Photos: A DIY Tour of Berlin

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Photos
Head for the front row on top of the M29 double-decker bus for the best views. Just missed it? Don't worry: Buses come by almost every five minutes.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Türken-Markt, in the Kreuzberg neighborhood, offers more than just culinary delights and trinkets—it's also a great introduction to Berlin's cultural mix.
— Courtesy Peter Breuer
Oranienstrasse has shops selling Turkish sweets and nuts galore.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Small, family-owned businesses are the backbone of Oranienstrasse.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
An Oranienstrasse shop demonstrates how to maximize every inch of display space.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Waiting for the bus at Oranienplatz.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Berlin's best Black Forest cherry cake lures chocoholics to distinguished café Kuchenkaiser.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Inside the ultramodern Berlinische Galerie.
— Courtesy Peter Breuer
Berlin's Jewish Museum, a jagged zinc-clad structure in the shape of a deconstructed Star of David designed by Daniel Libeskind.
— Courtesy Peter Breuer
How did Bob Marley and Che make it into this Checkpoint Charlie ostalgie fest?
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Near Checkpoint Charlie, pieces of the wall that was.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
East Germany's signature car, the Trabi, above a map of Berlin showing the four zones it was divided into after World War II.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Neue Nationalgalerie, an exquisite space dedicated to 20th-century art.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Hiroshimasteg, a small bridge over the Landwehrkanal, is near the Bauhaus-Archiv and commemorates the bombs that destroyed Hiroshima.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Bauhaus-Archiv roofline reflects the groundbreaking designs inside.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The interior of Wittenbergplatz subway station, one of Berlin's oldest.
— Courtesy Peter Breuer
One of Europe's biggest department stores, the KaDeWe, looms behind a memorial of the German concentration camps.
— Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
A sculpture symbolizing Berlin's post-war partition frames the tower of the Kaiser-Gedächtnis-Kirche, damaged in World War II.
— Courtesy Peter Breuer

The public M29 bus travels four miles from an artsy eastern neighborhood to the well-to-do heart of former West Berlin. Hop on and off for a dose of the city's history, architecture, and sweets.

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