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  • Sweetwater, Texas
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    Sweetwater,

    Texas

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    Sweetwater is a municipality in and the seat of Nolan County, Texas, United States. It is 236 miles southeast of Amarillo and 181 miles west of Fort Worth. Its population was 10,906 at the 2010 census.
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    Budget Travel Lists

    8 Best Day Trips From Nashville

    The cities and towns that are just an easy drive from Nashville (between a half-hour and three hours) are full of natural and historical wonders that are ripe for a quick adventure. Whether you find yourself sampling some Tennessee whiskey from a powerhouse distillery or exploring the mysterious depths of an underground sea, here are eight of our favorite day-trip destinations. All of these locations can be reached in three hours or less from Nashville via car. Just be sure to check their websites and/or call ahead of time for any weather-related closures. 1. Brush up on your Civil War history in Franklin Drive time: 22 miles south of Nashville; 30-minute drive What to do: Franklin has come a long way since its days as a Confederate stronghold and site of one of the Civil War’s bloodiest battles (The Battle of Franklin). Today, the small town manages to preserve its historic past while stepping into its new role as a welcoming, suburban city brimming with quaint, locally owned shops and lively eateries. Start off by exploring three of Franklin’s most important Civil War sites – the Carnton Plantation, the Lotz House and the Carter House – through a local tour operator or venture out on your own on a self-guided tour. Later, head to downtown Franklin’s charming Main Street for boutique shopping and delectable Southern eats at Gray’s on Mainbefore capping off the day with a bottle of honeysuckle wine at the nearby Arrington Vineyards. 2. Drink some Tennessee whiskey in Lynchburg Drive time: 75 miles south of Nashville; one-hour and 40-minute drive What to do: Jack Daniels is practically synonymous with Tennessee whiskey, making Lynchburg – the home of Jack Daniels Distillery – a veritable mecca for fans of this storied brown spirit. Interestingly, the distillery is located in a dry county, but you can still sample whiskey drawn from individual barrels during one of their informative distillery tours. The town of Lynchburg itself is also worth exploring. If wine is more your speed, pop into the Lynchburg Winery before indulging in a slice of rich Southern gastronomic history at Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House Restaurant. If souvenir shopping is on the list, the surrounding shops are stocked with a delightful assortment of handmade crafts. 3. Go whitewater kayaking at Rock Island State Park Drive time: 87 miles east of Nashville; one-hour and 40-minute drive What to do: Within Rock Island State Park’s 883 acres, you’ll find a day full of nature excursions that cater to both laid-back explorers and adrenaline junkies alike. The park is both majestically craggy and verdant, boasting a 30-foot horseshoe waterfall that once powered the 19th-century cotton textile mill located above it. You can opt to hike past this powerful water feature on one of nine trails located below the dam, or, if you’re experienced with a kayak, you can take to the rushing stream and paddle your way downstream. Fishing, swimming and birding are also popular options here, with osprey, belted kingfishers and great blue herons in the area. 4. Visit an underground national park in Cave City, Kentucky Drive time: 93 miles northeast of Nashville; one-hour and 30-minute drive What to do: With its underground rivers, glittering crystals, jagged stalagmites and rare wildlife, Mammoth Cave National Park provides shelter for some of the most unusual ecosystems in the world. But the 400-mile surveyed passageways also have their fair share of fascinating tales to tell – including the cave’s turn as a tuberculosis hospital and the prehistoric mummies that inhabited its depths. You can spend a day learning about this U.S. national park through cave tours and experiences that range from an hour-and-a-half to six hours. After you’ve peeked at the blind beetles and eyeless fish inside the cave complex, go topside for an afternoon of hiking, fishing and ziplining through 53,000 acres of lush forest. 5. Explore space travel and breweries in Huntsville, Alabama Drive time: 110 miles south of Nashville; one-hour and 53-minute drive What to do: Home to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsvilleis quite literally a town full of rocket scientists. As such, space-themed adventures are the order of the day, and there’s no better spot to explore the skies than at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. The Smithsonian-affiliated museum contains the world’s largest collection of space artifacts, including rocket and shuttle components. Both kids and adults alike will get a kick out of a walk-through replica of the International Space Station and the resident G-Force simulator. Huntsville has also come into its own as an arts and culture hub. Case in point: Lowe Mill Arts & Entertainment, the nation’s largest privately owned arts facility. Inside this former cotton mill, you can watch artists at work from over 148 studios, dip into one of the six galleries or watch a performance in the facility’s theater. After an afternoon of the arts, wind down with a beer inside one of Huntsville’s many up-and-coming breweries, like the Salty Nut Brewery, Yellowhammer Brewing and Straight to Ale. Certain areas around town are designated open container, making it easy to continue exploring Huntsville with a to-go cup in hand. 6. Ride the rail up to Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga Drive time: 134 miles southeast of Nashville; two-hour and 10-minute drive What to do: Six miles from downtown Chattanooga lies a nature-based triple threat: Ruby Falls, Rock City and the Inline Railway. It’s an all-day, all-ages adventure based in Lookout Mountain, a mountain ridge running through Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. Start with a guided cave tour or a 700-foot zipline adventure through Ruby Falls, home of the world’s largest underground waterfall, before strolling through the diverse flora and fauna of the Rock City Gardens. Wrap up your day with a mile-high ride on the Incline Railway, one of the world’s steepest passenger railways. At the top: a bird’s eye from the Lookout Mountain observation deck. 7. Navigate the Lost Sea in Sweetwater Drive time: 170 miles east of Nashville; two-hour and 53-minute drive What to do: Tennessee may be land-locked, but that doesn’t stop the state from boasting its very own sea. Designated a registered natural landmark by the U.S. Department of Interior and listed as ‘America’s largest underground lake’ by Guinness World Book of Records, the Lost Sea is a massive body of water located in a historic cave system known as the Craighead Caverns. The true size of this body of water is unknown, but you can glide across its four-acre surface and catch a glimpse of the crystal formations and colossal rainbow trout that inhabit the caverns on one of the daily boat tours offered. Nearby, Sweetwater’s revitalized Main Street offers a bake shop full of indulgent Southern sweets, galleries and plenty of antique shopping. 8. Tour Elvis Presley’s stomping grounds in Memphis Drive time: 215 miles west of Nashville; three-hour drive What to do: Clocking in at just over 200 miles, the drive from Nashville to Memphis stretches the definition of a day trip, but if you’re a devotee of ‘The King’, you know that it’s all about taking care of business… in a flash. And there’s no other place that brings the legacy of Elvis to life quite like the kitschy and wonderfully bizarre Graceland. The full Elvis Experience tour takes about three hours, which still leaves you time to fill up on some that transcendent low-and-slow Memphis pulled pork at Central BBQ before heading back to Music City. Get more travel inspiration, tips and exclusive offers sent straight to your inbox with Lonely Planet’s weekly newsletter.

