the nightlife of Tel Aviv, this is a place where the past rubs elbows with the present like no other. Unfortunately, all that elbow-rubbing comes with a downside, and Israel has been the scene of religious tension, terrorist attacks, and flat-out war over the course of its 60+ years. The U.S. Department of State strongly warns Americans not to visit the Gaza Strip and most areas of the West Bank (other than Jericho and Bethlehem), due to ongoing tensions and risks that can range from rock-throwing to rocket fire. On the other hand, major cities such as Haifa and Tel Aviv are as safe as any in the world, and Jerusalem, as long as you observe some common-sense rules, is an unforgettable experience that shouldn't be missed. While in Jerusalem, avoid street protests and approach religious sites with caution on holy days, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays because of potential congestion and security restrictions. As with any troubled region, you will feel most supported and informed if you travel with an experienced tour operator and stay in touch with the staff at your hotel about the potential for political and religious demonstrations. To Go or Not to Go: Go, but avoid the West Bank and Gaza. Mexico Yes, millions of U.S. citizens visit Mexico safely each year, but as the U.S. Department of State points out, it's best to stick to major cities such as Mexico City and popular resort areas such as Los Cabos and destinations in Quintana Roo such as Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya, and Tulum, where the crime rate can actually be lower than in some U.S. cities. But more adventurous travelers should spend some time at state.gov reviewing the warnings about visiting border regions and some Mexican states (including Tamaulipas, Michoacan, Sonora, Chihuahua, and others) that have seen heavy drug-trafficking activity, including daytime gun battles, carjackings, and kidnappings. Regardless of where you travel in Mexico, be prepared for the same risks you might encountering when visiting any American city. To Go or Not to Go: Go, but only to major cities and resort towns. Japan 2012 saw an increase of 30 percent in tourism to Japan over the preceding year, according to the Japan National Tourist Organization. It's no wonder people stayed away in 2011: In March of that year the nation was rocked by the largest earthquake in its history, a magnitude 9 quake that destroyed buildings and triggered a tsunami on the island's northeast coast, causing the deaths of thousands and a meltdown at a major nuclear-power plant, including a release of dangerous radiation. But millions have returned to Japan in the past year, buoyed by the nation's swift recovery efforts. Today, major destinations such as Tokyo are completely safe and 2013 may even set a record for visitors. To Go or Not to Go: Go, as long as you avoid the area around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear-power plant. Egypt The political unrest that rocked Egypt two years ago, including public uprisings against then-president Hosni Mubarak, certainly put Egypt front-and-center on the world stage, and inspired some to delay travel plans to the north African nation. But sites such as the pyramids and Great Sphinx at Luxor, museums and historical sites in Cairo, and the beauty of the Lower Nile (now enjoying a resurgence in river cruises) still inspire waves of visitors, and the U.S. Department of State does not explicitly warn Americans away from Egypt. It does suggest that you stay away from public demonstrations, which can be unpredictable and sometimes turn violent. Visiting Egypt with an experienced tour guide, or staying in a major hotel whose concierge regularly monitors the potential for unrest, is your best bet.   To Go or Not to Go: Go, but, for now, stick with well-trod tourist sites such as Cairo and Luxor. Greece There's no sugar-coating it: The economic downturn and austerity measures have inspired strikes and public demonstrations in Greece, especially in major squares in the capital city of Athens. While they are usually peaceful and pose no threat to the democratic government, some demonstrations have turned violent, including fire-bombings and vandalism. It's best to avoid ogling demonstrations because of their potential to turn ugly. Americans visiting Athens should be aware that anti-migrant sentiment can make some visitors targets of aggressive behavior—and even police sweeps. The U.S. Department of State especially cautions Americans of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Middle Eastern descent to be on guard because they may be mistaken for migrants. All Americans should carry a copy of a passport or photo ID at all times. That said, tourism to Greece is still a booming business—major hotels in Athens, resorts on the islands, and other destinations with knowledgeable staff and on-site security are not only safe but among the most rewarding vacation spots you could choose. To Go or Not to Go: Go to the islands, stick to the beaten path in Athens. Haiti When we say a travel destination "has it all," we usually don't mean crime, cholera, damaged infrastructure, and limited police and medical resources. Unfortunately, that is the situation in Haiti three years after a magnitude-7 earthquake demolished much of the already-impoverished nation (which shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic), killing more than 300,000 people. While Haiti has spent billions just to maintain basic services, risks are high and resources for visitors are slim—traveling there as anything but a volunteer will only add to the strain. The U.S. Department of State warns that Americans have been victims of murder and kidnapping, including attacks on arriving visitors that have occurred right outside the Port-au-Prince airport. To Go or Not to Go: Don't go. Syria Sure, Syria boasts some of the most dramatic ruins and landmarks in the Middle East, but this one's a no-brainer: "No part of Syria should be considered immune from violence," reports the U.S. Department of State, warning Americans not to visit the troubled nation (and those Americans who remain in Syria are urged to leave immediately). Anti-government activity and the Syrian government's use of deadly force—including aerial bombing of civilian areas, armed clashes between government and opposition groups, and the arrest, detention, and torture of individuals—have made Syria one of the most dangerous places on earth. And once inside, it can be difficult to get a flight out or to cross the border into neighboring countries, which include Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Israel. To Go or Not to Go: Don't go.

