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  • Lake Placid, New York
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    Lake Placid,

    New York

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    Lake Placid is a village in the Adirondack Mountains in Essex County, New York, United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 2,303.

    The village of Lake Placid is near the center of the town of North Elba, 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Plattsburgh. Lake Placid, along with nearby Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake, comprise what is known as the Tri-Lakes region.

    Lake Placid hosted the 1932 and the 1980 Winter Olympics. Lake Placid also hosted the 1972 Winter Universiade, the 2000 Goodwill Games, and will host the 2023 Winter Universiade.

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    Deals

    25 great winter travel deals for 2022

    With Covid-19 vaccinations on the rise and people continuing to wear masks, practice social distancing and show proof of vaccination as needed, folks are venturing out again as safely as possible. A recent study by TripIt showed flight bookings are up 320% compared to last year, while the numbers increased by 404% for car rentals, 271% for lodging and 182% for vacation rentals. Whether you’re seeking seasonal winter sports, a sunny beach escape or a city staycation closer to home, there are plenty of wintertime deals to be had. Here’s a look at some of our favorite travel packages around the U.S., Mexico and the Caribbean, all available this winter for under $265 a night. Massachusetts Fresh mountain air and lakeside views await at this member-favorite B&B The Black Swan Inn in the Berkshires (Lee, MA). Budget Travel Members get nightly rates from $105. New Hampshire New Hampshire Escape - $179. When we say The Inn at Thorn Hill in Jackson, NH is a member favorite, we're not kidding: 100% of members who stayed here loved their experience, citing the inn's outstanding service, great food and romantic setting. Now, you can nab a room for just $179 per night for dates into spring. New York Winter warriors who love cross-country and alpine skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating and tobogganing should head to High Peaks Resort in Lake Placid, about a 4.5-hour drive from New York City. The resort’s two-night Cross Country Ski and Snowshoe package, from $203 a night, offers breakfast, admission to the Cascade Ski Center and complimentary snowshoe rentals when you book and stay by March 31, 2022. Washington, DC in winter. Photo by tomwachs, iStock. Washington, D.C. Kimpton George Hotel’s packages include overnight accommodations at this chic Capitol Hill boutique, plus little extras like nightly valet parking or daily breakfast for two. Rates start at $263 a night. Nearby, Kimpton Hotel Monaco’s Park and Play package, available from $263 a night, throws in perks like complimentary overnight parking and a $25 daily dining credit to use at its onsite restaurant, Dirty Habit. North Carolina Skyline Lodge, a recently-renovated boutique property in Highlands, located about two hours from Asheville, is offering rates from $170 a night this winter. Escape the crowds at this mountaintop resort during the week and score a bottle of sparkling wine with the Wine Down Weekdays package, with rates from $207 a night. South Carolina Just 30 minutes from Charleston, Wild Dunes Resort, a Destination by Hyatt property in Isle of Palms, is a wonderful place to spend time with the family or your beloved on a romantic getaway by the beach. With rates from $161 all winter long, you’ll have access to a swanky spa, tennis courts and two Tom Fazio-designed golf courses, as well as a variety of menu options from nine onsite restaurants and bars. Georgia Georgia Wine Country: 2-Night Retreat incl. Vino - $299. Waking up to sunrise over the Blue Ridge Mountains. Days spent hiking and sampling local vino. Kicking back fireside on a crisp night. All things in store for those who can nab 2 nights (or longer) at this charming North Georgia lodge with this deal for travel into spring. Miami Beach lifeguard station. Photo by JC Ruiz, iStock Florida Planning a Miami escape or staycation? Head to the Kimpton Hotel Palomar South Beach, where the Park + Play package, from $146 a night, lets you spend the night in luxe accommodations and receive complimentary valet parking. Texas In Dallas, the Kimpton Pittman Hotel’s family package gives guests late 4 p.m. check-out, a create-your-own s’mores kit and directions for an epic mural scavenger hunt through the Deep Ellum neighborhood. Rates start at $203 a night. Illinois Save 30% when you book four