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San Francisco's 5 Best Fog-Watching Spots

By Maya Stanton
January 27, 2022
A view of San Francisco shrouded in fog
Andre Gabriel Stanescu/Dreamstime
As selected by mysterious social media star—and newly minted book author—Karl the Fog.

On the spectrum of anthropomorphized inanimate objects with a hefty social media presence, San Francisco’s Karl the Fog (@karlthefog on Twitter and Instagram) is a clear favorite. Emerging in 2010 as the voice of the city’s seminal weather event, he’s since become a cultural touchstone, earning mentions in local weather reports and online media and even featuring as an answer to a question on Jeopardy. (“I'll take ‘Never Saw That Coming’ for $1,000, Alex,” he says.)

Though the person behind the accounts has chosen to remain anonymous over the years, Karl’s fame has only grown, and he’s picked up a few well-known fans in the process—actresses and Broadway bombshells among them. “One of my favorite followers is Audra McDonald (@AudraEqualityMc),” he says. “Not sure how she found me all the way from NYC, but I'm ready to perform a duet any time she's up for it.”

For the release of his first book, Karl the Fog: San Francisco’s Most Mysterious Resident (on sale June 11), we asked the newly published author to tell us about the best places his fans can go to pay their respects. "While you can love (or hate) me from anywhere in San Francisco, these are a few spots that rise above the rest," he says.

1. Mt. Davidson

"If you're looking for my chilly embrace, this is the best place to find me. It's the highest naturally elevated spot in San Francisco, so I chill here a lot. And on a few lucky days of the year, I don't make it to the top so you can stand on the edge and look down at a sea of me."

Golden-Gate-Bridge-fog.jpg?mtime=20190605165359#asset:106028
(From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books)

2. Sutro Bath / Lands End

"Iconic spot to enjoy San Francisco past (Sutro Baths), present (trails around Lands End), and future (me coming in from the Pacific Ocean in about 20 minutes)."

3. Cupid's Arrow / Bay Bridge

"Tony Bennett claims he left his heart in San Francisco, and anyone who stands at Cupid's Arrow and watches me sweep over the Bay Bridge on a Fogust morning could claim the same thing."


Karl-the-Fog-Castro.jpg?mtime=20190605165401#asset:106029
(From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books)

4. Bernal Heights Park

"Excellent location to watch me bubble over the hills of Noe Valley and Twin Peaks and jog toward downtown and Salesforce Tower, my new arch-nemesis."

Karl-the-Fog-Golden-Gate-Bridge.jpg?mtime=20190605165401#asset:106030
(From Karl the Fog, by Karl the Fog, published by Chronicle Books)

5. Mt. Tamalpais

"Wanna get high? Like, really up there? Drive up to the top of Mt. Tam before dusk and plant yourself somewhere with a view. Watch the sun slowly set across the sky into me, creating an ocean of red and purple cotton candy."

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Inspiration

Crazy Delicious Ice Cream Flavors Inspired by Camping Trips

Just in time for National Camping Month (June), one of America’s most unique ice cream shops is rolling out a collection of special flavors to honor the great outdoors and—the cherry on top—benefit the National Park Service at the same time. From now until June 27, in scoop shops from San Diego to Seattle, Portland-based mini-chain Salt & Straw (saltandstraw.com) will be serving up a camping-inspired selection that reimagines summertime eats in ice cream form. And, in keeping with the company’s ethos, there are plenty of unexpected combinations in the mix. Ice Cream Flavors Inspired by the Great Outdoors Riffing on West Coast foraging trips for inspiration, with touchstones like the deserts of Southern California and Washington state’s redwood trees, the series covers a truly wild range of flavors. Can’t get enough of Oregon’s towering pines? Try the Spruce Tips and Huckleberry Crisp, spruce-tip ice cream with huckleberry jam and hazelnut crumble. Or maybe go for the Campfire S’mores, a woodsy chocolate ice cream laced with graham crackers and smoky, toasted marshmallow fluff. That’s co-founder and head ice cream maker Tyler Malek’s personal favorite, and one he predicts will be a big hit with the customers. “It transports you to sitting around a campfire with friends and family,” he says. “We're betting on the classics like Campfire S'mores and Buttermilk Pancakes, Bacon & Eggs to be crowd favorites.” Yep, that’s right. Buttery griddled-pancake ice cream with maple-praline bacon bits and sunny-side caramel, a full breakfast in a single cone. Even more unusual-sounding are the Berries, Beans & BBQ Sauce, which marries dairy-free raspberry ice cream with molasses-rich baked bean ganache and zingy strawberry barbecue sauce, and the Skillet Cornbread with Candied Nettles & Pine Nuts, a savory brown-butter cornbread ice cream with pine nuts and nettle brittle. Taking to the trails? Mushroom Muddy Buddies references that quintessential hiking snack, a pile of peanut butter-and-chocolate-coated Chex, with hazelnuts standing in for the cereal and scattered throughout a candied-mushroom ice cream base. This one “could be a sensation for the more adventurous types,” Tyler says. And what’s a trek without some trail mix? North Coast Foraged Trail Mix channels that old-school vibe, a sea-salt ice cream swirled with tart salal-berry jam and an inspired combination of seaweed, apricots, figs, and nuts. Salt & Straw Ice Cream Is Available by Mail If a trip to the West Coast doesn’t mesh with your immediate travel plans, not to worry—the pints, clad in a classic Pendleton print for extra nostalgia, are also available by mail. And, with Salt & Straw putting a portion of the proceeds toward the parks, you’ll be doing good by treating yourself. “When we dreamed up this series, we all started sharing stories of our collective camping memories, the places, tastes, feeling of gathering around the campfire with friends and family,” Tyler says. “We wanted to celebrate summer and encourage people to get outside, but also remind them that our National Parks need our help more than ever. Our parks are such a treasure and great reminder of what’s most important. We'd like to do our part in supporting them.”