    Inspiration

    6 Great Destinations That Survived Sandy

    It's almost impossible to shake the dramatic images of waves crashing over Casino Pier's iconic roller coaster after it was pushed into the Atlantic during Hurricane Sandy. Our hearts broke with the news of entire communities throughout the east coast being ravaged by ferocious floods and in the unfortunate case of Breezy Point, NY, unstoppable fires. Despite such suffering and turmoil, people came together to help each other, communities worked together, and one year later, things are looking a whole lot better. While so much work still needs to be done in many of New York and New Jersey's residential areas, several popular destinations have bounced back. From the Hamptons to the Jersey Shore, here are six popular places that survived the storm and why you should pay them a visit. CONEY ISLAND Despite the storm, Coney Island's signature amusement park, Luna Park, was able to open its summer 2013 season right on schedule, thanks in part to hundreds of volunteers from all five boroughs who came together to help rebuild the area's playgrounds, streets, churches, and iconic boardwalk. Luna Park recently unveiled Water Mania, a new ride similar to Disney's Tea Cup attraction that lets visitors spray water cannons at other riders as they spin around. Luna Park will open two new rides this summer, and plans to bring back the Thunderbolt, a 125-foot tall, 2,000-foot long roller coaster that will reach speeds of up to 65 miles per hour, in 2014. Pay a visit to Coney Island's timeless attractions, brave the almighty Cyclone, and take a ride on the historic B&B Carousel in the newly christened Steeplechase Plaza. If all else fails, you can always stop for a bite at Nathan's Famous, home of the original Coney Island Hot Dog. ATLANTIC CITY Contrary to popular belief, Atlantic City was not hit hard by Hurricane Sandy last fall and was actually back on its feet within a week of the storm-in fact the area still continues to bounce back post-Sandy with new openings and events along its iconic stretch of New Jersey coastline. The Tropicana Casino and Resort opened six new restaurants and AC's iconic Steel Pier debuted eight new rides this summer. Ultra-chic hotel Revel also opened its new HQ Beach Club over Memorial Day weekend, a nightclub modeled after the posh décor of Mykonos that features pools, bungalows, bars, DJs, and a new dance floor. For free family-friendly entertainment, don't miss AC Dreamin', a new 3-D light show featuring catchy music and creative, thought-provoking images against the façade of Boardwalk Hall every half hour between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m nightly. LOWER MANHATTAN While images of the New York City subway system overflowing with floodwaters might still come to mind, it's important to remember that things are for the most part back to normal in Lower Manhattan. Shop for farm fresh produce at one of the Greenmarkets Downtown-try the Bowling Green Greenmarket at Broadway and Battery Place every Tuesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. thru Dec. 26th, or the Staten Island Ferry Terminal Greenmarket, every Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. thru Dec. 31st. Treat the family to a picnic in Battery Park with views of the Statue of Liberty or take advantage of the City's new Citi Bike Stations and take a bike tour Lower Manhattan at your own pace. MONTAUK AND THE HAMPTONS While Long Island didn't receive as much television coverage during Sandy compared to other places, Montauk, the Hamptons, and most of Long Island's beaches endured large amounts of flooding and beach erosion as a result of the storm. Trees fell, water rose, and power outages were rampant. Luckily, one year later, the beaches are in much better shape. According to an article byCurbed Hamptons, $700 million was recently approved by Congress to go towards rebuilding Long Island's South Shore, namely Montauk, Hampton Bays, East Quogue, and West Hampton Dunes Village-East Hampton Town is bringing in roughly 10,000 yards of sand to support Ditch Plains since the project reportedly won't begin until late next year. THE JERSEY SHORE If New Jersey's Stronger than the Storm campaign is any indication, the Jersey Shore has bounced back from the effects of Hurricane Sandy with courage, style, and grace. This summer, the beaches were open from Long Beach Island all the way down to Cape May and area hotels, B&Bs, restaurants, and shops are eagerly awaiting your visit. Check out the Stronger Than The Storm Fall Guide for a list of haunted houses, hayrides, corn mazes, pick-your-own pumpkin and apple farms, and the best places to see fall colors. 26 B&Bs and Inns along the Jersey Shore are also participating in Back Inn Business, a campaign offering 10 percent off rates for Sunday-Thursday stays this October in honor of the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. STATEN ISLAND Here's a novel idea: take a free ride on the Staten Island Ferry from Manhattan and actually stick around to explore the fifth borough before heading back to the City. There's a lot going on in Staten Island. History buffs shouldn't miss the chance to explore Fort Wadsworth, one of the oldest military sites in the country, Historic Richmond Town, an 11-acre living history museum on New York City's oldest farm, and Sandy Ground, a community settled in the 1800s by freed slaves from New York, Delaware, and Maryland that later became an important stop on the Underground Railroad. Visit the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art, the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum, and the Snug Harbor Cultural Center for a taste of culture on one of New York City's most culturally diverse boroughs.