or more nights at the Royal Sonesta Chicago Downtown this winter and use promo code Save30. Rates start at $143 a night for four nights and you must book and stay by March 31, 2022. Colorado Now through March 2022, save on a luxurious stay at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, with rates from $259 a night as part of its Winter Spectacular package. Just 40 minutes from Denver, Hotel Boulderado’s Winter Wanderlust, lets you stay two nights and get one free, with rooms from $139 a night when you book three or more nights now through April 2022. If you’d rather stay in the heart of Downtown Denver, head to The Curtis, where several staycation deals are available. Park and stay packages start at $139 a night, while another deal gives you 15% off stays of at least three nights and 50% off parking, with rates from $109 a night. If your favorite fur baby is tagging along, the Shaggy & Scooby Doo Pet Package includes waived pet fees (saving you $25–$100 a night depending on pet type) and plenty of pet treats. California Save up to 15% on a stay at the Apple Farm Inn in San Luis Obispo when you book directly through the hotel’s website — nightly rates start at $101 all year long. Make the most of a winter getaway to sunny San Diego with a stay at this 4-star Westin, located less than a mile from The Gaslamp Quarter, Little Italy and the waterfront. Lock in discounted rates and a daily credit and stay any day of the week through March. Portland in Winter. Credit: 321photography, iStock Oregon While Portland’s Hotel Zags is offering several deals, our favorite is the Escape Your In-laws package, which gives you a bucket of beers and a $10 credit to use at the onsite restaurant. Rates start at $99 a night now through March 31, 2022. The Bidwell Marriott Portland is offering a special Night on the Town package, which includes complimentary valet parking, two free drinks at High Horse and two MAX light rail passes to use to check out the city during your stay. Use promo code XYO to score rooms from $199 a night when you book and stay by March 31, 2022. Plan a romantic weekend getaway with the Hyatt Regency Portland at the Oregon Convention Center’s Romance in the City of Roses package, available from $229 a night. You’ll get your choice of Willamette Valley Pinot Noir or locally sourced craft beer, as well as chocolates, Albina City nuts, romantic rose petals for your room and the chance to sleep in with 12 p.m. check-out. Washington Head outdoors this season and hit the hiking and biking trails at Suncadia Resort, located about 90 minutes from Seattle. Rates start at $225 a night in January for World of Hyatt loyalty program members (it’s free to sign up for an account). Mexico. Photo by Laura Brown, Budget Travel Mexico and the Caribbean If you’re planning to travel internationally, remember to stay on top of testing requirements for both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers returning to the U.S. Perched on Medano Beach (one of the area’s few swimmable beaches) and just minutes from downtown Cabo San Lucas, the 5-star Villa del Arco Beach Resort & Spa earns rave reviews for its spacious suites, exceptional service and superior food. For a limited time book a 3-night stay for $555. Rate gets a Deluxe Studio with a king or two queen beds, kitchenette and balcony overlooking the lush gardens. From now until January 17, 2022, you can save up to 64% at Karisma Hotels & Resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean, including brands like Nickelodeon Hotels & Resorts, Azul Beach Resorts, Margaritaville Island Reserve Resorts and El Dorado Spa Resorts, among others. Rates for all-inclusive stays through January 4, 2023, start at $151 per person per night depending on your dates and desired resort. Save on a stay at the chic Spanish Court Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica, where rates start at $159 a night and include breakfast for two and welcome cocktails. For a real treat, book the Rejuvenation package, which, for $235 a night, throws in dinner for two at onsite restaurant Rojo, two complimentary rum punch cocktails at Cabana and a 50% discount on one treatment at the Zen Spa. In the Bahamas, Atlantis Paradise Island is celebrating winter with an epic January sale now through January 24, 2022. Bookings made for stays by February 28, 2023, reflect savings up to 30% at The Coral, 25% at The Royal and 20% at The Reef. During the sale, guests can also score an extra $20 per $100 of purchased Experience Credits, while guests booking rooms at The Cove will receive a $100 daily resort credit to use toward dining and other attractions. Discounted nightly rates at Atlantis Paradise Island begin at $172.