    Road Trips

    6 U.S. Scenic Byways You Must Discover

    Daydreaming of a road trip? The Federal Highway Administration has done all your homework for you. Though anyone who’s ever crept along in 5 miles-per-hour traffic may have a hard time admitting it, the United States has magnificent highway infrastructure, and when it comes to road trips, no element of that blacktop web is greater than the America’s Byways collection. To earn a place on this treasure map of 150 routes, the road must show "outstanding archaeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational, and scenic value," according to the FHA, part of the U.S. Department of Transportation. When taken as a whole, the Byways are truly the beating pulse of our country's artery system. You could spend years exploring them, but if you’ve only got a couple weeks, here are six unforgettable routes. 1. ROUTE 66: THE MOTHER ROAD The most famous of the Scenic Byways also is one of the longest, and depending where you grew up, you’ll instantly think of certain stops as “the main stretch of Route 66.” For West Coasters, it’s the Santa Monica endpoint and dust-red Arizona towns, but over in the Midwest, Illinois has its own Route 66 Heritage Project to preserve the beginning of this iconic American road. After departing Chicago's metropolitan area, it’s all cornfields, small towns, and roadside attractions until you get to Springfield, the Land of Lincoln and gateway to serious Americana antiquing. SEE: It’s said that ghosts haunt Joliet, a city 30 miles southwest of Chicago. If you’re hoping to spot ghosts, check out Rialto Square Theater and Joliet Prison. Pontiac-Oakland Museum is a haven of American car memorabilia. And since you’ll be passing through Springfield, make time for the Lincoln Home historic site. EAT: Not much has changed on the menu at Springfield's Chili Parlor (thechiliparloronline.com) since it opened in 1945. You can even get a glass of buttermilk to drink at this Food Network favorite. 2. TURQUOISE TRAIL, NEW MEXICO Many of the Scenic Byways have wonderfully expressive names. Case in point: this stretch of highway connecting Santa Fe with Albuquerque. The Turquoise Trail (turquoisetrail.org) is largely surrounded by golden and red earth, although on a normal sunny, arid day, the sky will indeed be turquoise as you pass by ranches, former mining towns, and historic sites. SEE: Quirky roadside attraction Tinkertown Museum (tinkertown.com) in Sandia Park, about 50 miles south of Santa Fe, is a treasure trove of antique toys. The canyon-set mining town-turned-art-colony Madrid, about 20 miles further north en route to Santa Fe, offers galleries and restaurants, and at Casa Grande Trading Post you can stock up on souvenir turquoise. EAT: Jezebel Soda Fountain in Madrid is known for bakery pies, chocolate-dipped ice cream cones, American diner food, and kitsch décor with a 1920s wink. 3. LARIAT LOOP, COLORADO (Jordan Blakesley) Colorado has 11 America’s Byways, and it’s hard to say that one is better than the rest, but for a truly broad range of culture touchstones in a relatively short stretch of roadway, Lariat Loop (lariatloop.org), a 40-mile circle that starts and ends in Golden, stands out. It’s been a Denver-area day drive since the 1920s, when one can only imagine people taking their Ford Model A's up Lookout Mountain. A generation before that, trains were the main mode of transportation, and Buffalo Bill Cody was a household name. And several millennia before, dinosaurs proliferated and left their indelible tracks throughout the mountain passages. SEE: Before—or after—the drive, take advantage of the riches Golden offers, like a historic walking tour, Golden Gate Canyon State Park, and the many beer gardens. Speaking of beer, the town is home to Coors Brewing (serving the malt-brewed golden taste of America since 1873!), where free tours are offered Thursdays through Monday. Other stops along the loop include Dinosaur Ridge, the Colorado Railroad Museum, and Buffalo Bill Museum and Gravesite. EAT: The Fort (thefort.com) in Red Rocks territory is known for its game meats and “New Foods of the Old West” 19th-century recipes updates. 4. A JOURNEY THROUGH TIME SCENIC BYWAY, UTAH Where other designated byways take you back a few centuries, the epically named 286-mile Utah stretch takes you back to when mammoths roamed the earth. If that sounds dramatic, just wait until you’re at nearly 9000 feet, the red rocks and sub-alpine fir forests arrayed far below. National parks Capitol Reef and Bryce Canyon, state parks including Kodachrome Basin, and four-wheel destinations like Hole-in-the-Rock are all detours along this all-American road that can take five hours, four days, or a lifetime to traverse. SEE: Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument is a must-see for geology enthusiasts. Anasazi State Park Museum is a history lesson in Native American lore. Long-distance hikers should make stops at Hell’s Backbone and The Box, but you only need to be human to appreciate Dixie National Forest and the arches of Red Canyon. Also, if you love cowboy culture, try to meet up with the Bryce Canyon Rodeo. EAT: The seasonal Sweetwater Kitchen (sweetwaterkitchen.com) in Boulder Mountain Guest Ranch features about 95% organic ingredients on its tightly edited locavore menu. The mouthwatering dishes are a great way to refuel after a day hiking around Hell’s Backbone. 5. BEACH BOULEVARD SCENIC BYWAY, MISSISSIPPI (Ken Murphy) With a name like Beach Boulevard (gulfcoast.org), you’d think this route maps a West Coast drive, but in a plot twist, we’re actually heading to the Gulf Coast. Yes, the Southeast has its own beach Byway that traverses several states—and yes, Mississippi lays claim to the most beautiful part. Start out in Waveland, visit historic coastal towns, wend your way along 26 miles of beachfront, check out stately homes, and eat fresh seafood galore. If you want a bustling city, check out the casinos in Biloxi. SEE: Mississippi Sound views from Pass Christian (aka “the Pass”) cannot be beat. Gulf Islands Water Park is a top pick for families, and be sure to check out the classic Main Street of artist enclave Ocean Springs—named one of our 10 Coolest Small Towns in America 2018. EAT: There’s a lot of good gumbo, fresh fish, and more along this route. Start the AM drive at PJ’s Coffee in Pearlington located on the “The Pearlington Scenic Byway to Space,” just west of where Highway 90 becomes Beach Boulevard. Work up an appetite as you drive east and dive into lunch at Claw Daddy’s, White Cap Seafood, or Half Shell Oyster House in Gulfport. 6. OLD CANADA ROAD If you’ve never driven through rugged, forested, river-crisscrossed upper New England, this journey will be a wonderful deep-dive. Bucolic photo ops abound: a clapboard cabin, a glimmering lake, a large woodland creature. And in fall, this route offers the caliber of fall foliage that turns people into lifetime leaf-peepers. The endpoint of this 78-mile historic byway is, as promised, a border crossing to our northern neighbor and Acadian delights. SEE: If it's summertime, before you follow the south-to-north route, check Lakewood Theater's schedule of musicals. The venue, situated at the southernmost point of the road, is an outdoor culture paradise. It's even worth overnighting here. In the morning, as you head north, pull over for a panorama photo moment at Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook, just below Wyman Lake. The lake is a delightful site for a picnic if the weather allows. Up the road past Caratunk, veer off the byway at The Forks to the stunning drop of Moxie Fall. Retrace a few grueling steps of the historic Kennebec River to the Dead River route that the infamous Benedict Arnold took during his brief moment as a war hero. And as you motor along, note that this route overlaps with the Appalachian Trail, so be on the lookout for people hiking the perilous pilgrimage of a lifetime just off the highway. EAT: If the weather’s warm enough to enjoy the scenery, opt for a lakeside picnic over a restaurant. Buy picnic supplies at Williams’ General Store. When the Northeast's chill hits, join the rowdy crowd at the Marshall Inn, about 80 miles north of Augusta, for food, drinks, and live entertainment.

