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  • Prescott, Arizona
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    Prescott,

    Arizona

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    Prescott ( PRESS-kət) is a city in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. According to the 2010 Census, the city's population was 39,843. The city is the county seat of Yavapai County. In 1864, Prescott was designated as the capital of the Arizona Territory, replacing the temporary capital of Fort Whipple. The Territorial Capital was moved to Tucson in 1867. Prescott again became the Territorial Capital in 1877, until Phoenix became the capital in 1889. The towns of Prescott Valley, 7 miles (11 km) east; Chino Valley, 16 miles (26 km) north; Dewey-Humboldt, 13 miles (21 km) east, and Prescott comprise what is locally known as the "Quad-City" area. This also sometimes refers to central Yavapai County in general, which would include the towns of: Mayer, Paulden, Wilhoit, and Williamson Valley. Combined with these smaller communities the area had a population of 103,260 as of 2007. Prescott is the center of the Prescott Metropolitan Area, defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as all of Yavapai County. The Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe reservation is adjacent to and partially within the borders of Prescott. Prescott is in the Granite Creek watershed and contains the convergence of Miller Creek and Granite Creek on its north side.
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    Inspiration

    Memorial Day 2019: 5 Affordable & Authentic Experiences

    Memorial Day weekend (May 25 - 27) serves as the unofficial start of summer. Never mind that the holiday is a few weeks in advance of the June 21 solstice and that many school-age kids face one more month of school. The three-day weekend still provides a taste of summer delights to come. While many folks will spend the weekend grilling, shopping, or hitting up local hot spots, some will choose to hit the road. In fact, AAA predicts that nearly 42 million Americans plan to travel for Memorial Day 2019. Keeping in mind that the purpose of the holiday is to honor those who have given their lives in defense of the United States (its original designation was Decoration Day, dating back to the end of the Civil War, when Americans decorated the graves of those who had given what President Abraham Lincoln famously called "the last full measure of devotion" to their country), the Budget Travel editors have rounded up travel experiences that go well beyond the well-trod tourist path. Here, five exceptionally affordable getaways that are a relatively easy escape from urban areas and that also offer unique history, culture, and natural beauty—plus insider tips for getting the most out of your visit. 1. Portsmouth, New Hampshire New England history and culture in a charming, walkable city Why you’ll love it: Walking the brick sidewalks of Portsmouth, NH, can feel like stepping back into Colonial days, a fitting way to commemorate the holiday. As the third-oldest city in the U.S., the seaport certainly boasts ample history, from hands-on experiences at Strawberry Banke Museum to the Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion to waterside Prescott Park, and the charming North Church. Even some of the eateries here will, in addition to serving you tasty fare, surround you with New England history, including a repurposed ferry terminal that is now now the popular seafood restaurant Old Ferry Landing, and a 19th-century ships chandlery-turned-bistro, Black Trumpet. Insider tip: Seek out Riverrun Books (32 Daniel Street), an exceptionally inspiring and well-stocked independent bookstore that regularly hosts author readings and other events. Memorial Day weekend festivities: See—and smell!—the Lilac Festival at the historic Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion the morning of May 25. An easy escape from: Boston (a one-hour drive), Providence (less than a two-hour drive), or Hartford, CT (less than a two-and-a-half-hour drive). Why it’s a bargain: Hotels from $121; Airbnb for two from $65. 2. Beacon, New York Artisans and makers in the Hudson River Valley Why you’ll love it: Whether you arrive in town via car or train, the sweeping views of the Hudson River will be your first glimpse of what Beacon has to offer. Before departing the waterfront for Main Street’s unique shops and food, you must experience the Dia:Beacon museum with its world-class collection of modern and contemporary art by masters such as painter/sculptor Frank Stella and "light-sculptor" Dan Flavin. Grab a pint at Hudson Valley Brewery before (or after) you make your way up the town’s main thoroughfare (Beacon’s Main Street literally ascends a gentle hill) to admire the work of local artists and “makers” who have transformed Beacon’s centuries-old manufacturing legacy into a decidedly chic, imaginative contemporary scene. No chain stores or outlets here, just one-of-a-kind and often surprising hand-crafted gifts and food, including the knitters at Loopy Mango boutique, the baking geniuses at Glazed Over Donuts, the mixologists at the Roundhouse, and an array of other shops and eateries. Keep an eye out for painter Rick Price’s murals on the exterior of the public library and both the exterior and interior of Tito Santana Taqueria (yum!). Beacon is also a stone’s throw (well, a short drive) from other Hudson River Valley hot spots such as Minnewaska State Park across the river in Ulster County, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park. It's no wonder that Beacon earned the title "Coolest Small Town in America 2018." Insider tip: Zora Dora Micro Batch’s low-key exterior on Main Street is the gateway to incredible handcrafted gourmet paletas (popsicles), offering an evolving array of flavors including a mind-blowingly delicious pineapple, sea salt, and red pepper paleta you must taste to believe. Zora Dora earned a spot on Budget Travel’s list of the best ice cream shops in the U.S. Memorial Day weekend festivities: The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, in nearby Hyde Park, will host commemorative events all weekend long, including an exhibition devoted to the 75th anniversary of the June 6, 1944, D-Day invasion. Easy escape from: New York City (about a 90-minute drive; 90-minute train ride from Grand Central Terminal, with adult fares starting at $35 round-trip for an off-peak ticket bought at the station—it’ll cost you a few dollars more if you buy your ticket on the train) or Albany, NY (about a 90-minute drive). Why it’s a bargain: Hotels in neighboring communities from $79; Airbnb for two in Beacon from $67. 