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    Farmington,

    New Mexico

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    Farmington is a city in San Juan County in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census the city had a total population of 45,877 people. Farmington (and surrounding San Juan County) makes up one of the four Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in New Mexico. The U.S. Census Bureau's population estimate in 2019 for Farmington was 44,372.Farmington is located at the junction of the San Juan River, the Animas River, and the La Plata River, and is located on the Colorado Plateau. Farmington is the largest city of San Juan County, one of the geographically largest counties in the United States covering 5,538 square miles (14,340 km2). The county seat and the other city in San Juan County is Aztec. Farmington serves as the commercial hub for most of northwestern New Mexico and the Four Corners region of four states. Farmington lies at or near the junction of three important highways: U.S. Highway 550, U.S. Highway 64, and New Mexico Highway 371. It is on the Trails of the Ancients Byway, one of the designated New Mexico Scenic Byways.The primary industries of San Juan County are the production of petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Major coal mines are the Navajo and San Juan mines, operated by BHP Billiton 15 to 19 miles (24 to 31 km) southwest of Farmington. The coal mined from the Navajo and San Juan mines is used entirely for fuel for the nearby Four Corners Generating Station and San Juan Generating Station to produce electric power.
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    Farmington Articles

    Inspiration

    Your Vacation Lodging Is About to Get Way More Beautiful

    If you've ever dreamed of sleeping over in a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece or exchanging your prewar fourth-floor walk-up for an off-grid glass house in the California desert, we've got good news. The website PlansMatter, a hub for design-savvy vacation rentals and hotels around the world, has curated a roster of properties to make even the most avid Architectural Digest subscriber drool.  Launched in 2013 by two friends from architecture school, the platform places a premium on good looks, great bones, and beautiful locations, from the most photographed house on Australia's Great Ocean Road to an underground villa in Switzerland with a facade that blends into the  hills, reachable only via a tunnel that starts in an adjacent shed and burrows through the mountain. Of course, such cutting-edge properties come at a price, and while we can’t in good conscience recommend dropping $1,000 a night on a house in Topanga (stunning as it may be), the site does offer a few bargains for the budget-oriented architecture buff. These options may be a bit more rustic than their highbrow brethren, but they still provide the designer touches and modernist details of contemporary classics.  AN AWARD-WINNING LANDSCAPE IN MINNESOTA Whitetail Woods Camper CabinsFarmington, MN$75 per night You don’t normally associate a public park with AIA-award-winning design, but in Dakota County, Minnesota, that’s just what you’ll find. In the heart of Whitetail Woods Regional Park stand three ramp-accessible camper cabins, open year-round and surrounded by pine trees, hiking trails, and wildlife. The elevated structures give off a fancy treehouse vibe, with sleek cedar-clad interiors, floor-to-ceiling glass windows, heat, electricity, and wifi. Online reservations can be made 365 days out, and you’ll definitely want to book well in advance, especially for a weekend stay—Friday and Saturday nights get snapped up right away. DESIGN-FORWARD HUTS WITH MOUNTAIN VIEWS Rolling HutsWinthrop, WA$145 per night Nestled in an alpine meadow, the site of a former RV campground is now home to a “herd” of minimalist rolling wood-and-steel huts. Boasting unobstructed mountain vistas, these glass-fronted, shoebox-shaped structures have wood-burning fireplaces, heating and air conditioning, modest cork and plywood interiors, and covered decks for indoor-outdoor living. There’s wifi, but no indoor plumbing—each hut has a water faucet and a portable toilet outside, with communal showers and proper toilets located in a nearby barn, an inconvenience offset by the sheer beauty of the view. A HISTORIC COTTAGE IN THE OZARKS StoneflowerHeber Springs, AR$199 per night A juxtaposition of stone and sky in the Arkansas Ozarks, this E. Fay Jones-designed cottage earned a spot on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002, and it hasn’t lost its luster in the intervening years. With a cave-like lower level constructed from salvaged boulders, featuring stone walls, sofa bases, and a shower reminiscent of a grotto; a soaring, steel-and-glass main level with a 30-foot deck, a vintage kitchenette, air conditioning, and infrared heating; and an upper level with a sleeping loft overlooking the treetops, Stoneflower appears to spring fully formed from the rocky terrain below. It’s not at all child-proofed, though, so save this one for an adults-only getaway.

