New York's Hopping Beer Scene

Photos
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A former candy, tobacco, and spice storage facility, Radegast became stein central in 2007.
— Stephanie Adams
Well-priced specials keep both the suds and the good feelings flowing at Radegast; on weekdays that vibe's often abetted by live 1920s- and '30s-era jazz.
— Stephanie Adams
Radegast draws brew-loving residents of Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood: soccer fans, young families, and music lovers.
— Stephanie Adams
The dozen-odd draft list at Radegast includes the stellar wheat beer Franziskaner and the citrusy Blanche de Bruxelles.
— Stephanie Adams
Michael "Bao" Huynh, who presides over a growing Vietnamese restaurant empire, has brought a little bit of Southeast Asia to the Lower East Side with Bia.
— Stephanie Adams
The options on Bia's all-Asian beer list are served in ice-filled metal pails in batches of six, 12, or 24 bottles.
— Stephanie Adams
A heaping plate of kielbasa and fries at Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden.
— Courtesy maura/Flickr
At Bohemian Hall & Beer Garden, guzzling post-collegiates keep the garden's picnic tables packed late into the night.
— Courtesy wallyg/Flickr
Glasses at Hallo Berlin, where the Radeberger pilsner is a popular choice.
— Stephanie Adams
Long-standing, easygoing Hallo Berlin takes the beer garden indoors, with picnic tables, flags, and pennants from all over Germany.
— Stephanie Adams
Hallo Berlin fills up in the evenings as workers make their exodus from Midtown's office towers and locals stop by to shoot the breeze over some wurst.
— Stephanie Adams
Don't come to Loreley looking for the newest microbrew from the East Coast: The draft and bottle list here is German-only.
— Stephanie Adams
Loreley has a desirable patio-like garden in the back, where the concrete walls are brightened with planters.
— Stephanie Adams
Loreley's interior sticks to a stripped-down aesthetic—exposed-brick walls, a planked floor, and no kitsch.
— Stephanie Adams
Vol de Nuit is sparsely decorated with a pressed-tin ceiling, hurricane lamps, and a small bar cozied up against a back corner and dimly lit with bare red lightbulbs.
— Stephanie Adams
When beer halls start to seem too rowdy and loud, head to this much calmer bar, Vol de Nuit—rarely crowded despite a prime Greenwich Village location.
— Stephanie Adams
In a never-deserted corner of the party-hearty East Village, Zum Schneider gets especially hopping on weekends and during soccer matches.
— Courtesy richardgreene.com
Mösl Franzi, a.k.a. owner Sylvester Schneider (far right), and the JaJaJa's playing at the 10th anniversary of Zum Schneider on August 19, 2010.
— Courtesy richardgreene.com

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