3. Orange Beach, Alabama A Gulf Shore beach town that also offers wild escapes A visit to Orange Beach (and its neighbor Gulf Shores) allows travelers to essentially enjoy two long weekends in one: The first vacation consists of the justly popular attractions that have been drawing Southerners here for generations, including the 30+ miles of Gulf of Mexico waterfront along the coast of what locals refer to as “Pleasure Island” with white-sand beaches, waterparks, zip lines, and fishing. The second vacation—which you can enjoy at exactly the same time—consists of a lesser-known and decidedly wilder side of the Gulf Coast, including the Backcountry Trail through Gulf State Park, 25 miles of trails ideal for cycling, running, or just strolling; and Graham Creek Nature Preserve in nearby Foley, boasting nearly 500 acres of habitat for kayaking or canoeing. And, this being the Gulf Coast, you’ll have access to fresh seafood favorites like shrimp and grits and a variety of platters that have kept travelers returning to Orange Beach and its neighboring communities for years. Insider tip: Go beyond the beach with a half-hour drive west to Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge for kayaking and canoeing amidst migratory songbirds and sea turtles, and sign up for one of the excellent educational guided tours. (Important: Locals gently remind you to pack insect repellent and sunscreen and sun-protective clothing to ensure a comfortable and safe adventure in Bon Secour.) Memorial Day weekend festivities: Run in the Paradise Island 5K on May 26, hear country star Thomas Rhett at the Wharf Amphitheater on May 26, and “ooh” and “aah” at the fireworks at Sparks After Dark at the Wharf the evening of May 27. An easy escape from: Mobile (about a one-hour drive) or New Orleans (about a three-hour drive). Why it’s a bargain: Hotels under $200; Airbnb rentals for two from $111. 4. Rapid City, South Dakota A vibrant urban community in the midst of the Wild West Why you’ll love it: While South Dakota is renowned for wild spaces such as Badlands National Park and Custer State Park and for jaw-dropping feats of monument carving at Mount Rushmore and Crazy Horse Monument, many U.S. travelers don’t realize that Rapid City, nicknamed the “Gateway to the Black Hills,” can serve not only as a home base for exploring those famous spots but also as a vibrant urban destination in its own right, home to a variety of live music venues and arts and cultural institutions and festivals. Spend some time on the charming town square, drop by The Journey Museum & Learning Center for interactive exhibits, the Dahl Arts Center for cultural exhibits and free “art adventures," and get up close and personal with Rapid City’s ancient past at APEX Gallery, on the campus of South Dakota School of Mining & Technology, with its fine collection of fossils and minerals. And, of course, you shouldn’t miss the aforementioned wild spaces and monuments, which can all be happily squeezed into your three-day weekend in Rapid City: Mount Rushmore is about a half-hour drive, Crazy Horse Monument is less than an hour, Custer State Park is about a half-hour, and Badlands is less than an hour. Insider tip: Off the city’s main square, look for Art Alley, an informal community art gallery with cool murals devoted to the region’s history and culture. Memorial Day weekend festivities: Visit the May 25 - 27 open house at the Crazy Horse Monument to honor veterans and those who gave their lives in defense of the U.S. An easy escape from: Minneapolis (a 90-minute flight from under $300 round trip) or Chicago (a two-and-a-half-hour flight for under $350); Rapid City is not an easy driving distance from any major urban area. Why it’s a bargain: Hotels from well under $100; Airbnb for two from well under $100. 5. Morro Bay, California A genuine fishing village that welcomes newbies like family Why you’ll love it: Morro Bay is first and foremost an authentic seaside community on the central coast of California. While it’s been a popular vacation spot for central coast residents for generations, the town has managed not to evolve into what experienced travelers would diplomatically refer to as “a little touristy.” We’d love to encourage discerning weekenders from the Bay Area and Southern California (and beyond) to discover Morro Bay’s welcoming locals and under-the-radar delights while appreciating its authenticity. Morro Bay will happily accommodate a variety of travel tastes: Want to chill on a beach and do practically nothing? There’s a beach for that. Want to learn to surf? Lessons are available. How about exploring a gorgeous lesser-known state park, kayaking the town’s eponymous bay, or pedaling your family in a rented surrey around the charming downtown? Gear rentals are an easy walk from comfortable lodging such as the Landing at Morro Bay (with views of the bay and iconic Morro Rock from many rooms) and the super-fresh seafood at Tognazzini’s Dockside Restaurant (stop by the fish market behind the restaurant for Instagrammable tableaus). Insider tip: The immensely delicious breakfast burritos at Frankie & Lola’s combine an old-timey diner aesthetic with Mexican chorizo and cheese and are so big they can serve as both an ample morning meal and a hearty snack or lunch whilst exploring the coast. Memorial Day weekend festivities: Visit Art in the Park, May 25 - 27, at Morro Bay Boulevard and Harbor Street. An easy escape from: San Jose (about a three-hour drive) or Los Angeles (about a three-and-a-half-hour drive); the fact that Morro Bay is not a super-short drive from any major urban area is part of what makes it Morro Bay. Why it’s a steal: Hotels under $150, some starting under $100; Airbnb rentals for two from $79. (All lodging estimates were accurate when we published this story, but as Memorial Day gets closer, hotel rates and Airbnb inventory will likely change.)For travel inspiration, know-how, deals, and more, sign up for Budget Travel's free e-newsletter.