    Inspiration

    Hotel We Love: Blockade Runner Beach Resort, Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Not 20 minutes from downtown Wilmington, North Carolina, on the barrier island of Wrightsville Beach sits the Blockade Runner Beach Resort, a family-owned property centrally located on a pristine oceanfront plot. The boutique hotel has been around since the mid-60s, but it’s received a contemporary facelift over the years, now boasting stylish accommodations, beautifully manicured gardens, and an unsullied stretch of white sand, where beach meets gentle ocean waves. THE STORY The Blockade Runner’s history begins some 120 years ago, when the Colonial-style Seashore Hotel, located at the same site, opened to the public in 1897. As with many buildings in the Wilmington area during this time period, it didn’t last long, falling victim to a fire in 1918. In 1922, the Ocean Terrace Hotel took its place, but it wasn’t long for this world either, hit hard by a hurricane in 1954 and burning down entirely the following year. In 1964, the current iteration opened, and you can see still elements of the original midcentury style in the blonde-wood ballroom, once the main dining room. Today, the resort is collectively owned by four siblings, two of whom have managed the property since 1984. THE QUARTERS Each floor of the Blockade Runner has a unique style—my third-floor oceanfront room featured two queen-size sleigh beds with pink accents, a set of white chairs cozily arranged in front of sliding-glass doors for optimal sunrise-watching or coffee-drinking, and a gold wall treatment reminiscent of glam fish scales—but its 147 rooms and three suites all come equipped with a king or two queen beds, flat-screen TVs, Keurig coffee makers, mini fridges, free WiFi, and plush terry robes. Harborfront rooms are the least expensive; they overlook the Intracoastal Waterway’s boat slips and offer great sunset views, but in the process, they also face the parking lot. Oceanfront rooms come with or without a balcony and cost a little more, and suites are at the top end, thanks to roomy digs, soaking tubs with ocean views, and loungy balconies with gas fireplaces. Also available: A two-story cottage (formerly a boarding house), adjacent to the hotel, that sleeps up to 26 people, with 13 bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a fully equipped kitchen, and a dining room that seats 20. THE NEIGHBORHOOD The beach is the neighborhood. Blockade Runner is a classic resort and it lives up to its billing, with enough attractions to keep guests on the property and happy about it, but it’s also centrally located on the island, just a brief walk from beach-town style bars, restaurants, and shops and a short drive over the causeway from Wilmington proper. No visit to the shore is complete without a stop at beachwear chain Wings, where you’ll find every conceivable accessory you’d want (and quite a few that you wouldn’t), and you’ll pass one on your way to the hotel, just as you exit the bridge. After you’ve had your fill of cheap t-shirts and toys, head around the corner to Hallelu, a cute boutique peddling bohemian, beachy clothes and inexpensive jewelry, or stroll a little further down Lumina Avenue to Sweetwater Surf Shop, where you’ll find a collection of cheeky Ts, bikinis, and boards, and Wrightsville Beach Art Company, the only gallery on the island, for nautical pieces made from recycled materials. THE FOOD On the property, East Oceanfront Dining serves coastal cuisine for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, either in the sleek dining room or outside on the canopied garden patio, and there’s a poolside bar that opens in late March for cocktails and seafood-forward fare. (Breakfast is only included with certain packages, and if yours isn’t one of them, the a la carte menu is a more appealing option than the buffet.) Within walking distance, try the Trolly Stop for hot dogs (varieties include all-beef, smoked pork, and vegetarian) or the deli counter at Roberts Market for juicy, piping-hot fried chicken—but only before 3 p.m., when both local faves stop serving (on offseason weekdays, at least). The Workshop, tucked into a small space behind Wings, offers espresso drinks and premade sandwiches with a side of shark-teeth jewelry; further down Lumina, 22 North has a killer fried-alligator special that’s lovely with a glass of white wine. On Harbor Island, between Wrightsville and the mainland, try Poe’s Tavern for burgers; across the Intracoastal, grab a seat on the deck at the Fish House Grill for iced tea and fish tacos (expect a wait on sunny afternoons), or make a reservation at the Bridge Tender for a more upscale waterfront experience. And over the causeway, just a few minutes from Blockade Runner by car (my Lyft ride cost all of $4), is Ceviche’s, a Panamanian restaurant with strong tropical beverages and a menu that ranges from traditional plates like ropa vieja and arroz con pollo to the namesake selection of ceviches. Scoop up the corvina, sea bass classically prepared with lime, cilantro, and red onion, and the langoustine, marinated in citrus and coconut milk, with plantain chips and tostones, and wash it all down with a fresh-lime margarita (only $6 on Mondays!). ALL THE REST Blockade Runner’s ocean-facing gardens are beautifully manicured, with a pool and hot tub that open in the spring. Guests can take classes at an ASA-certified sailing school (good for beginners or intermediates) or charter a boat for an evening sail; rent a kayak and explore the sound, either on your own or with a guided tour of the salt marsh; or lounge by the pool or the ocean and let an attendant keep you in fruity umbrella drinks. In low season, you can get a great deal on accommodations, and though you might not spend much time lying on the beach, the area makes a good mid-winter escape, with average temperatures hovering around the 60s from December to February. The rates more than double during the summer, though, so if you’re looking for a peak-summer bargain, this probably isn’t it. Also, as is common with some beach locations, the tap water is sulfuric, so if you’re sensitive to that smell or taste, be sure to bring filtered water with you. RATES & DEETS Starting at $125. Blockade Runner Beach Resort275 Waynick BoulevardWrightsville Beach, NC910.256.2251blockade-runner.com

