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    South Shore,

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    The South Shore Line (reporting mark NICD) is an electrically powered interurban commuter rail line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Millennium Station in downtown Chicago and the South Bend International Airport in South Bend, Indiana, United States. The name refers to both the physical line and the service operated over that route. The line was built in 1901–1908 by predecessors of the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad, which continues to operate freight service. Passenger operation was assumed by the NICTD in 1989. The South Shore Line is one of the last surviving interurban trains in the United States.
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    Inspiration

    A guide to each of the Hawaiian Islands

    Are you still having that dream about Hawaii? The one where you’re at the beach sipping a Mai Tai? Hawaii is a rich and beautiful place with unique nuances between each island. Read more for a breakdown of what makes each island special, what the individual policies are for COVID and safe travel, and other essential things to keep in mind when picking your destination. Kaua'i Island Known for: Kaua'i is also known as "The Garden Isle" because of the tropical rainforest blanketing most of the land. Kaua'i is small at just 25 miles long and 33 miles wide, with roughly 77,000 locals, but represents the land of discovery for Hawaiian culture and the spirit of aloha. The iconic island scenery appears as the backdrop to several movies, including Jurassic Park, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Blue Hawaii, and Lilo & Stitch. "The oldest and northernmost island in the Hawaiian chain is draped in emerald valleys, sharp mountain spires, and jagged cliffs aged by time and the elements. Centuries of growth have formed tropical rainforests, forking rivers, and cascading waterfalls! Some parts of Kauai are only accessible by sea or air, revealing views beyond your imagination." COVID policies & restrictions: The county of Kaua'i manages its own inter-county travel quarantine processes due to its at-risk population. Transpacific travelers are still exempt from a 10-day quarantine if they receive an approved, negative test result within 72 hours of arrival. No tests are available when you arrive. Travelers may also start the Kaua'i Resort Bubble Program, where you are required to wear a wrist tracking device and stay within resort bounds. Within, you can explore and relax freely. Masks are required. Things to do: Kaua'i is full of small towns like Hanapepe and Koloa, where visitors can taste local cuisine and culture. Because of some exclusive access points, it's a great destination for water activities and sky tours like kayaking the Wailua River or ziplining across the valleys. Other activities include snorkeling, horseback riding, and hiking. Things to note: Most of the Kaua'i hiking trails require a permit. To obtain, call the State Parks Office at (808)-274-3444. To learn more about Kaua'i trails, go to their website. Major regions: North Shore (Princeville), East Side (Coconut Coast), Lihue (Kalapaki), South Shore (Poipu), West Side (Waimea). Airport: Lihue Airport, LIH with services from Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, Southwest Airlines, and United Airlines Oahu Island courtesy of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority Oahu Island Known for: The heart of Hawaii is also known as "The Gathering Place," which is home to the capital city of Honolulu and the majority of Hawaii's diverse population. This melting pot fuses cultures from the East and West with the values and traditions of Native Hawaii. Oahu is the third-largest island with world-famous surf, Waikiki beach, historic China Town, and Pearl Harbor. "It's this fundamental contrast between the ancient and the modern that makes discovering Oahu — from bustling city life to laidback surf towns — so enjoyable. Oahu, the child of Papa and Lua according to one tradition, is honored in this chant composed by Kumu Hula Manu Boyd and performed by Kumu Hula Snowbird Bento." COVID Policies & Restrictions: The standard COVID policies apply. You must have a negative COVID test before departure and enroll in all the necessary platforms. Things to do: Oahu's bustling from Honolulu's affluent culture where you can dine at farm-to-table restaurants, visit historic destinations, experience hula. Beyond learning to surf, you can explore the ocean by taking a group outrigger canoe ride off Waikiki Beach. Things to note: Oahu is the most affordable island for travelers. The competitive prices offer up the ideal budget vacation between the abundance of hotels, activities, city life, and attractions. Major regions: North Shore, Honolulu, Central Oahu, Windward Coast, Leeward Coast Airport: Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, HNL. Also known as the Honolulu International airport. Molokai Island courtesy of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority Molokai Island Known for: Hawaii's fifth-largest island is only 38 miles long and 10 miles across its widest point, making it easily accessible by foot, bike, or car. The highest sea cliffs in the world populate the island and the longest continuous reef. The majority of Molokai's population preserves the island roots of rural lifestyles. "Whether you're led by a guide