Inspiration

Locals Know Best: Olympia, Washington

Riana Nelson started traveling the world right after graduating from the University of Michigan, thanks to performing on cruise ships and working for Disney in Beijing, China. But when she and her brothers formed Derik Nelson & Family, a trio known for unique three-part harmonies, they began working with the U.S. Department of State as Cultural Ambassadors of the United States and traveled the globe to promote cultural diplomacy through music and arts education. They perform in places like Turkmenistan, Moldova, and Albania to share their music, which blends the driving yet gentle melodies of folk-inflected rock of the 1970s, the familiar rhythms that made Nashville famous, and the contemplative lyrics associated with some of today’s popular indie singer-songwriters, like Sufjan Stevens and Bon Iver. But no matter how far and wide she travels, she loves coming home to Olympia, Washington. The scenic state capital, at the southern end of the Puget Sound, is home to less than 52,000. Its creative energy and the surrounding natural wonders make it a destination for a relaxed weekend—or longer. We checked in with her to learn about her favorite spots to eat, shop, hang out, and just be. Eat Your Heart Out When it comes to sampling Olympia’s flavors, go downtown. Riana is a big fan of the local food truck culture, giving a particular shout-out to Arepa, which serves Venezuelan-style fare like killer plantains and yuca fries with garlic oil dipping sauce. The trucks park in a cluster close to picnic tables, so you can savor the fare while you soak up the city’s vibe. About a block away is Olympia Coffee, which takes java very seriously. She has an artist’s appreciation for the artistry of the baristas here. They ground beans and slow-pour everything to order. But perhaps the most exciting attraction for eating and drinking is the Olympia Farmers Market, a year-round indoor emporium where the region’s freshest flavors have been on display for 45 years. Riana has a few vendors that she regularly visits, like Johnson Berry Farm. “My favorites are the sweet and mellow popular Tayberry or seasonal Little Wild Jake Blackberry jam,” she insists. “But you can also go spicy and savory with their spicy varieties like the XXX spice Blackberry Habenero or Raspberry Chipotle.” In a clever move, they sell carry-on-friendly sizes, so stock up. She also has a special place in her heart for Skipping Stone Garden, a husband-and-wife-owned farm that peddles thoughtfully grown organic vegetables. Down the street is 222 Market, a more modern artisanal food hall in a 1940s-era building that originally housed a car dealership. One of Riana’s favorite stop is Sift and Gather, another husband-and-wife-owned business, this one famous for its gooey sticky buns. Just be sure to heed her warning: the pastries go on sale at 10 a.m. and when they’re gone, that’s it. Better luck tomorrow. Sofie's Scoops is a must for its small-batch gelato. Their imaginative flavors include candied ginger, cardamom, and salty butterscotch. If you’re looking to sit down for something a little fancier, she recommends the Bread Peddler, a refined yet laidback French-inspired bistro with superior local mussels in hard cider sauce. The sister café, also in the market, sells coffee drinks, sandwiches, and pastries until afternoon each day. Get Out Hiking and camping are one of Washington’s most terrific attractions, and outdoorsy types will find that Olympia’s surrounds are among the region’s finest. Take, for instance, the Hoh Rain Forest, one of the largest temperate rain forests in the country. A big reason it stands out, Riana notes, is that it’s the starting point of hiking trails that run through Olympia National Park. Another option for getting out of the city for the day is Ruby Beach, a rugged, rural oasis that’s about a two-hour drive from the city. Riana has mastered the way to enjoy the place: “Walk north along the beach to the mouth of the Hoh River. The seastacks are beautiful!" she says. "Go at low tide, and definitely be mindful of the tide tables or you won’t be able to return to your car if the tide gets too high!” Getting to and from Ruby Beach is part of the fun because along the way you can stop at Kalaloch Lodge, a collection of rustic-chic cabins that overlook the water and you can find rates that hover around $100 in the off-season, but she strongly recommends stopping here even if you’re not planning an overnight because its Creekside Restaurant is an absolute gem. She speaks whimsically about watching the ocean as you tuck into an exquisite dinner made of local products--especially during storm season. It’s one of the greatest perches for storm-watching around. There’s plenty of natural beauty in the city as well. Riana’s go-to for nature walks is Watershed Park, a 1.4-mile loop trail a few minutes from the Capitol Building that she describes as an "urban oasis." You can wander amid native plants, huge maple trees, and a variety of moss and fern species. There are more than 20 bridges and boardwalks that cross over natural springs and the gorgeous Moxlie Creek, so carve out some time to explore. Shop Around Local retailers embody Olympia’s creative, smart indie spirit. Riana is a big fan of Pieces to Peaces, a gift stand in the Farmers Market that sells a assorted styles of adorable handmade headbands (Riana has more than a few), including some for pets. Owner Danielle Hale, who Riana describes as an “incredible, badass mom,” has created something of a mini empire with her accessories, selling them far and wide by mail order. Downtown, Radiance is well worth a visit, not least because it captures the essence of the town’s freewheeling vibe. The fragrant, relaxed shop is stocked with essential oils, natural skincare products, bulk teas, and other holistic-minded goods. Psychic Sisters, which you can find by looking for the neon sigh that reads “The psychic is in,” sells funky gifts and jewelry as well as visions of your future, thanks to the mediums who work there. And, she notes, their second-hand clothing selection is a site to behold: everything is sorted by color. Got kids with you? Make sure to take them to Captain Little, a toys shop with delightful toys, puzzles, games, quirky gifts. And then there’s Browsers, an 80-year-old bookstore where you’re almost guaranteed to lose track of time. Riana loves it for the beautiful bright loft upstairs with spacious work tables and free WiFi, not to mention the Pacific Northwest-inspired postcards and books about the region.