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    Inspiration

    The best US lakes for recreation

    Lake Powell Lake Powell is a reservoir in Glen Canyon National Recreational Area near the Utah and Arizona border. The water is a crisp blue, and snakes through the red rock canyon, offering plenty of opportunities for water sports and recreation. Visitors to Lake Powell can take a boat tour, go waterskiing and visit Cathedral in the Desert, a stunning rock monument located in Lake Powell. Its location near the Grand Canyon and Monument Valley provides an amazing opportunity for adventurers to have the road trip of a lifetime. Lake Lanier Lake Lanier is located in North Georgia, about an hour from Atlanta and a short drive from Chattanooga. It is a man-made reservoir made by damming the Chattahoochee River to provide electricity and flood control for nearby Atlanta. More than 10 million people visit Lake Lanier annually, with many of them using the Lanier Islands as a recreational hub. The Lanier Islands have plenty of lodging and dining options for all budgets, including tent camping and an RV park. Lake of the Ozarks Missouri's crown jewel of a lake sits in the middle of the state and offers a world-class destination. Visitors can find a plethora of land-based activities, restaurants and accommodations. In addition, there are countless marinas available to rent or store a boat. There are also 32 hiking trails near the lake, along with four caves to explore. There is inexpensive camping available nearby at Ozarks State Park and Ha Ha Tonka State Park. Pickwick Lake © Laura Brown / Budget Travel Pickwick Lake, Tennessee The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) created a series of 9 major dams across Tennessee during the 1930s and 1940s to bring affordable electricity and jobs to an area stricken by the Great Depression. Today, all the TVA lakes are great for water sports and recreation, but our favorite is Pickwick Lake, on the border of Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi, just outside Memphis. Yellow Creek Cove on the lake is a constant party for boaters in the summer and features a rope swing into the water below. There is a great camping spot at Pickwick Landing State Park, where there is also a marina and available boat rentals. Big Bear Lake Big Bear Lake in Southern California, the ‘Jewel of the San Bernardino National Forest,’ prides itself on being open all four seasons for water recreation. Located 100 miles northeast of Los Angeles, it also can be accessed easily from Las Vegas or Phoenix. Big Bear offers a mountain atmosphere, with hiking trails, winter skiing, and summer swimming. The heart of Big Bear Lake is at Big Bear Village, a charming small town that serves as the region’s hub for dining and lodging. Make sure to check out the local festivals at The Village at Halloween and Christmas. Lake Tahoe © MariuszBlach / Getty Images Lake Tahoe Lake Tahoe sits on the border of California and Nevada, near Reno. It is the second deepest lake in the United States (after Crater Lake) and is known for its incredibly clear water and vibrant colors. Tahoe is known as a gateway for recreational adventure. Visitors can access hundreds of miles of beautiful hiking trails, as well as rent paddleboards and kayaks to explore the lake. Lake Mead Lake Mead lies outside of Las Vegas, and is the largest reservoir in the United States, formed by the Hoover Dam. Boating in Lake Mead is a popular activity, with four separate marinas available to rent or store boats. Lake Mead Cruises also takes a nightly cruise to the Hoover Dam and back. Lake Mead is heaven for fishing and offers some of the best sport fishing in the United States. Lake Placid © Chuck Robinson Photography / Getty Images Lake Placid Lake Placid in the Adirondacks is a classic New York mountain town, with views so legendary the town was selected to host the Winter Olympics in 1932 and 1980. In the winter, Lake Placid has amazing opportunities to snow ski and snowboard. In the summer, Lake Placid is a utopia for waterboarding and tubing. For those who own their own boat, there are several public launch points. For those on a budget, there are hostels off the lake for low rates or camping in nearby campgrounds or in the Adirondack backcountry. Lake Winnebago Lake Winnebago is a glacial lake in eastern Wisconsin, north of Milwaukee near Appleton and Oshkosh. It is a relatively shallow lake, known for great fishing in both the summer and the winter, with a prominent ice fishing industry. The lake’s most abundant fish are the Walleye, Perch, Sturgeon and Bass. Boats are readily available for rent at nearby Marinas. Boaters have access to more than 18,000 acres of water, including Lake Butte des Morts and the Fox River. Lake Winnepesaukee You can explore more than 250 different islands in New Hampshire’s Lake Winnepesaukee, or hike in the nearby White Mountains. There are a plethora of small villages on the shores of the lake, which can be reached by either boat or car, and each offers an individual flavor. Rent a boat and go waterboarding in the summer or plan a snowboarding adventure in the winter. When you’re ready to go indoors, check out one of the many breweries nearby, such as the Woodstock Inn Brewery in Woodstock. The nearest major city is Manchester. SPONSORED BY GEICOAs always, prior to travel, make sure you are up to date on your destination’s health and safety restrictions. See how much you could save when you bundle your car and boat insurance with GEICO. Carefully crafted collaboratively between GEICO, Lonely Planet and Budget Travel. Both parties provided research and curated content to produce this story. We disclose when information isn’t ours.