along the cliffs leading to Kalaupapa National Historical Park or discovering Papohaku Beach, one of Hawaii's largest white-sand beaches, Molokai is truly an island of outdoor adventure where Hawaii's past comes alive!" COVID policies & restrictions: Molokai Island is part of Maui County and follows the safety protocols of Maui. Things to do: The best thing to do in Molokai is to explore the deep jungles, cathedral valleys, beaches, and one of the most remote settlements in the world. The ancient Halawa Valley features one of Hawaii's most iconic landscapes. Anglers and divers celebrate Molokai for its diverse underwater landscapes. Things to note: This island is considered the "getaway" for inter-island travelers, with some of the most deserted beaches among the Hawaiian islands. Major regions: West End, Central Molokai, East End Airport: Hoolehua Airport, MKK. Mokulele Airlines services inter-island flights from Oahu or Maui. Lanai Island courtesy of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority Lanai Island Known for: This is the smallest inhabited island open for travelers to Hawaii. Located only nine miles away from Maui, yet it feels like a whole other world. Visitors can indulge at luxurious resorts or take a 4-wheel-drive to explore hidden treasures. Lanai is known for its serenity, adventure, and privacy. "Take the rocky road to Kaiolohia (Shipwreck Beach) for dazzling views of Molokai and Maui, go horseback riding amid lush valleys and ironwood forests near Lanai City, amble the Munro Trail through the lush rainforest to Lanai's highest point at 3,370 feet—the opportunities for adventure on Lanai are endless." COVID policies & restrictions: Lanai Island is part of Maui County and follows the safety protocols of Maui. Things to do: There are 400 miles of dirt roads, hiking trails, and 18 miles of secluded beaches. With that, the world is yours. You can hike, explore the parks and gardens, ride horses, go clay shooting or enjoy an archery adventure. Get on the water at sunset for a romantic boat ride or go whale watching. Things to note: Some of the best whale watching can happen in the ocean channels between Lanai, Maui, and Molokai when humpback whales travel to Hawaii in winter and spring. There are only a few ways to get here, and it's from another island. Major regions: North Lanai, Central Lanai, South Lanai Airport: Lanai Airport, LNY. Local flights services inter-island travelers from either Oahu or Maui. Maui Island courtesy of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority Maui Island Known for: Maui is the second-largest island in Hawaii and is affectionately called "The Valley Isle." The island is loved for its world-famous beaches, the sacred Iao Valley, and the magnificent sunrise and sunset from Haleakala. Haleakala National Park encompasses the island's tallest peak, volcanic Haleakala. "It's not surprising Maui has been voted "Best Island in the U.S." by Condé Nast Traveler readers for more than 20 years." COVID policies & restrictions: On top of the Hawai'i Safe travels program Maui posted its new Public Health Emergency Rules. As of April 9, trans-Pacific travelers who arrive with a negative COVID-19 test result may also be required to take a second COVID-19 test, which would be administered and paid for by Maui County. Things to do: Whether you choose the spa route or the adventure route, there is a lot to do. Choose from 14 courses (several of which are ranked at or near the top of the "world's best" lists). One local tourist spot is the Haleakala Ecotours, an authorized concessionaire for Haleakala National Park. The scenic Hana Highway can take you all along the island's 30 miles of beaches, including golden-crescent Kapalua, sheltered from strong currents by lava-rock promontories. Major regions: Maui comprises five regions known as West Maui, Central Maui, South Maui, Upcountry, and East Maui. Airport: Kahului Aiport, OGG or the regional, private airport Kapula Aiport, JHM on the west side of the island. The Big Island courtesy of the Hawaiian Tourism Authority Island of Hawaii Known for: “The Big Island,”' is the largest and the youngest in the Hawaiian chain. It's nearly twice the size of all the other islands combined with four different climate zones, including a polar tundra resulting from the shielding effects of its massive volcanoes. "The island of Hawaii is an unrivaled expression of the power of nature. However you decide to experience the island, it is sure to leave you humbled!" COVID policies & restrictions: Both inter-island travelers and transpacific are expected to either quarantine for ten days, get a quarantine exemption, or take a pre-test within 72 hours of arrival. Things to do: Travelers can ride horses along waterfalls trails or explore the Hawaii Volcanoes National park, which offers plenty of hiking trails like the Nahuku (Thurston Lava Tube) or the Devastation Trail. You can stargaze on the mountain tops, tour a coffee farm, or hang out on the beach. There's more beach here than any of the other islands. You can even go on a Manta Ray dive at night. Things to note: Make sure you read up on safe hiking practices on the island trails. Some can be pretty difficult or unsafe. Don't hike alone and tell someone where you are going. Don't drink any of the water on the trails or wade in with open cuts. For more information, go here. Major regions: Kohala, Hamakua Coast, Hilo, Puna, Kohala, Kona, Kau Airport: Kona International Airport, KOA.