    Inspiration

    Best Things to Do in Santa Fe, NM

    As a New Yorker with a craving for wide-open spaces, I've always been intrigued by the American Southwest, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, remotely located in the foothills of the southern Rockies, with low adobe buildings, chile-laden cuisine, and 300 days of sunshine a year, has been on my to-visit list for ages. I'm happy to report that it doesn't disappoint: With ties to everyone from Georgia O'Keeffe to George R.R. Martin, the second-oldest city in the country offers a sense of place like no other. From museums, galleries, and interactive art spaces to decadent spas, great food, and free-flowing margaritas, here are seven ways to enjoy the City Different. 1. GET ACCLIMATED Lodging at Ten Thousand Waves. (Courtesy Laurie Allegretti/Ten Thousand Waves) At 7,000 feet above sea level, Santa Fe is the highest capital in the country, and those heights demand respect. Altitude sickness can feel like the morning after a rough night out, and much like beating that hangover, hydration is key. Luckily, we were headed for the refreshing waters of Ten Thousand Waves, a spa inspired by the mountain hot-spring resorts of Japan, incongruously perched in the serene, wooded hills of New Mexico. The hot tubs and cold plunge pools are the thing here: They have hot tub suites with private outdoor bathing, saunas, and private changing rooms open to the public by reservation. Book online here.There’s also a full menu of services, and it’s a doozy. Access to the baths is included with any treatment that’s 50 minutes or longer, but you can also opt for an extra dose of relaxation with add-ons like the Yasuragi Head & Neck Treatment, a soothing, gentle massage that unlocks tension in the head, neck, and face. Other than a bit of trouble sleeping, I didn’t feel the altitude much after that first day, and I’d swear that submerging myself in various bodies of water upon arrival had something to do with it. (To be fair, I also made sure to drink the requisite amounts of water—an extra liter to a liter and a half, according to the Institute for Altitude Medicine—and that probably didn’t hurt.) Long story short: Don’t forget your swimsuit. 2. GET YOUR BEARINGS Adobe on the Plaza. (Courtesy Tourism Santa Fe) Before you run off to explore, put your new location into the appropriate context. Start in the historic downtown area: Long before it was a Jazz Age and Depression-era stop on Route 66, the Santa Fe Plaza was the endpoint of the Santa Fe Trail, a commercial corridor that connected the city with Missouri until arrival of the railroad in 1880. And now, at the heart of the city, a tree-lined, well-manicured square sits where alfalfa was once grown to feed pack animals. For a closer look at the Plaza and landmarks like the Palace of the Governors and the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, schedule a walking tour to see hallmarks of the city’s signature Santa Fe style, which combines the flat roofs, rounded exterior beams, adobe brick, and portals of Spanish-Pueblo Revival architecture with elements of Territorial Revival style for an utterly distinct look. All that learning will probably make you peckish, so treat yourself to a different kind of history at the Five & Dime General Store, right on the square. At the back of the store, past the walls of cheesy postcards and and alien-themed paraphernalia, a local delicacy awaits: Frito chili pie, chips topped with a scoop of homemade chili and grated cheddar and served right there in the bag. 3. EXPLORE MILES OF MUSEUMS Multiple Visions: A Common Bond, at the Museum of International Folk Art. (Courtesy Michel Monteaux/Museum of International Folk Art) Given its designation as a UNESCO Creative City for Crafts and Folk Art, with 14 major museums, 250-plus galleries, and more professional artists per capita than any other city in America, it’d be shocking if Santa Fe didn’t have a vibrant arts scene. From classic institutions to quirky independent galleries to immersive, interactive spaces, New Mexico’s capital more than earns its reputation as a hotbed of creativity. It’s next to impossible to see everything in a weekend, but aim to hit one area at a time and you'll make a decent go of it. A short drive outside of town is Museum Hill, a red-rock plateau stunningly situated under picture-perfect blue skies. It’s home to four museums, but I only had time for two: the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture($9), dedicated to the achievements of the Native peoples of the southwest from pre-history to contemporary times; and the International Folk Art Museum ($12), where the star attraction is a rotating display of dolls, puppets, and figurines of all kinds. With more than 10,000 objects, selected from a collection ten times that size and arranged in a series of vignettes reenacting daily life in miniature, the sheer volume—not to mention the mind-boggling attention to detail—is astounding. After getting a peek at more traditional Native American arts and culture, I was curious to see what today’s artists were up to, and back downtown, in a small adobe space just off the Plaza, I found a refreshingly au courant collection. With a tight roster of often-changing exhibitions (current offerings include examinations of art and activism and Alaska Native films), the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts ($10) showcases the boundary-pushing work of progressive, modern artists—and it’s easily managed in an hour or so, to boot. From there, it’s not even a ten minute walk to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum ($20). (On your way over, be sure to ogle the eye candy at Shiprock Santa Fe, a repository of highly covetable jewelry, pottery, Native textiles, furniture, and fine art.) True to its name, the museum shines a spotlight on the American icon, a New Mexico resident for the last 30-some years of her life. Yes, the cattle skulls and the vibrant southwestern landscapes are here, but I was particularly drawn to a a display called “The Wideness and Wonder of the World,” where a potentially mundane detail caught my eye: the boxes O’Keeffe used to organize the detritus of travel, collected from the various international trips she undertook in her ‘70s. I hadn’t realized she was a fellow itinerant, and something about the revelation just grabbed me. (Well, that and her handwritten tags...be still my label-loving heart.) 4. ART ON THE MOVE Sculptures on Canyon Road. (Courtesy Tourism Santa Fe) You don’t have to go to a museum to get your fill of artistic endeavors—a leisurely stroll down Canyon Road will stimulate your creativity and get your feet going at the same time. As you pop in and out of the galleries, keep an eye out for something special: the larger-than-life bronze statues by Allan Houser, in the Zaplin Lampert Gallery sculpture garden; a very cool stainless steel figure that disappears and reappears as you walk by, created by German physicist-turned-sculptor Julian Voss-Andreae; or maybe a flock of large-scale origami cranes, winged horses, and clever renditions of Rock Paper Scissors by paper artist Kevin Box, who transforms folds of paper into something much more permanent. Box’s sculptures are featured at the Selby Fleetwood Gallery (as of July 2021 this gallery has closed), a treasure trove of distinctive, stylistically diverse artwork from the likes of Joan Barber, Helen Steele, and Stacy Phililps. For beautiful bits of Native American handicrafts, from pottery, furniture, and baskets to beadwork, jewelry, and Katsina dolls, look no further than Morning Star Gallery, where there’s plenty to discover for experienced collectors and beginners alike. Fashion mavens will find a kindred spirit at Nathalie, a tiny boutique overflowing with vintage cowboy boots, retro Western shirts, silver belt buckles, and wide-brimmed hats—pretty much anything a city slicker might need for a proper makeover. When you’ve had your fill of shopping, stop for refreshments at Kakawa Chocolate House, where the homemade truffles, ice cream, and drinking elixirs will put the spring back in your step. Meanwhile across town, SITE Santa Fe is a contemporary art space at the Railyard with even more galleries and shops, plus a ceramics workshop, a performance center, a sports bar, and a movie theater with 25 beers on tap and an old train car in the lobby. There are worse ways to spend a Saturday morning than browsing the galleries, then hitting the city’s justifiably renowned farmers market, a fixture in its own right—even in the offseason, vendors bundle up to hawk herbs and spices, baked goods, and plenty of produce. As the sun pours down and musicians stake their claim around the perimeter (and inside where it’s warm), chiles are roasted, ristras are arranged, and the people are here for it. 5. EXPERIENCE SOMETHING SURREAL Meow Wolf's House of Eternal Return. (Courtesy Lindsey Kennedy/Meow Wolf) This one’s art too, but it’s so spectacular it deserves its own category. An immersive experience from local art collective Meow Wolf, the House of Eternal Return ($40 adults) is a choose-your-own-adventure, sci-fi-style head-trip—and it’s one that counts Santa Fean George R.R. Martin as both patron and landlord. The Game of Thrones author bought the site four years ago, renovating the building to the tune of $2.7 million and leasing it to the collective; the Meow Wolf Art Complex now includes a performance space, a learning center, and a bar, but the main attraction is its first permanent exhibition. In very X-Files fashion, the House of Eternal Return tells the story of a family that vanished after conducting a forbidden experiment that dissolved the nature of time and space (...yup!), and as a guest, you get to wander through their abandoned psychedelic Victorian funhouse searching for clues. A draw for all ages (toddlers and senior citizens and everyone in between on the day I visited), the 22,000-square-foot space is riddled with so many twists and turns—cave systems and tree houses, portals and hidden passageways, mirrors, optical illusions, and fairy lights galore—you could spend hours inside and barely scratch the surface. 