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  • Folly Beach, South Carolina
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    Folly Beach,

    South Carolina

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    Folly Beach is a semi-private city on Folly Island in Charleston County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 2,617 at the 2010 census, up from 2,116 in 2000. Folly Beach is within the Charleston-North Charleston-Summerville metropolitan area and the Charleston-North Charleston Urbanized Areas.
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    Folly Beach Articles

    Inspiration

    5 perfect rentals for plant lovers

    The home gardening trend that bloomed during the pandemic has planted roots for the long term, with nurseries continuing to report record sales as consumers test and refine their green thumbs. Plant-loving travelers looking to take their plant parentings skills to the next level will be rewarded with stays at these five botanical vacation rentals courtesy of Vacasa, the leading full-service vacation rental management company in North America. As an added bonus, there are parks, greenhouses, gardens and more nearby, offering plenty of additional opportunities to enjoy nature’s beauty in full bloom. Source: Vacasa Arcadian Gardens (Sequim, Washington) - It’s fitting that this vacation home is in The Evergreen State, where an indoor koi pond—and hot tub—are surrounded by an impressive display of tropical plants that create a jungle-like oasis. Spend an afternoon at Pioneer Memorial Park, a beautiful 4-acre park and arboretum located right downtown and maintained by the Sequim Prairie Garden Club. Home Run House (Warren, Vermont) - This custom-built vacation home uses greenery to soften the steely gray of its industrial-style interior architecture, with a two-story living wall of plants and a forest of potted trees. Nearby, the Von Trapp Greenhouse in Waitsfield has been growing all of its own plants from seeds, cuttings, or divisions for more than 40 years. Source: Vacasa Mellow Marsh (Folly Beach, South Carolina) - Wicker baskets and plant stands dot the living area of this beachside rental, proving that even with a view of palm trees from the deck, a fiddle leaf fig tree can really bring a space to life. Head about 20 minutes inland to Charleston and stroll through acres upon acres of romantic blooms at the popular Middleton Place or Magnolia Garden. Source: Vacasa Yellowtail Home in the Meadow (Big Sky, Montana) - This Big Sky sun porch, complete with skylights, is decked out with a container garden of trees that artfully brings the outdoors in, but will keep any chilly evening temps at bay. An abundance of wildflowers line area hiking trails nearby, including Beehive Basin and Cinnamon Mountain, but remember to leave the colorful buds rooted—picking them is against hiker (and plant enthusiast) etiquette. Tabor Treehouse (Portland, Oregon) - As a house in a plant, this vacation rental gives guests the true “one with nature” experience. If that’s not enough, nearby Leach Botanical Garden (which unveiled a $12 million renovation this spring) is home to a diverse collection of more than 2,000 plants across its 16.5 acres Source: Vacasa This content has been provided in partnership with Vacasa.