Inspiration

Hotel We Love: CityFlatsHotel, Grand Rapids, Michigan

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Inspiration

Monet in San Francisco: The Best Way to See a Once-in-a-Lifetime Exhibit

Looking for a little culture with your breakfast? For a limited time only, visitors to San Francisco can take part in a special hotel package that includes early exclusive access to Monet: The Late Years, the first exhibition in over 20 years dedicated to the final phase of the artist’s career. Book Through the Stanford Court Hotel Available to book through the Stanford Court Hotel, the Monet in the Morning package includes accommodation, two early bird tickets to the exhibition at the de Young Museum’s Herbst gallery, a Claude Monet Water Lilies eco-tote bag, and breakfast for two. Taking place every weekend in May from 8.30am to 9.30am (before the museum has officially opened to the general public), the morning event is capped at just 150, allowing for a more relaxed and intimate experience of the showcase that attracts thousands of people during regular opening hours. Monet's Late Work, in Focus Focusing on the last years of the painter’s life in Giverny, France in the early 1900s, where he produced dozens of works inspired by the landscape of his five-acre property, the exhibition brings together pieces from museums and galleries all over the world. Visitors can see variations of some of his most beautiful and well-known works, including the famous Water Lilies, Weeping Willow, Rose Garden, and The Japanese Footbridge. The exhibition includes several rooms, and after guests have viewed the works, they can take an elevator to the top of the de Young for a 360-degree view of San Francisco. “Guests can expect an illuminating experience. Monet: The Late Years features almost 50 masterpieces, and this exhibition continues to define the artist’s lasting legacy. In the final years of his prolific career, his experimental and creative energies took artistic liberties that reflected a path toward modernism. After Monet, guests have the rare opportunity to see another French master in Gauguin: A Spiritual Journey as well as the renowned permanent collection of the de Young,” Patrick Buijten, Group and Tourism Manager for de Young Museum told Lonely Planet Travel News. Get inspired to travel everyday by signing up to Lonely Planet's daily newsletter.

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