6. EAT YOUR HEART OUT Santa Fe School of Cooking. (Courtesy Tourism Santa Fe) Food is culture, and getting to know the native cuisine is just as important as getting a handle on your surroundings. At the beginning of my trip, I spent a few hours at the Santa Fe School of Cooking and absolutely loved it—after a crash course in local food traditions, I came away properly prepared to tackle New Mexico and its various chiles. (The green version is made with fresh chile and has a piquant brightness, while the red is made with dried and therefore tastes a bit earthier; Christmas chile, my personal choice, is half and half.) During my tamale-making class, we sipped local wine, beer, and soda as our funny, approachable instructor provided a brief overview of the region’s culinary history and demonstrated how to handle some signature ingredients, and then we got to work, soaking corn husks, layering in the masa and various fillings, and preparing the little bundles for steaming. It was a hands-on experience that would make me appreciate the rest of my meals even more...and there were some pretty amazing meals to be had. For a high-end introduction to classic Santa Fe food, the stellar breakfast at La Plazuela, the restaurant at La Fonda Santa Fe sets a high bar. Commandeer a table in the light-filled, wood-beamed atrium and order the huevos rancheros, pan-fried trout (add chile for an extra kick), and fruit-topped blue-corn pancakes. A few blocks over, Tia Sophia’s offers a more down-to-earth take: The local institution has been serving belly-busting meals to the masses since 1975, and it’s also the place where the terms breakfast burrito and Christmas chile were coined. Stop by on a Saturday morning for a bowl of green-chile stew or the homemade-chorizo burrito, but go early to avoid the crowds. If matcha smoothie bowls and gluten-free buckwheat pancakes are more your speed, put Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen at the top of your list. With a focus on responsibly sourced seasonal ingredients, the internationally tinged menu has something for eaters of all stripes—vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, paleo, and carnivorous alike. Pass through on your way to Meow Wolf and fuel up for the fun. Watch the skateboarders in action at De Vargas Park, then grab a seat on the sunny patio at Cowgirl BBQfor margaritas and snacks (the cabeza de ajo, a whole head of roasted garlic in a pool of melted cheese, was a hit with my table), or more filling fare like chiles rellenos, smoked chicken, and an award-winning green-chile cheeseburger. Walk it all off with a stroll around the nearby Double Take, a 25,000-square-foot consignment shop with room upon room of cowboy boots and Western wear, turquoise jewelry and Native American blankets, and vintage memorabilia, collectibles, and fine art. If gallery-hopping on Canyon Road has you feeling fancy, take a break and duck into The Compound for lunch inside a fabulous Alexander Girard–designed adobe building. Here you’ll find reasonably priced, white-tablecloth fare from Mark Kiffin, the only James Beard Award–winning chef in town: deceptively light and crispy onion rings, crab-and-lobster salad (a favorite with the ladies-who-lunch crowd), a decadent chicken schnitzel, and a house-cured pastrami sandwich that measures up to some of the best New York delis have to offer. For dinner, try to score one of the 12 seats at the sunken bar in the front of the restaurant—they’re extremely popular, so you’ll need a reservation. (Call a week in advance to be on the safe side.) Be sure to save room for dessert: Pastry chef Rebecca Freeman’s creations are not to be missed. Every itinerary needs at least one blow-out meal, and Santa Fe provides plenty of opportunities to splurge. In the dining room at Sazón, portraits of Frida Kahlo watch over tables of guests thrilling to chef Fernando Olea’s contemporary spin on traditional Mexican cuisine. He’s a master of moles, so taste as many as you can—my favorite matched the coloradito with perfectly cooked duck breast—and prepare to be surprised. A simple-sounding shrimp consomme turned out to have a complex, multi-level flavor profile, and the chef’s signature blue-crab soup was a foam-topped revelation. For dessert, order the dulce sinfonía—your waiter will refuse to tell you exactly what's in it, which only makes it better. Outside of town, in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Terra at Four Seasons Rancho Encantado serves a global menu that simultaneously reflects the chef’s experiences in far-flung locations like Tanzania and the West Indies and nods to local Southwestern traditions. Sip a glass of wine in the high-ceilinged, modern dining room while a fire roars in the fireplace, and congratulate yourself on making good life choices. 7. HOP ON THE MARGARITA TRAIL In a genius marketing move, the city’s tourism office launched its Margarita Trail program in 2016, and it’s been a boon to agave lovers ever since. Download the app ($3) or buy a paper passport ($3), flash it at 45 participating bars and restaurants to get $1 off the designated drink, and don’t forget to ask for a stamp with each one to earn some prizes. (Banish those visions of pub crawls past: You can only receive two stamps a day.) The watermelon-cucumber concoction at Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi is a must-order; pair it with excellent green-chile- and braised-bacon-topped buffalo sliders or groaning plates of nachos with the works. For a classic rendition of the cocktail, plus crowd-pleasers like guac and queso, chips and salsa, grilled-shrimp skewers, cheesy enchiladas, and ground-beef tacos, follow the Santa Feans' lead and turn to The Shed, which was packed to the brim with happy customers on a recent Friday night. (Not so happy: the people who were quoted an hour-long wait time. Make a reservation if you don't want to take your chances at the first-come, first-served bar.) If it's a clear night, swing by Julia's Social Club at La Posada de Santa Fe for an al fresco outing. Stop at the hotel’s front desk on your way in and schedule a massage to take care of tomorrow’s three-margarita headache, then snag a table outside and hunker down around a fire pit for drinks and Mediterranean snacks. Up for a nightcap? Evangelo’s Cocktail Lounge is dive-bar heaven: a cash-only corner joint with live music, a local character pouring the drinks (don’t even think about asking for a Budweiser), and a great backstory. Bring a little extra change for the cover charge, and some for a t-shirt too. If you’d rather participate than watch the show, venture out past the Railyard to Tiny’s for the best Saturday-night karaoke in town. Take a seat at the bar and pick a song from the hefty binder as fast as you can (you’ll be waiting awhile, so get your name in right away), then take to the stage and bask in the warm approval of an enthusiastic, generous room. THE FINE PRINT With 5,600-some hotel rooms in Santa Fe as a whole and 1,900 or so downtown, there are plenty of accommodations to choose from—rooms are often available for less than $200 from late fall to spring (minus the winter holidays). Independent and boutique properties in the historic city center tend to be pricier than the chain hotels on Cerrillos Road, but if you’re in search of a bargain, you’ll find the lowest average daily rates in January, February, and March. I loved the Hotel Santa Fe, the only majority Native American–owned hotel in the downtown area. Many of the city’s arts institutions offer discounted or free entry to New Mexico residents as well as seniors and children. If you have a few state museums or historic sites on your list, it might be worth looking into the New Mexico CulturePass, which grants access to 15 locations for $30. Given the altitude, two items are absolutely essential to making your visit an enjoyable one: a reusable water bottle and a serious moisturizer. Be sure to pack both.