    Inspiration

    Live Like a Local in the ‘First in Flight’ State

    Whether you’re an adventure-seeker in pursuit of an adrenaline-pumping spree of parasailing, cycling, climbing, waterfalls, skydiving, and hot-air ballooning, an American history buff, or a nature lover in search of achingly beautiful beaches, North Carolina is rich with options for the intrepid traveler. The biggest challenge is making the most of your time, so we’ve searched the state and checked in with some locals who maintain some of the most gorgeously trip-inspiring NC-themed Instagram accounts to learn about the standout places to eat, drink, stay, and play during your visit. From the outdoor adventures in Boone to the museums and restaurants of Charlotte to the beaches of the Outer Banks, North Carolina has all the makings of a memorable vacation, regardless of whether it’s your first or tenth time visiting. THE OUTER BANKS Folly Beach near Charleston, South Carolina. (Cvandyke/Dreamstime)When it comes to tried-and-true, the Outer Banks, a 130-mile stretch of barrier islands on the north coast of North Carolina, delivers a wide assortment of vacation opportunities. Magnificent beaches, winery tours, exceptional seafood, and iconic lighthouses are all yours for the taking. And, appropriately enough for the “First in Flight” state, you can savor it all from the sky on a classic biplane tour. Elizabeth Boyette (@elizabeth_boyette on Instagram), an avid traveler and proprietor of Good South, a design firm with offices in Raleigh, NC, and Charleston, SC, suggests the area around Currituck National Wildlife Refuge, the northern end of the “OBX” (local parlance for the area). A longtime resident of Raleigh who recently relocated to Charleston, Boyette just came back from a trip to Duck, in Dare County, and reports that “the Outer Banks is truly something special. ” She notes that equine aficionados in particular should head north to Currituck County while they’re on the islands. “Make sure to take a tour of the wild horses on the beach in Corolla, a one-of-a-kind experience,” she says. BOONE & BLOWING ROCK The jaw-dropping scenery of the Boone region of the Blue Ridge Parkway is reason alone to visit this bucolic town. Along the area’s stretch of highway you’ll find more than 50 hiking trails and over 20 overlooks where you can picnic and take in the landscape. In town, there are sites that showcase and honor the town’s rich history. Check out Hickory Ridge Museum, which features actors in period dress engaged in old-world activities, and more than 200 species of plant varieties at Daniel Boone Native Gardens, named for the trailblazing frontiersman who spent time in the region. While it’s absolutely stunning on the ground, there’s plenty more to be seen from above. At Grandfather Mountain, an international Biosphere Reserve, there’s the Mile High Swinging Bridge, America’s highest suspension bridge since it was built in 1952, which delivers heart-stopping 360-degree views of the Carolina Piedmont. For a more modern thrill, head to the neighboring town of Blowing Rock, where the new Ultimate Adventure park boasts ziplines, a giant swing, and activities for kids ages four and up. And when you’re ready to kick back and chill out, fishing, shopping—including old-timey stores—and an array of relaxing spas await. ASHEVILLE You may have heard that Asheville is one cool little city, and we’d be the first to agree. Budget Travel’s senior editor, Liza Weisstuch, visited recently and is still talking about the imaginative restaurant scene, creative arts, and craft beer. And you can pretty much take your pick of nearby outdoor adventures, including zip-lining, canopy tours, and hot air ballooning. Karie Reinertson and Rob Maddox, who run Shelter Collective (@shelterprotectsyou on Instagram), an architecture and interior design shop in Asheville, share their locals-only secrets: “We love spending a rainy Saturday at Well Played, a board game cafe we designed in downtown. East Fork Pottery is perfect for outfitting an entire home or picking up a quick guest’s gift. OWL is one of our favorite places to grab a coffee and some of the best pastries in town. The best way to spend time in Asheville, though, is outdoors - our favorite hike is Black Balsam, which starts with a beautiful drive up the Blue Ridge Parkway.” RALEIGH-DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, North Carolina. (Coralimages2020/Dreamstime)North Carolina’s centrally located Piedmont Region boasts some of the most populous cities in the state, and the Triangle offers an urbane alternative to the sun and sand of the coast, thanks in large part to the area’s trifecta of universities (North Carolina State, Duke, and the University of North Carolina). In Raleigh, start with a visit to the North Carolina Museum of Art, with a collection spanning