    Inspiration

    4 reasons why you should travel to the Bahamas this winter

    Hurricane Dorian was the worst tropical storm to strike the Bahamas in the country's history. The effects of the storm, from severe wind damage to flooding, left scars on the archipelago that will take years to heal, but the Bahamas is on the rebound and ready to see visitors again. Traveling to the Bahamas this winter is not only more affordable than usual, but visiting this season also directly helps a community working hard to resume life after Hurricane Dorian’s devastating destruction. Here are the top four reasons you should visit this Caribbean archipelago this winter. 1. You can give back on Grand Bahama Hurricane Dorian caused catastrophic damage on Grand Bahama, but today the island is largely up and running and ready to accept visitors. Grand Bahamas is a great destination for travelers who want to give back. The dog- and cat-loving world rallied around the Humane Society of Grand Bahama during and after Hurricane Dorian. Six shelter workers and one volunteer rode out the storm inside the shelter until it flooded and their own lives were put in danger (they had to swim out to safety). But by staying so long, they saved the lives of many animals who would have otherwise perished (sadly, many still did). The animal shelter itself was severely damaged, but thanks to a global fundraising effort is slowing start to re-build. They are happy for volunteer help with the animals — you can take a dog or two for an outing or socialize at the shelter with the cats. The shelter welcomes volunteers 11am-2pm Monday to Saturday. Many of the shelter’s staff lost everything in the storm, and donations of new or lightly used clothing are also welcome. How to get there: The airport in Freeport has re-opened and there are flights on BahamasAir and Silver Airways to and from Fort Lauderdale most days of the week. The ferry between Freeport and Fort Lauderdale is also operating again, as is the cruise port. Many of the hotels and restaurants have opened their doors again. Where to stay: Many of Grand Bahama’s hotels have re-opened, including the all-inclusive Viva Wyndham Fortuna, which saw major renovations post Dorian. Rates are also down about 25% and the property is located on a pretty stretch of sand on the island’s south shore. Other lodging options include Pelican Bay, Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan, Bell Channel Inn and Castaways Best Western. 2. Experience Bimini blue on a budget As a result of the hurricane, hotel prices across the islands have fallen in an effort to draw in visitors. As such, now is a great time to visit some of the more traditionally expensive Out Islands, like beautiful Bimini. The water around Bimini is so well known, it has its own color named after it: Bimini blue. It's the kind of place where life still moves slowly and locals get around by golf cart. Bimini was also once a favorite retreat for Ernest Hemingway, who came to write and indulge in his other passion, sport fishing, which is something else Bimini is known for. How to get there: Bimini is the closest Bahamas island to the mainland US and is easy to access from Miami via airplane or a high-speed ferry service that makes the trip in just two hours. If you fly, you’ll arrive on South Bimini. Most of the accommodation is on North Bimini, which is just a short ferry ride away. Where to eat: At the end of the day head to the Bimini Big Game Club Resort & Marina for a cold beer and fish sandwich at Sharky’s Bar & Grill. Located right by the pier overlooking the marina and the bonefish flats beyond, you can often see massive bull sharks swimming in the water just in front of the restaurant. You can also stay here, although the resort is definitely geared towards anglers. Where to stay: Here you’ll find the Hilton at Resorts World Bimini is the island’s only large resort and offers some great deals, especially if you stay mid-week when the vibe is much more laidback anyway. On the weekends the property has a party vibe when Floridians pop over on the ferry from Miami. The resort features luxe suites with floor-to-ceiling windows and amenities like a rooftop swimming pool, live action casino and 10 restaurants, bars and cafes. The property can also arrange day trips that include snorkeling in and around a partially submerged shipwreck (an old rum runner known as the SS Sapona). 