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    Road Trips

    5 fall foliage road trips through New York State

    So now, it’s a good time to jump on a road trip. Here are our suggested itineraries for a four-day road trip throughout upstate New York. However, read up on CDC and statewide COVID-19 mandates before heading out. For reference, I Love New York, the state’s tourism board, puts out a weekly fall foliage map report on their website. Chasm (Little Grand Canyon of East), New York. ©ujjwalstha/ShutterstockRoad trip 1: The Adirondacks Where to Stop: Lake Placid tells about the 1980 Winter Games with present-day restaurants and attractions and is close to the High Peaks Wilderness. Its challenging 46 Peaks will reward you with sweeping foliage views. Eight miles from Lake Placid, Saranac Lake has a buzzing downtown with shops, galleries and restaurants, or see Saranac Lake 6ers, a close-by collection of six beautiful peaks. Or jaunt along the scenic route to Tupper Lake and to the Wild Center, whose Wild Wild platformed trail heads across the treetops. The Tawahus Road leads to the Upper Works Trailhead, which provides an alternative route to traditional northern or eastern access to the High Peaks Wilderness. Trails at the Crown Point State Historic Site, on the shores of Lake Champlain, lead to two Revolutionary War-era fort ruins. In Bolton Landing, Adirondack Extreme Adventure Course is the largest aerial tree-top adventure park in the U.S. The Lake George area is a premier hiking destination with unparalleled beauty of the Adirondacks. Some hikes, such as The Pinnacle, jaunt along wooded trails with a switchback or two to ease the climbing burden. Where to eat: In Lake Placid, Golden Arrow’s restaurant, Generations, is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with grown and raised locally menu. Up the road from Crown Point State Historic Site, Gunnison's Orchards & Bakery serves up fresh-baked pastries, bread, cookies, pies, and their cinnamon cider donuts. End your day at Ledge Hill Brewery, for handcrafted ales and lagers mindfully brewed in Westport. Road Trip 2: Capital-Saratoga Where to stop: Starting from the Helderberg Hilltowns, John Boyd Thacher State Park in Voorheesville is perched atop the Helderberg Escarpment, with panoramic views of the Hudson-Mohawk valleys and the Adirondack and Green mountains. After hiking along the park’s Indian Ladder Trail, take a nine-minute drive to Indian Ladder Farms in Altamont. Kids can pick apples and pet farm animals and parents can unwind at the cidery and brewery tasting room. Lastly, at Falls View Park, marvel at Cohoes Falls, New York State’s second largest waterfall. Where to eat: Nine Pin Cider, New York's first farm cidery, has a tasting room in Albany’s Warehouse District, with a rotating selection. Find a traditional or a new flavorful spin on the apple cider donut at Cider Belly Doughnuts, in the heart of downtown Albany. Afternoon sun on sunset rock during Autumn, overlooking North-South Lake in the Catskills Mountains of New York. ©lightphoto/Getty Images Road Trip 3: Hudson Valley Where to stop: From New York City, first explore the lower Hudson Valley river towns, beginning in Tarrytown at the Lyndhurst Mansion along the Hudson River. Next, drive north to Garrison to see the Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center, the former home of industrial designer Russel Wright. Then, Dia:Beacon is a contemporary art museum in a Nabisco box-printing factory, whose exterior grounds were designed by artist Robert Irwin. Head to the Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting Poughkeepsie and Highland. From Highland, drive north approximately 25 minutes to Kingston to check out the historic waterfront district. Pumpkin and apple picking can be done at Samascott Farm Orchard and Golden Harvest Farms in nearby Valatie. Where to eat: In Tarrytown, stop by the Sweet Grass Grill for a local and seasonal focused meal. In Kingston, Outdated Café has a range of salads, egg dishes, and more; purchase antiques too. For drinks, hot spots include River Outpost Brewing (Peekskill), Wolf & Warrior (White Plains), Decadent Ales (Mamaroneck), Sing Sing Kill (Ossining) and Captain Lawrence Brewing Company (Elmsford). Road Trip 4: Central New York Where to stop: From the North, the Scenic Byway - Route 20’s scenery offers unique of shopping experiences. Lake Classic Outfitters will fit the bill at Sam Smith’s Boatyard and The Blue Mingo Grill overlooking Otsego Lake. In Cooperstown, find not only the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, but also the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum. Main Street is the visitor hub with baseball-themed shops, eateries and the home of Doubleday Field. Where to eat: Grab a bite to eat and an ice cream with a life-sized Elvis statue at Jerry’s Place just before reaching Cooperstown. Brooks’ House of BBQ is how to fill your belly when traveling from Oneonta in the south, or try a Bohemian-feel, experiential meal at Origins. In Cooperstown, Alex’s Bistro is a local favorite with flavor concoctions unmatched. The Middle Falls At Letchworth State Park In New York. ©Jim Vallee/Shutterstock Road Trip 5: Finger Lakes Where to stop: This trip takes you from Canandaigua along Routes 5 and 20 and down to Naples, home of the grape pie. County Road #12 Scenic Overlook, Kershaw Park and Onanda Park in Canandaigua offer scenic vistas and fresh lake water. In Naples, go to Artizanns for NY made souvenirs and stop by any of the local stands for Grape Pie. In Canandaigua, there’s a cute Main Street with all kinds of shops and a couple of roof top bars. Take a fun farm diversion to go to Lazy Acres Alpacas in Bloomfield. Finger Lakes National Forest, the only national forest in New York State, is located on a ridge between Seneca and Cayuga lakes with over 30 miles of interconnecting trails. They include the 12-mile Interloken Trail, which is part of the Finger Lakes Trail Association network. The Keuka Lake Outlet Trail lies between the villages of Penn Yan and Dresden and measures nearly seven miles of wooded trail and along waterfalls. Where to eat: Ethnic diversity is noticeable in Canandaigua’s restaurant scene or check the craft breweries in the area. In Naples. Monica’s Pies is known for its grape pie and Brew and Brats at Arbor Hill has locally made sausages, pies, wine and beers.