more than 5,000 years and includes pieces from Europe, America, and Africa and a sculpture park marrying a three-mile trail system and an outdoor amphitheater with 29 works of art. Follow up with a stop at the Raleigh Farmers Market for a snack, then spend the afternoon winery-hopping. For dinner, try something from chef Ashley Christensen’s local mini-empire. Poole’s Diner is justifiably renowned for its rich, cheesy macaroni au gratin, and anything from the wood-fired oven at Death & Taxes (think: roasted oysters with preserved lemon and chili butter) is bound to be a hit. Over in Durham, there’s a wealth of creative endeavors, from grand museums to funky galleries. Check out the artist studios at historic textile mill Golden Belt, browse the contemporary collection at Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art, and get lost in the terraces, gazebos, and Japanese-style walking bridges of Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Break for lunch with a fried chicken, pimento cheese, and bacon biscuit from Rise, and spend the afternoon antiquing before catching a show at the Pinhook, a bastion of the indie-music scene. Get your learning on in Chapel Hill, where the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center offers shows to please all ages, and UNC’s Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History features a roster of year-round events in keeping with its mission of supporting the critical examination of the African-American diaspora and African cultures. Pick up picnic provisions at Southern Season, then head for the North Carolina Botanical Garden for lunch al fresco. Sample the house-made vodka, gin, and whiskey at Top of the Hill Distillery, treat yourself to shrimp and grits at Crook’s Corner, then take in the symphony at Hill Hall Auditorium on the UNC campus. CHARLOTTE Charlotte, North Carolina’s biggest city, packs the most art, history, music, and food into a visit, including former plantations, Southern cuisine with creative twists, and an array of museums to suit all tastes, like the Levine Museum of the New South, which focuses on post-Civil War life in the region, and the NASCAR Hall of Fame, a sport that has its roots in the area, thanks to bootlegging outlaws who were constantly trying to outrun the authorities during Prohibition. Somewhat unexpectedly, the central NC area also boasts ample opportunities for skydiving. And if you’d like to make a day trip, Boyette suggests skipping town for Davidson, a lakeside town about 20 miles north. “When you’re around Charlotte, I recommend a stop in Davidson, which has a college-town charm, to eat at Kindred. From the food to the atmosphere, it’s perfection. Two words: milk bread. And the oysters are a must-order.” WILMINGTON & ISLAND BEACHES “My parents had a condo in Wrightsville Beach for years and it really is one of the most quaint, prettiest beaches in the state,” says Boyette. While Wilmington and its beaches were hit especially hard by Hurricane Florence in September, its recovery is well under way and its locals are eager to host travelers. Boyette recommends perusing the beach and checking out the Baja fish tacos at K38 across the bridge in Wilmington. Budget Travel’s associate editor, Maya Stanton, has her own mouthwatering restaurant reviews, including Savorez for tuna tostadas and Catch for crabcakes. If you need a break from seafood and the beach, pencil in a tour through one of the city’s many historic homes or visit the Cameron Art Museum for a glimpse into Wilmington’s culture and history. KINSTON Heading inland a bit, there’s a world of history and authentic NC cuisine to be found in the town of Kinston, in Lenoir County, the site of one of the most significant and hard-fought battles of the Civil War, now commemorated by a historic walking path and tour. In keeping with the vintage trend, look for accommodations at the Mother Earth Motor Lodge, a motel dating to 1963 that, in its previous incarnation, gave shelter to the touring musicians such as James Brown and his band as they passed through town. Local craft-beer brand Mother Earth Brewing took over and gave the property a facelift in 2017, and it now offers 45 upgraded rooms as well as a pool, shuffleboard, and mini-golf. For a dose of star-power, make a reservation for creative regional fare at James Beard award-winner and PBS host Vivian Howard’s Chef & the Farmer, or grab a seat at her more casual sister restaurant, the Boiler Room oyster bar. Crystal Thornton, a photographer who maintains one of the most beautiful NC-themed Instagram accounts out there (@seastarnc), recommends Kinston for “an absolute gem of a BBQ joint by the name of King’s Bar-B-Que and Chicken. It serves a sandwich called the Pig in a Puppy, a North Carolina-style BBQ in a sub-sandwich sized hush puppy.” May we simply add … Yum!