3. Nassau is easy to get to Nassau is the capital of the Bahamas and actually located on New Providence Island, but everyone seems to refer to the area as Nassau. At first glance, with its throngs of cruise ship passengers, careening jitneys and vendors selling straw-goods, Nassau might not be the Caribbean escape many are looking for. But that urban bustle is exactly why we love it: it's been been a hustler hideout since 18th-century pirates were dropping their doubloons on rum and excitement. If you're looking for a classic Bahamian beach, look no further than Cable Beach, just three miles from downtown Nassau. How to get there: Nassau is the easiest island in the Bahamas to access from the mainland US with direct flights on multiple airlines. Outbound US travelers get to clear US Customs and Immigration on the ground in Nassau, which eliminates having to go through customs and border control in their arrival city. Where to stay: If you’re looking for an all-inclusive property with good food on a lovely stretch of white sand on Cable Beach then check into the Melia Nassau Beach - All Inclusive. Part of the Baha Mar development, the resort has ocean facing rooms and suites to choose from as well as 7 restaurants and 4 bars onsite. 4. Cat Island is still pristine, undeveloped Bahamas As an antidote to the hubub of Nassau, Cat Island sits in the Caribbean relatively untouched by tourism. Another of the Bahamas' Out Islands, Cat Island, located some 130 miles southeast of Nassau, is still mostly undeveloped and known as one of the more budget-friendly islands. Derelict plantation ruins dot the islands, and the Hermitage atop Mt Alvernia forms the main historic site. Elsewhere, beaches are blissfully free of big-name resorts. How to get there: There are two airports on Cat Island, Arthur's Town Airport and New Bight Airport, which serve chartered and scheduled flights. There is also a mailboat service from Nassau to points around the island but it only runs weekly. Where to stay: Check out the Pigeon Cay Beach Club, which has just 11 cottages right on a gorgeous three mile long white sand beach and a shabby chic hippie vibe. It isn’t fancy, but they do have WiFi now. Breakfast and dinner are served at the honor bar and you can also cook in your cottage’s kitchen. Explore the island by bike, canoe or kayak, which are all on offer to guests.

    Inspiration

    Get a Taste of Nova Scotia's South Shore Lobster Crawl

    It’s barely 9:00 in the morning, and I’m already worried about losing a toe. Possibly three. I’m on a lobster boat off the coast of West Berlin, Nova Scotia, Canada, and my weather app says it’s in the low 20s—which doesn’t sound so bad, until you factor in the bone-chilling winds coming off the North Atlantic. Those gusts are no joke. The view from the stern. (Maya Stanton) If we'd started earlier, it would’ve been even colder, the locals nonchalantly told me. But even now, with the sun beaming down, the fishing crew is bundled from head to toe in heavy-duty gear: thick, waterproof coats and pants, substantial boots, insulated gloves, hats, hoods, and, on the men, full beards. I, on the other hand, thought my thickest pair of socks would make up for a decidedly non-winterized pair of boots. I was mistaken. As it turns out, lobster is expensive for good reason. In this corner of southwestern Nova Scotia, the fishing season runs from the last Monday in November through the end of May, but it peaks in the winter months, the frigid Atlantic providing the ideal environment for North American lobsters. The boats don’t go out every day, especially in January and February—sometimes the winds are prohibitive, sometimes it’s just way too cold—but when they do, it’s tough work. The payoff is worth it, though: Catches in this fishing sector account for some 40 percent of Canada’s annual lobster haul. And now travelers can be there to take it all in. Currently in its second year, Nova Scotia’s South Shore Lobster Crawl (lobstercrawl.ca) invites the hardy to brave the February elements for three weeks of activities, events, and, of course, good eating up and down the coast—everything from concerts and crafts to art and sculpture shows to a beer festival and a lobster-roll contest—all in the name of