Made in America

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The Harley-Davidson factory in Kansas City, Mo., is the only Harley facility where motorcycles like the sleek, liquid-cooled V-Rod series are assembled from start to finish.
Courtesy Harley-Davidson Motor Company
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On the assembly line at Harley-Davidson, hundreds of workers perform precise tasks like attaching the handlebars and fitting the engine. Lending a (metal) hand are more than 70 robots that help with processes like polishing.
Courtesy Harley-Davidson Motor Company
Harley-Davidson's sleek V-Rod is made entirely at the Harley-Davidson plant in Kansas City, Mo.
Courtesy Harley-Davidson Motor Company
You can't miss the Louisville Slugger factory—a 120-foot-tall bat leans against the main building. (Unlike the wooden models made inside, this one is made of carbon steel.)
Courtesy H&B
On the 25-minute Louisville Slugger tour, see the lathe whittle a 37-inch-long cylinder of kiln-dried wood into a Slugger in just 60 to 90 seconds, spewing sawdust everywhere in a feat that's a favorite with kids.
Courtesy H&B
The branding machine burns the company's name into each finished bat on the Louisville Slugger tour.
Courtesy H&B
As part of the Louisville Slugger tour, visit the adjacent museum and swing a bat that was used by Mickey Mantle and take a look at the notches Babe Ruth carved into his favorite bat for every home run he hit with it during the 1927 season.
Courtesy H&B
The Boeing tour in Mukilteo, Wash., starts in the Future of Flight Gallery.
Courtesy Future of Flight
From three open-air observation decks, tours at the massive Boeing factory look down on 747s, 777s, and the imposing new 787 Dreamliners (wing span 186 feet).
Courtesy Future of Flight
The venerable Steinway & Sons company got its start in Germany. Now the factory is in Long Island City, N.Y. Here a craftsman "voices" a piano; every piano has a distinctive sound, its "soul.
Courtesy Steinway & Sons
On the Steinway & Sons tour, see master technicians make subtle adjustments to virtually every part of the piano, weighting individual keys and threading each string through its own tuning pin.
Courtesy Steinway & Sons
The instruments at Steinway & Sons are fashioned by hand; first, 22-foot-long maple planks are shaped into a grand piano's distinctive U-shaped body.
Courtesy Steinway & Sons
The highlight of the 55-minute, behind-the-scenes CNN tour in Atlanta is a view into the newsroom, a huge glass cubicle that some reporters wryly call the fishbowl.
Courtesy CNN
On the CNN tour, news junkies will get a kick out of Studio 7E, a replica of a real set, complete with prompters and green screens.
Courtesy CNN
On the NBC Studios tour in New York City, visitors are escorted to sets where programs like the Today show and Saturday Night Live (pictured) are shot. The highlight for many on the hourlong tour is a peek at the control center that oversees more than 100 hours of programming per day.
Courtesy NBC
At Kohler, in Kohler, Wis., many of the kitchen and bath fixtures are still made the old-fashioned way. In the pottery area, workers shape toilets and sink basins.
Courtesy Destination Kohler
In this historical photo, workers move a bathtub mold. Not much has changed over the years: Molten iron is still poured into molds, which a machine peels away to reveal clawfoot tubs that steam and glow a bright orange.
Courtesy Destination Kohler
Check out Kohler's completed products and designs at the 36,000-foot Kohler Design Center.
Courtesy Destination Kohler

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