    Road Trips

    Driving Mendocino County

    What you'll find in this story: California travel, Mendocino culture, Mendocino County attractions, Mendocino County lodging, Boonville San Francisco travel As most people who live in San Francisco will tell you, there are an infinite number of things to love about the city. What they might not say is that one of the reasons they love it so has nothing to do with the city proper. It's the easy proximity to the stunning terrain to the north. Not Marin County--which is nice but no surprise--but Mendocino County, where in a matter of hours you can be zooming back and forth between the dramatic coastline and rolling inland hills. Day one: San Francisco to Boonville The first tunnel I come to after crossing over the Golden Gate Bridge, five minutes into Marin, is framed with a rainbow painting, nicely reflecting the region's laid-back, eco-friendly leanings. I breathe a little deeper, relaxing to the scent of wildflowers and sage that seeps in through the car windows. In Calistoga, famous for its mineral water and mud-bath spas, I pick up a friend, and we head west on Highway 128. In true Sunday fashion, the drive is glorious. It's sunny, the hills are deep green, and the curves in the road are just sharp enough to keep me engaged but still allow for satisfying speed. Our first stop is blink-and-you've-missed-it Jimtown. The Jimtown Store, with its vintage Ford ornamentally parked out front, is an endearing pit stop both for road-trippers like us and spandex-clad bicyclists hydrating with fresh lemonade on the benches out front. A tiny counter doubles as a gourmet deli and wine bar, and a tastefully eclectic array of objets de kitsch, craft, and nostalgia are scattered around for sale. Healdsburg, not far west, is far more developed--wineries with boutique-like storefronts, upscale clothing stores, and a tree-shaded town square that's often the site of alfresco art fairs. We have a lunch of fancy sandwiches and strawberry aguas frescas at the Oakville Grocery. Once home to apple orchards, the area is equally suited to grape growing, and the linear rows of vines appear with greater frequency the deeper we venture into Anderson Valley. It doesn't take long to reach Boonville, our first overnight stop. In fact, we arrive so soon that we haven't quite gotten our fill yet, so we forge ahead a few miles to Philo (population 400) for a bit of wine tasting. In contrast to the larger, corporate-owned Napa vint-ners, the wine business here is in the hands of families and individual owners, and we're pleasantly surprised when the proprietors don't charge us. We begin with reds at Brutocao Cellars, and then at Navarro Vineyards--highly recommended by a sommelier-wannabe friend--we expand to include whites. The pourer is approachable and knowledgeable, and the patio has a fantastic view of the flourishing vines. I'm so impressed that I buy three bottles. Outside the entrance to Hendy Woods State Park, we encounter a cluster of buildings called the Apple Farm. There's a stand selling ice-cold organic apple juice, three rustically chic cottages (they rent for a little more than we want to spend), and a cooking school headed by Don and Sally Schmitt, the former owners of the famous French Laundry restaurant in Yountville (which they sold to Thomas Keller in 1994). The Boonville Hotel, run by the Schmitts' son Johnny, is a tasteful update of an old roadhouse. The fresh touches in the room include geometric-print bedspreads, designer mint-green walls, and aromatic lavender in a vase on the side table. After a few glasses of wine in the flower garden, we're happy to discover that the hotel has a well-regarded restaurant on the ground floor. We're less happy that the three-course prix fixe and a glass of wine cost almost as much as the weekday rate for one of the rooms. But we enjoy our dinner just the same, and the quiet of the evening allows for a night of uninterrupted sleep. Day one Lodging Boonville Hotel14050 Hwy. 128, Boonville, 707/895-2210, boonvillehotel.com, from $100 Food Jimtown Store6706 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg, 707/433-1212, lunch $10 Oakville Grocery124 Matheson St., Healdsburg, 707/433-3200, lunch $15 Attractions Brutocao Cellars & Vineyards7000 Hwy. 128, Philo, 707/895-2152 Navarro Vineyards5601 Hwy. 128, Philo, 800/537-9463 The Apple Farm18501 Philo-Greenwood Rd., Philo, 707/895-2333, cottages from $200 Day two: Boonville to Mendocino The road toward the Mendocino coast winds through the lush forest of Navarro River Redwoods State Park, where the air develops a chill. As in San Francisco, the climate is generally cool but punctuated with rare crystal-clear days that are close to perfection. (I'd find it significantly more refreshing if I weren't wearing flip-flops.) Our first sight of the Pacific Coast is when it's blanketed in atmospheric fog. What we can see: steep, craggy cliffs, crashing waves, and Victorian buildings with shingles hung out offering respite from the bracing outdoors. Here, B&Bs have their own official highway markers--with a little icon of a house--to help travelers find their way. We drive past entrances to numerous state parks and beaches, misty views lending a bit of drama. Twenty minutes past the turnoff to Mendocino--we'll come back to that later--is Fort Bragg, a working-class coastal town with a remarkable array of musty shops selling 20th-century bric-a-brac. This is also the place to board the Skunk Train, a logging railroad turned into a tourist attraction. On the main drag, we stop at a hole-in-the-wall called Eggheads. Omelets, appropriately, are the highlight of the menu; less appropriately, the room is done in an elaborate Wizard of Oz theme. Still, I can't resist ordering the Wicked Witch Burger, which lives up to its name in spiciness. Having been sequestered in the car long enough, we switch to exploring on foot. Our first stop is Glass Beach, a former city dump, where broken bottles have been worn down by the sea into glistening, colorful, translucent pebbles. We hike a few short trails at MacKerricher State Park, three miles north of town, then return to Mendocino.  