    Budget Travel Lists

    20 Best Bang-for-Your-Buck Vacation Rental Destinations

    Here at Budget Travel, we appreciate a deal as much as the next frugal traveler, but for our purposes, budget doesn’t necessarily translate as cheap. To do the mental math on what, exactly, qualifies as a good-value proposition, we take into account tangible factors like location, weather, and experiences to have along the way. But we also think about the intangibles—less quantifiable, more subjective elements like uniqueness and Instagrammability. It’s a complicated equation, but home-share rental site Vrbo (vrbo.com) is attempting to simplify things a bit, courtesy of its first-ever Bang for Your Buck Index. The company recently released a list of domestic and international destinations that provide travelers with the best value, based on last year’s booking data. Factoring in considerations like proximity to the beach, diversity of dining options, and the array of activities on offer, here's where you'll get the most for your money—all for $250 per night or less. Top 10 Domestic Destinations for Rental Value With an abundance of beaches—not to mention its collection of theme parks—it’s no wonder Florida claims five of the 10 spots on Vrbo’s domestic list. Daytona Beach, Cocoa Beach, and Cape Canaveral offer prime opportunities to work on that tan, while Orlando is the gateway to Disney World and Universal Studios’ Wizarding World of Harry Potter. For a break from the ocean, book a trip to Lakeland, east of Tampa, to explore the city’s eponymous lakes, or venture out of state and head west instead: Tucson and Prescott, Arizona, both cracked the top 10, as did Moab, Utah, in the heart of canyon country. Looking for something a little less expected? Branson, Missouri, receives surprisingly high marks, while family favorite Myrtle Beach rounds out the list. Overseas Bargains If, in your mind, it doesn’t count as vacation unless you've stepped off a plane onto foreign soil, not to fear—there’s plenty of value to be had in Europe, Asia, Canada, and the Caribbean, as long as you know where to look. For a truly economical experience, forgo hotspots like London, Paris, and Rome in favor of the Iberian peninsula: Porto, Lisbon, Madrid, and Seville all provide warm weather, great food, and arts and culture galore, minus the sticker shock of their higher-profile European peers. (On the continent, Prague and Berlin are also good bets.) Chasing those sunny days? You can’t go wrong with Puerto Rico, and Carolina is Vrbo’s pick for the island’s best-value destination. Up north, Calgary and Halifax offer boundless natural splendor and cultural institutions in profusion, plus a favorable exchange rate to boot. And on the other side of the world, Tokyo is an unexpectedly budget-friendly gem.