that sweet, sweet lobster meat. Day 1: Peggy's Cove, Lunenburg, and Summerville My journey started in Halifax, the province’s capital. I had come to join the crawl—to lean into winter, if you will. We set off on Route 3, aka the Lighthouse Route, a winding, seaside drive that took us first to Peggy’s Cove, a picturesque fishing hamlet on St. Margaret’s Bay, some 25 miles southwest of the city. It’s one of the country’s most photographed spots, thanks in no small part to its iconic lighthouse, built in 1914 and not showing its age in the slightest. The icy shoals and brightly colored boats of Peggy's Cove. (Maya Stanton) The winds were vicious out on the point, but the weathered wooden fishing shacks and vibrantly colored boats and hillside homes were none the worse for wear. Requisite photos acquired, we headed to Lunenburg: a colorful port town with a colorful history, some 60 miles further south on the Lighthouse Route. Established in 1753 and forged on the back of the Atlantic cod–fishing industry, not to mention ship-building and rum-running, Old Town Lunenburg was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995, when the organization declared it “the best surviving example of a planned British colonial settlement in North America." And with its mix of stunning 18th-century Victorians, wooden churches, and Cape Cod-style homes, it’s clear that preservation takes priority here. Lunenburg's oldest house, built around 1753. (Maya Stanton) Snow was beginning to fall when we met our guide for a walking tour (lunenburgwalkingtours.com). We checked out the oldest house in Lunenburg, a navy Cape Cod dating to the town’s founding in 1753. It's such a living museum that there are plexiglass-covered cutouts in the walls to show off the building's rough-cut, hand-hewn timber construction. Also on the agenda: a pale pink Victorian that featured in a 1973 horror flick starring a young Ron Howard, and a circa-1753 Anglican church that was painstakingly reconstructed, beam by original beam, to the tune of $6.7 million after a gut-wrenching fire in 2001. From there, it was a quick jaunt down to the working waterfront, where scallop draggers and deep-sea fishing boats ply their trade. As flurries continued to fall, we made our way to the Grand Banker Bar & Grill (grandbanker.com), a small dining room with a menu overflowing with local seafood and floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the sparkling bay. The Grand Banker's Lunenburger. (Maya Stanton) I tried a rich and tangy Acadian-style Cajun stew, a heaping pile of Nova Scotia mussels, and a handful of silver-dollar-sized scallops straight from the wharf, but the showstopper was the Lunenburger, a beef patty piled with smoked mozzarella, bacon, lobster knuckle and claw meat, plus garlic aioli and tarragon-butter sauce, set on a smattering of baby spinach and crowned with a bacon-wrapped scallop. A jaw-dropping creation. After a feast like that, a nip of brandy was in order, so we popped over a few blocks to Ironworks Distillery (ironworksdistillery.com). A micro-distillery housed in an 1893 blacksmith’s shop, Ironworks leans on the Maritime Provinces’ rum-loving heritage (the Rum Boat Rum is a standout, aged in bourbon barrels on the property and on the floating barge anchored a stone’s throw from the shop’s side door), but the line also encompasses gin, vodka, and fruit-based brandies and liqueurs. The apple brandy hit the post-prandial spot, and the raspberry liqueur tasted like it got up and walked straight off the pages of Anne of Green Gables. (Remember when Anne and Diana nicked that bottle of raspberry cordial and got scandalously drunk?) Next stop, the evening's accommodations: Quarterdeck Beachside Villas and Grill (quarterdeck.ca), a collection of condo-style rooms with contemporary beach decor (think: IKEA meets shabby chic) and, overlooking the ocean, private decks complete with Adirondack chairs, as well as a stand-alone restaurant cranking out great seafood. Before dinner, as a preview of a similar event slated for the Lobster Crawl’s closing weekend, we took a painting class led by celebrated local artist Andre Haines. Over glasses of sparkling Nova Scotian wine, the multi-talented theater alum introduced us to traditional provincial tunes and painterly techniques alike—a thoroughly enjoyable