    News

    Travel News: Climate Change Is Drowning Venice, Columbus Celebrates Somali Culture, and the Adirondacks Throw a Holiday Party

    From disaster in one of our favorite European cities to a unique cultural celebration in the Midwest and holiday festivities in the mountains of upstate New York, this week’s travel news reminds us to cherish our communities around the globe. CLIMATE CHANGE IS DROWNING VENICE More than 70 percent of Venice is currently flooded due to heavy rains, winds, and rising tides. Weather researchers from UNESCO, U.S. Climate Action Network, and other organizations note that global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions is contributing to the melting of polar ice caps and the rising sea levels that threaten the unique Italian City, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and other low-lying coastal regions around the world. The current flooding in Venice is one of the top five worst instances of high water since the 1930s. A recent study by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that the world must cut greenhouse gas emissions to 45 percent below 2010 levels by 2030 to avoid climate disasters such as catastrophic storms, flooding, and droughts due to warming and rising sea levels. COLUMBUS CELEBRATES SOMALI CULTURE With foreign-born residents comprising 9.3 percent of its population, Columbus, Ohio, is a surprisingly diverse heartland city, and its heterogeneity is evident in its embrace of refugees and immigrants of all stripes. Perhaps most notably, the state capital is home to some 60,000 Somali expats, the second-largest concentration of its kind in the country, and the ethnic group will be in the spotlight when the Columbus Somali Culture Festival ($15) kicks off on Nov. 17. Hosted by Our Helpers (ourhelpers.org), a local nonprofit that helps immigrants adjust to life in a new country, the second-annual event will feature a range of activities, from a fashion show and traditional dances to performances by renowned Somali singers, plus an array of vendors showcasing the regional cuisine’s diverse traditions and influences. THE ADIRONDACKS THROW A HOLIDAY PARTY Lake Placid, NY, in the Adirondack Mountains, is an utterly charming alpine village with a better-than-average shot at seeing snowfall in early December, Just in time for the 10th annual Holiday Village Stroll, Friday, Dec. 7 through Sunday, Dec. 9, 2018. Learn more at lakeplacid.com/holidays, and consider some of these fun activities in the Empire State’s north country: Free skating party at the Lake Placid Olympic CenterSanta’s arrival by fire truck on Main StreetBreakfast with SantaFree holiday movies in an old-fashioned movie theatreTraditional Yule Log HuntMid’s Park Holiday Celebration with tree lighting and special performance with the Lake Placid school chorusSleigh rides around Mirror LakeCookie decorating, holiday card making, and gingerbread house making workshops“Golden Ladle” soup, chili, and chowder competition with complimentary tastings for allLocal beer tastingsLive bands all weekend at select restaurants