Mendocino is a quaint mass of old Victorian-style buildings perched on a cliff. We arrive just as the sun is setting, and the early evening streets bustle with visitors of all ages and styles. At MacCallum House, a stately hotel, it's possible to people-watch in the bar/café while having a dinner of tasty appetizers. We're staying at the Sweetwater Inn & Spa. Rooms at the inn and the spa include use of a communal hot tub, which we learn is clothing optional. After spending an hour or two in this New Agey town, frankly, I'm not surprised. We upgrade to a private tub. By 10 p.m., the streets are deserted. I sleep like a baby--that is, until I'm awakened in the middle of the night by the exotic beat of bongo drums thumping in the distance. Day two Lodging Sweetwater Inn & Spa 44860 Main St., Mendocino, 800/882-7029, mendocinoinn.com, from $85, private tubs at the spa, $15.50 per hour per person Food Eggheads Restaurant326 N. Main St., Fort Bragg, 707/964-5005, lunch $10 MacCallum House Inn & Restaurant45020 Albion St., Mendocino, 800/609-0492, maccallumhouse.com, dinner $20 Attractions Navarro River Redwoods State ParkHwy. 128, two miles east of Hwy. 1, 707/937-5804 Skunk TrainFoot of Laurel St., Fort Bragg, 800/866-1690, skunktrain.com, tickets from $35, kids $20 Glass BeachElm St. at Old Haul Rd., Fort Bragg MacKerricher State ParkHwy. 1, north of Fort Bragg in Cleone, 707/964-9112 We grab sandwiches at the Little River Market (which, for some reason, is attached to the post office) and take them to one of the tables in the back, where there is a splendid ocean view. A couple of minutes south is Van Damme State Park's Pygmy Forest, a romantic name for a natural aberration. Here,  cypress, pine, and other trees only grow to a stunted height, due to the mineral-challenged soil. It's a bizarre, understated spectacle. Trees that look like they should be towering above us are just my height. Next stop, Gualala--pronounced "wah-la-la," FYI--and the St. Orres hotel, where we're staying. It's difficult to miss, as the building looks like some kind of Russian Orthodox fantasy, all cedar and stained glass. Deer and wild turkeys peacefully graze on the hillside nearby. The main structure has eight rooms and a restaurant, but we're issued a spacious and secluded cabin a few hundred feet up the road. Tuckered out from canoeing, we stick close to home for dinner. The restaurant's menu, which we thumbed through in the cottage, suggests you can order hearty pastas and appetizers, but the actual experience is more formal--and pricey-- than we were bargaining for. So we make do by ordering an assortment of light appetizers--tiny morsels of baby abalone with seared scallops, a savory wild mushroom tart, garlic flan, and a salad. It's delicious and just about enough to tide us over for the night. Day three Lodging St. Orres36601 South Hwy. 1, Gualala, 707/884-3303, saintorres.com, rooms from $90, dinner $40 Food Little River Market7746 North Hwy. 1, Little River, 707/937-5133, lunch $6 Attractions Catch a Canoe & Bicycles, Too44850 Comptche-Ukiah Rd., Mendocino, 707/937-0273, canoe rental $20 per hour, two-hour minimum Van Damme State ParkPygmy Forest, three miles south of Mendocino, Hy. 1, 707/937-5804 Which is not to say we don't make a few more stops. The upscale Sea Ranch resort community has award-winning '60s modernist architecture by William Turnbull and others. The houses are clustered in private enclaves with no-trespassing signs, but there are public walks along the beach at the Sea Ranch Lodge. In Bodega Bay we veer inland, passing the locations for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and then the Christo and Jeanne-Claude Running Fence Historic Park, a tiny spot of green that commemorates the artists' 1976 art installation. (The 24.5-mile-long curtain of fabric wound its way from Cotati down to the sea.) As parks go, it's not much. But it drives home the point that this area is full of lovely surprises. Day four Sea Ranch Lodge60 Sea Walk Dr., 800/732-7262, searanchlodge.com Christo and Jeanne-Claude Running Fence Historic Park15000 Bodega Hwy., Bodega, 707/565-2041 Day oneSan Francisco to Boonville, 136 Miles  Follow Hwy. 101 north across the Golden Gate Bridge. At Santa Rosa , take the Guerneville/River Rd. exit. Turn right on Mark West Springs Rd., left on Petrified Forest Rd., and left on Hwy. 128. Jimtown is 18 miles up. Just past Geyserville, 128 meets back up with Hwy. 101. They separate again just before Cloverdale; stick with 128 north. Boonville is 26 miles past that break.Day twoBoonville to Mendocino, 39 Miles  Continue north on 128. Navarro River Redwoods State Park is two miles before the point where 128 meets Hwy. 1, at the coast. If you reach the water, you've gone too far. The town of Mendocino is 10 miles past the junction of Hwys. 128 and 1. To get to Fort Bragg, pass through Mendocino and keep driving north on Hwy. 1 for 10 miles. Backtrack on 1 to return to Mendocino for the night.Day threeMendocino to Gualala, 49 MilesVan Damme State Park is in the town of Little River, three miles south of Mendocino on Hwy. 1. Gualala is 46 miles farther south.Day fourGualala to San Francisco, 115 Miles  Jump back on Hwy. 1 to leave Gualala. At Bodega Bay, Hwy. 1 leads past Hitchcock's The Birds site. Continuing south 68 miles past Bodega Bay, the road drops you right back onto the Golden Gate Bridge and into San Francisco.