    Inspiration

    America's Most Beautiful Sunsets (Plus Deals to Get You There!)

    Want to check out these amazing sunsets in person? Here are deals to get you to all of them: Maui, HI How does six nights at the Ka'anapali Beach Hotel sound? Delta Vacations puts you right on the beach, including airfare, six nights, and hotel taxes for around $1,200 (depending on where you're flying from). Bradshaw Mountains, AZ Spend some time exploring Arizona with an Expedia deal that includes airfare and five nights, usually for less than $700! The stunning Bradshaw Mountains are in Prescott National Forest, about a two-hour drive northwest of Phoenix. Virginia Hunt Country The Marriott Ranch, in Hume, Virginia, is about 50 miles outside Washington, D.C., but is a decidedly rural environment. You can book day trips, including a "City Slickers" ranch experience, "Twilight Dinner Rides," and a four-night "Western Vacation Package (including all riding equipment) for under $700. Texas Hill Country You can book a flight and three nights in Austin via Expedia, usually for under $500, and explore Hill Country must-sees like Fredericksburg (about a 90-minute drive due west), with its thriving wineries, inns, and restaurants. Sault Ste. Marie, MI The gorgeous sunsets behind freighters in the Soo Locks here are an unlikely pair, but it's all part of the spectacular landscape to be found around Lake Superior, the largest body of fresh water on earth. Fly into Minneapolis (typically under $400 on U.S. Airways from New York) and explore the lakeshore, including Minnesota, Michigan, and Ontario, at your own pace in a rental car. California Wine Country From the sunny valleys to the mist-shrouded mountains, the warm days the cool nights, the climate in Northern California isn't just ideal for growing grapes but for the perfect romantic getaway as well! Gate 1 Travel offers package deals that include airfare, hotel, and car rental in San Francisco and wine country, often for less than $800! See our readers' best photos of sunsets around the world!

    Inspiration

    Jazz festivals roundup

    Budget Travel Online recently asked Patricia Myers, a Scottsdale, Ariz.-based journalist, to highlight a handful of this summer's jazz festivals. Myers--who specializes in writing about travel, food, and the arts for Allaboutjazz.com and other publications--suggested the following picks. Aug. 24-26, Prescott Jazz Summit, Prescott, Ariz.: This festival runs Friday through Sunday and features blues, jazz, and swing from national musicians, with a portion of the proceeds going to local music programs. Headliners include Bud Shank, Bob Florence, Carl Saunders, Mike Vax, Scott Whitfield, Margo Reed, Joel Robin, Blaise Lantana, Dwight Kilian, Tony Vacca, Jack Peterson, Bob Lashier, Les Czimber, and Cleve Huff. You'll pay $70 per person for a weekend pass, or $25 for each concert; $100 per person to attend a "Meet Musicians" dinner, plus a Friday-night concert; or $40 per person for a jazz brunch. Learn more at prescottjazz.com. Sept. 21-23, 50th annual Monterey (Calif.) Jazz Festival: Sonny Rollins, Ornette Coleman, Diana Krall, Dave Brubeck, Jim Hall, Gerald Wilson Orchestra, Terence Blanchard, Dave Holland-Gonzalo Rubalcaba-Chris Potter, Jim Hall-Kenny Burrell, Cyrus Chestnut, All-Star Band (James Moody, Nnenna Freelon, Terence Blanchard, Benny Green), Hammond B3 Blowout with Joey DeFrancesco Trio and Atsuko Hashimoto Trio (with Houston Person and Jeff Hamilton). Learn more at montereyjazzfestival.com. Sept. 25-30, The 26th Annual Sedona (Calif.) Jazz on the Rocks Festival: -- Sept.25, Catch a screening of the film Anita O'Day, The Life of a Jazz Singer, $10 per person to see the film, which starts at 7 p.m.; dinner-and-a-film combo costs $45 per person; dinner starts at 5:15 p.m. -- Sept.26, 3-6 p.m. JOR Youth Band concert and 6-p.m. jam session with youth and local musicians, free. -- Sept.27, Jazz Circle Party featuring vocalist Sandra Booker-pianist Billy Mitchell, $100 per person. -- Sept.28, New Orleans vocalist Kim Provost-guitarist Bill Solley lead "Kids Who Love Jazz" clinics, also Booker-Mitchell jazz history clinic and performance. Plus, a music industry Q&A; with Larry Gittens, all free; also, at 5 and 7:30 p.m., concerts with Brice Winston-tenor sax plus New Orleans musicians, $50 per person. Other options include a "wine and jazz dinner" with the Charlie Foldesh Combo, $100 per person; also 9-11 p.m. jam session, $20 per person. -- Sept.29, all-day outdoor festival at Radisson Poco Diablo Resort: Mose Allison (piano and vocals; see photo at left), Stanley Jordan (guitar), Sandra Booker (vocals) with Billy Mitchell (piano), Larry Gittens (smooth trumpet); 8-11 p.m. jam session ($20 per person). -- Sept. 30, Brunch with jazz duo Kim Prevost and Bill Solley (Learn more about these successful musicians here, $80 per person. Also, clinics will be offered in the afternoon in finger-style guitar and percussion/rhythm, for $40 per person. Learn more at sedonajazz.com.