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    DESTINATION IN Colorado

    Pagosa Springs

    The Town of Pagosa Springs is the Home rule municipality that is the county seat, the most populous community, and the only incorporated municipality in Archuleta County, Colorado, United States. The population was 1,727 at the 2010 census. Approximately 65 percent of the land in Archuleta County is either San Juan National Forest, Weminuche and South San Juan Wilderness areas, or Southern Ute Indian land. Pagosa Springs and the surrounding county are both experiencing a substantial influx of second-home owners; a 2006 property assessment indicates that 60% of area private properties are owned by non-residents. Pagosa Springs is located approximately 35 miles (56 km) north of the New Mexico border, at 7,126 feet (2,172 m) above sea level on the Western Slope of the Continental Divide. This combination of high desert plateau and the Rocky Mountains to the north and east creates an unusually mild climate, especially in the summer months. Pagosa sees around 300 days of sun each year, as well as four distinct seasons.The town is located in the upper San Juan Basin, surrounded by the 3-million-acre (4,700 sq mi; 12,000 km2) San Juan National Forest, and adjacent to the largest wilderness area in the state of Colorado, the Weminuche Wilderness. The town is named for the sulfur springs located there, including the world's deepest geothermal hot spring. This "Mother Spring" feeds the primitive hot spring soaking pools located on the banks of the San Juan River which flows through town. These hot springs are free and public. The Mother Spring also feeds developed soaking pools hosted by three local hot spring soaking locations within town. The water from the "Mother" Spring is approximately 144 °F (62 °C). The Ute people called the sulfur-rich mineral springs Pah gosah, which is commonly translated in modern documents as "healing waters"; a Ute elder once translated the phrase as "water (pah) that has a bad smell (gosah)."Other recreational activities in the area include downhill and cross country skiing at nearby Wolf Creek ski area and snowmobiling in the surrounding National Forest. Summertime activities include fishing, hiking, and rafting. The area is also a popular destination for hunters, who harvest elk, deer, and other game animals. "Downtown Pagosa Springs" was the final destination for a duo of truckers in the 1975 country song "Wolf Creek Pass" by C. W. McCall. From Wolf Creek pass to town, U.S. Highway 160 goes through a vertical drop of 3,730 feet (1,140 m), and is described in the song as "hairpin county and switchback city".

    DESTINATION IN Colorado

    Silverton

    The historic Town of Silverton is the Statutory Town that is the county seat, the most populous community, and the only incorporated municipality in San Juan County, Colorado, United States. The town is located in a remote part of the western San Juan Mountains, a range of the Rocky Mountains. The first mining claims were made in mountains above the Silverton in 1860, near the end of the Colorado Gold Rush and when the land was still controlled by the Utes. Silverton was established shortly after the Utes ceded the region in the 1873 Brunot Agreement, and the town boomed from silver mining until the Panic of 1893 led to a collapse of the silver market, and boomed again from gold mining until the recession caused by the Panic of 1907. The entire town is included as a federally designated National Historic Landmark District, the Silverton Historic District. Originally called "Bakers Park", Silverton sits in a flat area of the Animas River valley and is surrounded by steep peaks. Most of the peaks surrounding Silverton are thirteeners, the highest being Storm Peak, at 13,487 feet. The town is less than 15 miles from 7 of Colorado's 53 fourteeners, and is known as one of the premier gateways into the Colorado backcountry. Silverton's last operating mine closed in 1992, and the community now depends primarily on tourism and government remediation and preservation projects. Silverton is well known because of the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, a former mine train that is now a National Historic Landmark, and internationally recognized events such as the Hardrock Hundred Mile Endurance Run. The town population reached 637 in the U.S. Census 2010.