    Road Trips

    4 Easy & Gorgeous Fall Foliage Trips From NYC

    Sure, the fall colors in New York City’s Central Park, Prospect Park, and New York Botanical Garden can be absolutely beautiful. But for a taste of country-style leaf peeping and autumn festivities, city dwellers have an array of options that are within reach. Here, four of our favorite foliage getaways. 1. Harriman State Park, Rockland & Orange Counties, NY We love Harriman State Park, which stretches across Rockland and Orange counties, making it convenient for New Yorkers and New Jersey residents alike. This time of year it is hands-down one of the most gorgeous places to drink in those autumn colors, with 31 lakes and reservoirs, 200 miles of hiking trails, two beaches, two campgrounds, and a laid-back vibe that makes you feel that you have truly escaped from the city. 2. Lake Minnewaska State Park, New Paltz, NY A little farther upstate, about 90 minutes from the city, Lake Minnewaska actually makes you feel that you have taken a trip out west, with granite peaks, and stunning vistas you may not associate with upstate New York. You can take an easy hike around Lake Minnewaska, or spend most of the day hiking deeper into the park and enjoying the fall colors. But do save time for dinner in New Paltz, with its barbecue, vegan specialties, and a wide array of comfort food. 3. Adirondack State Park, NY You will have to set aside a weekend or longer to visit Adirondack State Park, a few hours’ drive upstate, but you will be rewarded with mountain peaks, pristine lakes, and endless miles of rivers and streams for paddling canoes and kayaks. It is not only New York's biggest state park (bigger than most national parks!), but it's also one of the only state parks that is home to actual communities, including the welcoming villages of Saranac lake, Lake Placid, and other cool towns with amazing food, museums, galleries, and friendly locals. 4. Western Connecticut You don’t have to travel all the way to Vermont or New Hampshire to see classic New England fall foliage. Western Connecticut is home to Litchfield Hills and charming communities such as West Cornwall with its covered bridges, gorgeous Kent Falls State Park, and small towns where traditional New England architecture rubs elbows with gorgeous autumn colors and great restaurants. Visit nearby Mohawk Mountain for stunning views and outdoor activities.