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    DESTINATION IN New Jersey

    South Jersey

    Jersey City is the second-most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey, after Newark. It is the seat of Hudson County as well as the county's largest city. The 2020 U.S. census showed that the city's population was 292,449 in 2020, ranking as the 71st-most-populous incorporated place in the nation. The 2020 census represents an increase of 18.1% from the 2010 United States census, when the city's population was at 247,597. Jersey City, with a population density of 17,396 inhabitants per square mile (6,717/km2) as of 2013, had the third-highest density of any U.S. city with over 100,000 people, behind only New York City (27,781 people per square mile of land) and San Francisco (17,859).After a peak population of 316,715 measured in the 1930 census, the city's population saw a half-century-long decline to 223,532 in the 1980 census. Since then, the city's population has rebounded, with the 2020 population reflecting an increase of 44,852 (18.1%) from the 247,597 counted in the 2010 Census, which had an increase of 7,542 (+3.1%) from the 240,055 counted in the 2000 census, which had in turn increased by 11,518 (+5.0%) from the 228,537 counted in the 1990 census.Part of the New York metropolitan area, Jersey City is bounded on the east by the Hudson River and Upper New York Bay and on the west by the Hackensack River and Newark Bay. A port of entry, with 30.7 miles (49.4 km) of waterfront and extensive rail infrastructure and connectivity, the city is an important transportation terminus and distribution and manufacturing center for the Port of New York and New Jersey. Jersey City shares significant mass transit connections with Manhattan. Redevelopment of the Jersey City waterfront has made the city one of the largest centers of banking and finance in the United States and has led to the district and city being nicknamed Wall Street West.

    DESTINATION IN New Jersey

    Long Beach

    Long Beach Township is a Walsh Act Township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,051 reflecting a decline of 278 (-8.4%) from the 3,329 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 78 (-2.3%) from the 3,407 counted in the 1990 Census.Most of the township is located on Long Beach Island, a barrier island along the Atlantic Ocean whose summer population swells to as much as 130,000, including part-time residents and tourists. In October 2012, Long Beach Township was severely affected by Hurricane Sandy, with township mayor Joe Mancini estimating that potential costs to repair the damage estimated as high as $1 billion across Long Beach Island. As a result of the storm surge, flooding and high winds, dozens of homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed. After the waters receded, streets were left covered with up to four feet of sand in some spots. Governor Chris Christie issued a mandatory evacuation order on October 28, and it remained in place until a full 13 days after the storm. The township established a Sandy Relief Fund to assist residents in their recovery from the hurricane.Long Beach Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1899, from portions of Eagleswood Township, Little Egg Harbor Township, Ocean Township, Stafford Township and Union Township (now known as Barnegat Township). Portions of the township were taken to form Barnegat City (March 29, 1904, now Barnegat Light) and Ship Bottom-Beach Arlington (March 3, 1925, now Ship Bottom). The name derives from the length of the island along Barnegat Bay.

    DESTINATION IN New Jersey

    Southern Shore

    The Jersey Shore (known by locals as The Shore) is the coastal region of the U.S. state of New Jersey. Geographically, the term encompasses about 141 miles (227 km) of oceanfront bordering the Atlantic Ocean, from Perth Amboy in the north to Cape May Point in the south. The region includes Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic, and Cape May counties, which are in the central and southern parts of the state. The Jersey Shore hosts the highest concentration of oceanside boardwalks in the United States. Famous for its many boardwalks with arcades, amusement parks, and water parks boasting hundreds of rides and attractions, the Jersey Shore is a popular vacation spot with residents of North Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. Certain shore communities are also popular with visitors from the nearby states of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, as well as the Canadian province of Quebec. Due to New Jersey's peninsular geography, both sunrise and sunset are visible over water from different points on the Jersey Shore. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 devastated much of the northern part of the region, and spawned the demolition and rebuilding of entire neighborhoods, with reinvention on a physically and financially elevated and economically upscale level; this process of gentrification is rapidly escalating property values and transforming many communities on the Jersey Shore into a second home for the New York financial community, akin to the more established Hamptons.