Photos: A DIY Tour of Berlin

BerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlinBerlin
1 / 18 Photos
Head for the front row on top of the M29 double-decker bus for the best views. Just missed it? Don't worry: Buses come by almost every five minutes.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Türken-Markt, in the Kreuzberg neighborhood, offers more than just culinary delights and trinkets—it's also a great introduction to Berlin's cultural mix.
Courtesy Peter Breuer
Oranienstrasse has shops selling Turkish sweets and nuts galore.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Small, family-owned businesses are the backbone of Oranienstrasse.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
An Oranienstrasse shop demonstrates how to maximize every inch of display space.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Waiting for the bus at Oranienplatz.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Berlin's best Black Forest cherry cake lures chocoholics to distinguished café Kuchenkaiser.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Inside the ultramodern Berlinische Galerie.
Courtesy Peter Breuer
Berlin's Jewish Museum, a jagged zinc-clad structure in the shape of a deconstructed Star of David designed by Daniel Libeskind.
Courtesy Peter Breuer
How did Bob Marley and Che make it into this Checkpoint Charlie ostalgie fest?
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Near Checkpoint Charlie, pieces of the wall that was.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
East Germany's signature car, the Trabi, above a map of Berlin showing the four zones it was divided into after World War II.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Neue Nationalgalerie, an exquisite space dedicated to 20th-century art.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
Hiroshimasteg, a small bridge over the Landwehrkanal, is near the Bauhaus-Archiv and commemorates the bombs that destroyed Hiroshima.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The Bauhaus-Archiv roofline reflects the groundbreaking designs inside.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
The interior of Wittenbergplatz subway station, one of Berlin's oldest.
Courtesy Peter Breuer
One of Europe's biggest department stores, the KaDeWe, looms behind a memorial of the German concentration camps.
Courtesy Erika Jakubassa
A sculpture symbolizing Berlin's post-war partition frames the tower of the Kaiser-Gedächtnis-Kirche, damaged in World War II.
Courtesy Peter Breuer

The public M29 bus travels four miles from an artsy eastern neighborhood to the well-to-do heart of former West Berlin. Hop on and off for a dose of the city's history, architecture, and sweets.

Related Content