    Road Trips

    You Will Love These Fall Road Trips Across Tennessee

    From Memphis to Nashville, from Chattanooga to the Great Smoky Mountains - and so much more - Tennessee's highways offer gorgeous vistas, welcoming cities and towns, and an array of activities for every member of the family. Here, three Tennessee road trips every traveler should take. Experience Unique Music and Culture: Memphis to Nashville In Memphis, jump-start your autumn excursion with a cup of java and a pumpkin duffin - a cake-donut-muffin hybrid - at Bluff City Coffee, before heading to the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel. The site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1968 assassination now chronicles the Civil Rights Movement  through films, artifacts, oral histories, and interactive media. The world-renowned museum is connected to the Lorraine Motel where a powerful exhibit shares Dr. King’s last hours, his iconic speech “Mountaintop” and Room 306 where he was staying April 4, 1968. The National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel is also one of 10 Tennessee sites located on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. For audiophiles, the stretch of the Americana Music Triangle’s Gold Record Road that runs from Memphis to Nashville (aka “Beale to Broadway”) is especially fertile. Start at Sun Studio, where Elvis recorded his first song; then follow in the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll’s footsteps to his home, Graceland, where you can see the famous “Jungle Room,” the Racquetball Building and the pool room. Visit Elvis’ Memphis where you’ll encounter Elvis’ extensive car collection, hundreds of artifacts including jumpsuits in Elvis The Entertainer Career Museum and even his airplanes. Stroll down Beale Street, the epicenter of African-American jazz and blues culture in the early 1900s, where the music and dancing never stop from the clubs and venues lining the strip. Visit the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, the world’s only museum dedicated to the genre. The Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum, created by the Smithsonian Institution, dives into Memphis’ global influence on music from the 1930s to today. Wrap up with a guided tour of the Gibson Guitar factory where skilled luthiers make some of the best guitars in the world right in front of your eyes. Jump on Highway 40 and head east until you reach the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center in Brownsville, where a mecca of Tina Turner memorabilia is housed in the one-room schoolhouse she attended as a child; the Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll grew up in Nutbush, not far away. Back on the road, it’s just under 30 miles to Jackson, home to both the International Rock-a-billy Hall of Fame and The Carnegie Featuring The Tennessee Legends of Music Museum which has exhibits on Sonny Boy Williamson, WS Holland and Carl Perkins. Outdoor lovers can visit Chickasaw State Park for a swim in Lake Placid or visit the stables for a guided horseback ride along a tranquil trail. From there, it’s an hour to Nashville, and Music City is not only the epicenter of country music in America but also a hotbed of world-class classical, jazz, and film music as well. Attend a show at one of the many music venues across the city where you’ll find not only country music but rock ‘n’ roll, hip hop, jazz, blues and more. For a full history on country music visit the Country Music Hall of Fame. Take a backstage tour of the Grand Ole Opry and take in a show during the live recorded show that “made country music famous.” See rising stars and music legends at the historic Ryman Auditorium or an up-and-comer at the Bluebird Café. See if you can stand the heat of Nashville’s hot chicken, prepared with secret spicy recipes from the grandfather of hot chicken, Prince’s or the more modern take, Hattie B’s and Party Fowl. Stay in a historic hotel like the Hermitage Hotel which has hosted presidents and famous musicians alike or rest your head in a museum hotel like Noelle or 21c Museum Hotel.  Sixty-five miles east on I-40 is Edgar Evins State Park, a sprawling 6,000 acres on the banks of Center Hill Lake with fishing, kayaking, canoeing, 11 miles of hiking trails, and 57 species of butterflies. Drive half an hour further to Burgess Falls State Park, a natural area on the Eastern Highland Rim with sheer bluffs, narrow ridges, and four waterfalls. Snap some shots for Instagram and then head for Sparta, where you can visit the Coal Miner Railroad Section House Museum, take in views of four different counties from Sunset Rock. Enjoy a glass of wine at Tennessee’s oldest winery, Highland Manor Winery in Jamestown. From there, it’s a straight shot down I-40 to Knoxville. The Scenic Route: Nashville to Chattanooga Just 45 minutes south of Nashville is Franklin, a small town filled with music, history and boutique shopping. Keep an eye out for the likes of Justin Timberlake and Winona Judd at Puckett’s Grocery’s famed open-mic night; peruse the country-chic offerings at White’s Mercantile, a general store owned by Holly Williams, granddaughter of Hank Williams and a musician in her own right; learn the extensive Civil War history through carefully preserved battlefields and homes that were on the frontlines; and pick up sweet treats for the road from Meridee’s Breadbasket. Motoring south down US-41A, you’ll pass Tullahoma, the site of both the world’s largest wind tunnel and a former World War II POW camp. (Reserve at least two weeks in advance for tours of Arnold Air Force Base.) While you’re in town, have a meal at One22West, a former department store now slinging American classics with a local twist, and have a lovely night’s stay at the Grand Lux Inn, a refurbished 1905 home in the town’s historic district—both favorites of Jack Daniel’s master distiller Jeff Arnett. Aviation buffs should consider an October trip for the Beechcraft Heritage Museum's annual Beech Party, a celebration of all things antique aircraft. From Tullahoma, it’s 13 miles to Lynchburg, home of Jack Daniel’s since 1866. Whiskey fans can tour the distillery and partake in a five-pour tasting, then hit Miss Mary Bobo's Boarding House for a great Southern meal. Afterwards, pick up provisions and memorabilia at the Lynchburg Hardware General Store, then take Rt. 50 to 41A south until you hit the neighboring Cumberland Plateau towns of Sewanee and Monteagle. Stop for lunch and admire the mountain vistas over sandwiches at Mountain Goat Market or pulled pork at the 135 Cafe, a diner gem tucked away behind a gas station and a truck stop. From Sewanee, take I-24 through the mountains to Chattanooga, East Tennessee’s Scenic City. For great leaf-peeping, bike the Tennessee