    Inspiration

    Charleston: A Walking—and Eating!—Tour

    Come hungry. Charleston, S.C., is a town that likes to eat well. The downtown has a variety of options—Mexican, sushi, Korean, Mediterranean, Thai, Italian, delis, burgers—and range from pizza joints catering to the student crowd to fine dining. But when I'm in Charleston, I like to explore local twists on standards of South Carolina Low Country cuisine. Like fried green tomatoes. At Jestine's Kitchen, a casual eatery reproducing the recipes of Jestine Matthews, who lived to 112 and worked for 70 years with the restaurant owner's family, the lightly battered fried-green tomatoes ($5.25) are served piping hot and have a lemony flavor. Don't leave Jestine's without trying the melts-in-your-mouth, sticky sweet Coca Cola Cake, $5.95 (251 Meeting Street, no website, no reservations). Nick's Barbecue—along with huge portions of good pulled pork, brisket, and chicken, topped either with a vinegary barbecue sauce or a smoky hot habanera sauce—serves fried green tomatoes with a thick cornmeal crust heavily seasoned with salt and pepper. Delicious. My husband's favorite, though, was Nick's sweet potato pecan pudding, a side dish that could easily be dessert (nicksbarbq.com, lunch for two about $25). Shrimp grits are another staple of Low Country cuisine and are perfectly seasoned at Anson, an upscale splurge. Prepared with shrimp stock, tidbits of bacon and bacon drippings, sprinkled with scallions and roasted tomato, every bite was heavenly. A diner at the next table so enjoyed tasting her daughter's shrimp grits, she persuaded her daughter to swap entrees (ansonrestaurant.com, dinner for two, with wine & dessert, about $120). No surprise that grits are widely available, and even at a no-nonsense diner like Sweetwater Café, the cheesy grits are a bowlful of comfort food at $5.99 (but skip Sweetwater's biscuits, which seemed straight from a supermarket). Great fresh seafood is a Charleston tradition. The culinary emphasis of Fish is no secret. While it offers a variety of French/Asian fusion, a popular dish is the Naked Fish, the catch-of-the-day prepared simply with olive oil, salt, and pepper, to showcase its freshness (fishrestaurantcharleston.com). Or go early for the Fish happy hour specials, beginning at 4:30 pm. Fortunately for those of us who love to burn calories almost as much as we love to eat, Charleston is also a walking city. On three visits, I've never rented a car, since the airport is an easy taxi ride ($14 to share a van, about $38 for a taxi) and downtown Charleston is pedestrian-friendly. Pack comfortable walking shoes to fully appreciate the architectural splendor of the area South of Broad Street. It is a neighborhood of 18th- and 19th-century mansions located close to one another, close to the waterfront, and within walking distance of the downtown shopping and dining area. Many houses have two story open-air porches, called "piazzas," situated to capture the prevailing breezes. Many houses have carefully cultivated gardens that can be glimpsed behind elaborate wrought iron gates. A handful, such as the Edmondston-Alston House (edmondstonalston.com), are open for tours by local docents, who can tell you about the family, the furnishings, and the architecture. Downtown Charleston is also home to the lovely historic campus of the College of Charleston, where you can stroll the brick walkways and admire the architecture and trees draped in Spanish moss. The campus welcomes visitors and offers student-guided tours, a map for a self-guided tour, and even a downloadable app for a self-guided tour (cofc.edu/visit). The Charleston City Market is four blocks of covered, open-air buildings, where local artisans sell pottery, wood carvings, soaps, wearable art, and other crafts. At the Market or on the sidewalk in front of the federal courthouse, you might see weavers turning sweet grass into baskets, and selling them on the spot. You can window shop at the many art galleries, upscale retailers like Jill St. John, or mid-price chains such as Urban Outfitters, or visit Butterfly (butterflyconsignments.com), a consignment shop filled with deals on fashion-forward women's clothing. For a free rest stop for tired feet, try people-watching from a plush chair in the lobby of the Embassy Suites hotel, the pink fortress-like structure that formerly housed the Citadel Military College and where some guest rooms feature gun ports (embassysuites3.hilton.com). Or cross Marion Square, a welcoming public park that hosts a farmers market on Saturday mornings, and find a comfy chair in the grand lobby of the Francis Marion hotel, built in 1924 and extensively renovated in 1996. If you stay at the Francis Marion, a weekend getaway package offered until December 2014 includes $50 per night of certificates for the hotel restaurant, The Swamp Fox, or for any participating restaurant on Upper King Street, most located within easy walking distance of the hotel (francismarionhotel.com). Nightlife on upper King Street has picked up in recent years, and now features lively upscale lounges with dress codes and lines that spill out onto the sidewalk. The bars' success has caused some tension with their neighbors over limited parking and the noise of patrons leaving at the 2 a.m. closing time. On every visit to Charleston, I am again struck by the friendly service. And that unpretentious hospitality is another draw for a lovely walkable city with great food. Sarah Ricks is a Clinical Professor at Rutgers Law School—Camden and a lifelong travel junkie.

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