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    DESTINATION IN Arizona

    Jerome

    Jerome is a town in the Black Hills of Yavapai County in the U.S. state of Arizona. Founded in the late 19th century on Cleopatra Hill overlooking the Verde Valley, Jerome is located more than 5,000 feet (1,500 m) above sea level. It is about 100 miles (160 km) north of Phoenix along State Route 89A between Sedona and Prescott. Supported in its heyday by rich copper mines, it was home to more than 10,000 people in the 1920s. As of the 2010 census, its population was 444. It is now known for its tourist attractions, such as its "ghost town" status and local wineries.The town owes its existence mainly to two ore bodies that formed about 1.75 billion years ago along a ring fault in the caldera of an undersea volcano. Tectonic plate movements, plate collisions, uplift, deposition, erosion, and other geologic processes eventually exposed the tip of one of the ore bodies and pushed the other close to the surface, both near Jerome. In the late 19th century, the United Verde Mine, developed by William A. Clark, extracted ore bearing copper, gold, silver, and other metals from the larger of the two. The United Verde Extension UVX Mine, owned by James Douglas Jr., depended on the other huge deposit. In total, the copper deposits discovered in the vicinity of Jerome were among the richest ever found. Jerome made news in 1917 when labor unrest involving the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) led to the expulsion at gunpoint of about 60 IWW members, who were loaded on a cattle car and shipped west. Production at the mines, always subject to fluctuations, boomed during World War I, fell thereafter, rose again, then fell again during and after the Great Depression. As the ore deposits ran out, the mines closed for good in 1953, and the population dwindled to fewer than 100. Efforts to save the town from oblivion succeeded when residents turned to tourism and retail sales. Jerome became a National Historic Landmark in 1967. By the early 21st century, Jerome had art galleries, coffee houses, restaurants, a state park, and a local museum devoted to mining history.

    DESTINATION IN Arizona

    Flagstaff

    Flagstaff is a city in, and the county seat of, Coconino County in northern Arizona, in the southwestern United States. In 2019, the city's estimated population was 75,038. Flagstaff's combined metropolitan area has an estimated population of 139,097. Flagstaff lies near the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau and within the San Francisco volcanic field, along the western side of the largest contiguous ponderosa pine forest in the continental United States. The city sits at around 7,000 feet (2,100 m) and is next to Mount Elden, just south of the San Francisco Peaks, the highest mountain range in the state of Arizona. Humphreys Peak, the highest point in Arizona at 12,633 feet (3,851 m), is about 10 miles (16 km) north of Flagstaff in Kachina Peaks Wilderness. The geology of the Flagstaff area includes exposed rock from the Mesozoic and Paleozoic eras, with Moenkopi Formation red sandstone having once been quarried in the city; many of the historic downtown buildings were constructed with it. The Rio de Flag river runs through the city. Originally settled by the pre-Columbian native Sinagua people, the area of Flagstaff has fertile land from volcanic ash after eruptions in the 11th century. It was first settled as the present-day city in 1876. Local businessmen lobbied for Route 66 to pass through the city, which it did, turning the local industry from lumber to tourism and developing downtown Flagstaff. In 1930, Pluto was discovered from Flagstaff. The city developed further through to the end of the 1960s, with various observatories also used to choose Moon landing sites for the Apollo missions. Through the 1970s and 1980s, downtown fell into disrepair, but was revitalized with a major cultural heritage project in the 1990s. The city remains an important distribution hub for companies such as Nestlé Purina PetCare, and is home to the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, the United States Geological Survey Flagstaff Station, and Northern Arizona University. Flagstaff has a strong tourism sector, due to its proximity to Grand Canyon National Park, Oak Creek Canyon, the Arizona Snowbowl, Meteor Crater, and Historic Route 66.