Riverpark Greenway, then spend some time in the Bluff View Art District, a vibrant one-and-a-half-block neighborhood overlooking the Tennessee River where you’ll find regional, local and nationally-known artists’ works at the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Houston Museum and the River Gallery. Treat yourself to a meal at the Back Inn Café, where dishes like smoked-duck flatbread and shrimp and grits impress as much as the water views. After dinner, swing by the Chattanooga Whiskey Co. for a tour, a tasting, or a drink in the lounge, then hit the Chattanooga Choo-Choo, an historic terminal station that now houses the Songbirds Guitar Museum, for a nightcap. Food and Fall Colors: Chattanooga to Knoxville to Great Smoky Mountains National Park From Chattanooga, it’s 36 miles northeast to Booker T. Washington State Park, a 353-acre water-lover’s paradise on the shores of Chickamauga Lake. Wander the walking trail, challenge yourself with a mountain bike ride, take a boat out on the lake and go fishing, or picnic by the waterfront. The outdoor activity is bound to make you thirsty, and the family-owned Morris Vineyard & Tennessee Mountainview Winery in Charleston is just under an hour away. Sip a glass of muscadine blush or blueberry wine, made with fruit grown on the property’s more than 50 acres, in front of a stunning mountainous backdrop. From there, take Rt. 11 to Athens, and cap off a tour of Mayfield Dairy Farms with a scoop of homemade ice cream in the old-fashioned parlor. Next, it’s on to Madisonville for a stop at Benton’s Smoky Mountain Country Ham, where the renowned country ham and hickory-smoked bacon gets made for some of the top restaurants in the nation. Take a pound or two to go for the ultimate edible souvenir, and continue on to Knoxville, the football-mad home of the University of Tennessee Volunteers. In October, join the rowdy crowd for a game, then stick around to watch an array of adorable pups compete for best costume in the UT Gardens’ Howl-O-Ween Pooch Parade. Head up to the 4th-floor observation deck of the Sunsphere, a 266-foot tower built for the 1982 World’s Fair, for 360-degree views of the city, then slip over to the nearby Knoxville Museum of Art. Explore the lively dining scene at Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, run by James Beard Award-nominated chef Tim Love and Oliver Royale, breweries like Balter Beerworks and Alliance Brewing Company; donut shops like Status Dough, and pet-friendly patios like Stock & Barrel and Suttree’s High Gravity Tavern , before bouncing back to your boutique treehouse at Treetop Hideaways, just outside of town. Known as the Gateway to the Smokies, Gatlinburg is just over an hour away, at an access point to the nation’s most-visited and biodiverse national park: Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Take the winding Great Smoky Mountains Byway, but drive slowly to capture the many fall-foliage photo ops, especially in Cades Cove. (Don’t forget to check the park’s Weekly Fall Colors Update to catch the vivid autumn palette at its prime.) Get your fill of hiking, zip-lining, and rafting, but be sure to allow time for Gatlinburg proper, too. Take a tour and sample the spirits at Sugarlands Distilling Company, pick up some pottery or take a class at Fowler’s Clay Works, and don’t miss Anakeesta, Gatlinburg’s newest attraction, with its own mountain, dueling ziplining, canopy walk, shops, bakeries, barbecue, and stunning mountain views. Stop by Tennessee’s only ski park, Ober Gatlinburg, for the Oktoberfest celebration, and wash it all down with a shot of pumpkin pie moonshine from Ole Smoky Moonshine. For epic views on the way out of town, take the Gatlinburg Bypass and stop at the Gatlinburg Scenic Overlook before continuing on to Pigeon Forge, where the main attraction is Dollywood, Dolly Parton’s amusement park. Make a day of it there, but don’t skip the area’s assortment of specialty museums. Located in Dollywood, the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame and Museum celebrates the pioneers of the genre; nearby, stop by the Titanic Museum to see relics and recreations from the legendary luxury liner, snap selfies with stars like Lucille Ball and Michael Jackson at the Hollywood Wax Museum, and learn about the criminal underworld at the Alcatraz East Crime Museum, where infamous artifacts like O.J. Simpson’s white Bronco and Ted Bundy’s VW Beetle are on display. In neighboring Sevierville, motorheads will love the collection of high-performance vehicles at the Floyd Garrett Muscle Car Museum, while warbird enthusiasts will find plenty to enjoy at the Tennessee Museum of Aviation. Spend an afternoon running the obstacle course at the Sevier Air Trampoline & Ninja Warrior Park, take a scenic helicopter ride or go up in a 1927 biplane, and browse the merchandise at Smoky Mountain Knifeworks, the world’s largest knife showplace, where everything from collectible and antique knives to fantasy and superhero blades is on offer.  Don’t miss gorgeous nearby Foxfire Mountain, and be sure to treat yourself at Tanger Outlets, the sprawling mall with something for everyone. 

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    DESTINATION IN New York

    Lake George

    Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes, is a long, narrow oligotrophic lake located at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, in the northeastern portion of the U.S. state of New York. It lies within the upper region of the Great Appalachian Valley and drains all the way northward into Lake Champlain and the St. Lawrence River drainage basin. The lake is situated along the historical natural (Amerindian) path between the valleys of the Hudson and St. Lawrence Rivers, and so lies on the direct land route between Albany, New York, and Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The lake extends about 32.2 mi (51.8 km) on a north-south axis, is 187 ft (57 m) deep, and ranges from one to three miles (1.6 to 4.8 km) in width, presenting a significant barrier to east–west travel. Although the year-round population of the Lake George region is relatively small, the summertime population can swell to over 50,000 residents, many in the village of Lake George region at the southern end of the lake.Lake George drains into Lake Champlain to its north through a short stream, the La Chute River, with many falls and rapids, dropping 226 feet (69 m) in its 3.5-mile (5.6 km) course—virtually all of which is within the lands of Ticonderoga, New York, and near the site of the Fort Ticonderoga. Ultimately the waters flowing via the 106-mile-long (171 km) Richelieu River drain into the St. Lawrence River downstream and northeast of Montreal, and then into the North Atlantic Ocean above Nova Scotia.