    Road Trips

    #BTRoadTrip: Tallahassee, Florida, to Charleston, South Carolina

    Hop in the passenger's seat on the ultimate road trip! We're posting real-time dispatches as Budget Travel's Photo Editor, Whitney Tressel, journeys across the country using tips from locals as her guide. Prepare for beautiful beaches and parks, amazing local cuisine, and one-of-a-kind experiences you only get when you talk to the real Americans who make this country great. Is it over already? After two weeks chock-full of unique towns, local eats, and activities from two-stepping to peacock-spotting, Whitney's cross-country road trip came to a close. But not before she pumped the brakes in order to settle into Georgia's slow southern pace, eventually winging her way up to South Carolina, to see the sun set quite literally on her trip. Dusk in Savannah. As the sun melted like hot butter over the horizon, over the rooftop of Whitney's hotel, she plotted her morning journey to Clary's Cafe for breakfast, on the recommendation of a local she met back in Tallahassee. Once there, a plate of perfect eggs florentine, two bright-yellow paprika-sprinkled hills, cozied up with a generous bowl of grits, materialized in front of Whitney. A side of homemade corned beef hash? Why not? Whitney hopscotched among Savannah's 22 lush, grassy squares to iconic Forsyth Park, draped in the Spanish moss that's inseparable from the idea of Savannah as a city. Trivia: The historic park was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the same landscape architect who designed New York City's Central Park. After capturing the trees and fountains on camera and doing some serious people-watching and music-listening—musicians constantly play in the park—Whitney took her time meandering along the river, stopping at Savannah's Candy Kitchen for a candy-dipped apple crisscrossed with ribbons of white and dark chocolate to bite into as she took in the water views. Pre-dinner candy aside, this is the south: There's always more room for home cookin'. The Olde Pink House restaurant has a much-deserved reputation for its classic dishes, including "southern sushi," smoked shrimp and grits rolled in coconut-crusted nori, and a side of "hoppin' john," black-eyed peas and rice that Whitney spooned up like it was her last meal on the road. But not so fast: One last southern state loomed on the horizon as Whitney zoomed up I-17. Folly Beach, South Carolina, grabbed her attention immediately with its classic Atlantic Coast vibe: locals fishing, eating ice cream, playing volleyball, dipping their toes in the surf, and lolling about on the sand. Come dinnertime, Whitney bellied up to the Folly Beach Crab Shack and ordered up a dish of crab balls with with rémoulade for less than 10 bucks, then set out for the best place to watch the sunset, according to a couple fishing on the pier.As Whitney watched the horizon shift from orange to pink to navy from a boat marina between Folly Beach and Charleston, she let her mind drift back to the start of her trip, her thoughts running backward across the country, up and down the south's peaks and valleys, past its ocean vistas, along the open road, accompanied only by her camera, now full of freeze-framed vistas, natural beauty, and the faces of new friends. Whitney's Final Travel Tip: Don't hesitate to travel alone. The act of traveling with others is irrefutably awesome, but embarking on a solo journey births new and different experiences that, quite honestly, couldn't happen if you weren't by yourself, surrounded by everything unfamiliar. Previously:#BTRoadTrip: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to Tallahassee, Florida#BTRoadTrip: Del Rio, Texas, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana#BTRoadTrip: Tucson to Del Rio, Texas#BTRoadTrip: San Diego to Tucson#BTRoadTrip: Los Angeles to San Diego

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    DESTINATION IN South Carolina

    Charleston

    Charleston is the largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had a population of 150,277 as of the 2020 U.S. Census. The 2020 population of the Charleston metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, was 799,636 residents, the third-largest in the state and the 74th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States. Charleston was founded in 1670 as Charles Town, honoring King Charles II, at Albemarle Point on the west bank of the Ashley River (now Charles Towne Landing) but relocated in 1680 to its present site, which became the fifth-largest city in North America within ten years. It remained unincorporated throughout the colonial period; its government was handled directly by a colonial legislature and a governor sent by Parliament. Election districts were organized according to Anglican parishes, and some social services were managed by Anglican wardens and vestries. Charleston adopted its present spelling with its incorporation as a city in 1783. Population growth in the interior of South Carolina influenced the removal of the state government to Columbia in 1788, but Charleston remained among the ten largest cities in the United States through the 1840 census.Charleston's significance in American history is tied to its role as a major slave trading port. Charleston slave traders like Joseph Wragg were the first to break through the monopoly of the Royal African Company and pioneered the large-scale slave trade of the 18th century; almost one half of slaves imported to the United States arrived in Charleston. In 2018, the city formally apologized for its role in the American Slave trade after CNN noted that slavery "riddles the history" of Charleston.Known for its strong tourism industry, in 2016 Travel + Leisure Magazine ranked Charleston as the best city in the world.