experience, though, suffice it to say, I will not be giving up my day job for an artist's studio anytime soon. Day 2: Cape Sable Island, Clark's Harbour, and Barrington Passage America has Punxsutawney Phil, Nova Scotia has Lucy the Lobster. We were up before dawn on Groundhog Day, bound for Barrington’s Cape Sable Island Causeway to see if the tough-shelled celebrity would amble out of her cage and see her shadow, or if spring was on its way. Lucy was feeling a bit drowsy, but her handlers gleefully pronounced that she’d caught a glimpse of her reflection, meaning six more weeks of lobster season was sure to follow. We cruised by Clark’s Harbour, a working wharf, and Cape Sable, Atlantic Canada’s most southerly point of land, before our visit to Fisher Direct (fisherdirect.ca), a family-owned and operated facility that delivers live lobsters to vendors all over the world, particularly China. With tanks and spray systems that can hold upwards of 400,000 pounds of live lobster at a time, the plant processes 10 million pounds annually—a mind-boggling number, though owner Tyler Nickerson is quick to point out it isn’t really that much, especially compared to his big-box competitors. A classic lobster dinner, courtesy of Capt. Kat's Lobster Shack. (Maya Stanton) Given the copious local bounty, it's no surprise that area restaurants take full advantage. In Barrington, the self-proclaimed lobster capital of Canada, Capt. Kat’s Lobster Shack (captkatslobstershack.weebly.com) knows its way around a crustacean, with a menu boasting lobster fondue, lobster poutine, lobster-topped fish cakes, and 2018's champion lobster roll. But creamed lobster is a South Shore specialty, and the interpretation here is the next best thing to home-cooking—or so I’ve been told. With chunks of fresh meat sautéed in copious amounts of butter, finished off with heavy cream, and served atop a thick slab of toast, it’s not exactly a light starter, but you can’t leave the province without giving it a taste. That, along with an impeccably steamed whole lobster, might’ve been the best meal I had all week. The lodge at White Point Beach Resort. (Maya Stanton) White Point Beach Resort (whitepoint.com) was my next port of call, and its airy, light-filled lodge offered a warm welcome, with windows facing the Atlantic, a towering stone fireplace, and cozy armchairs and leather sofas practically begging guests to sink right in and stay while. (As an added bonus, its grounds are populated by bunnies that appear out of nowhere when you proffer treats, and who doesn't love bunnies?) Lobster-themed s’mores—chocolate-dipped, lobster-shaped sugar cookies in lieu of graham crackers, and marshmallows roasted on a roaring fire—capped off the night. Day 3: West Berlin and White Point It was lobster-boat day, and my alarm went off just as the sun was cresting over the horizon. Those fishermen who'd already been out for hours in the dark, cold morning deserve every penny they're earning—a feeling that only got stronger the more time we spent onboard, especially when my digits felt like they might be in danger. But Captain Brad Crouse was a gracious host, with an easy smile and a steady hand on the wheel, and his operation a well-oiled machine. The tiny crew worked quickly and efficiently to pull the traps and measure their catch, tossing back the too-small specimens and banding the larger ones’ claws, re-baiting the traps, and pushing them off the stern and back into the sea. A crew member shows off a keeper onboard Captain Crouse's lobster boat. (Maya Stanton) On the roster of festival activities this chilly Sunday was a Lobster 101 seminar with Atlantic Canada's tartan-clad culinary ambassador, Alain Bossé. A high-profile cookbook author, consultant, and educator known as the Kilted Chef, Alain took the small crowd through the ins and outs of lobster biology—unsettling mating habits and all—before detailing how best to store and prepare your catch for prime consumption. And then, finally, we were on to the main event: the lobster-roll contest. The winning lobster roll, from 27 South in Bridgewater. (Maya Stanton) Lobster rolls are one of my favorite things to eat, so I was beyond excited to sit on the panel of judges for this year's contest. The variety on display was remarkable: There were rolls with finely chopped meat and rolls with huge chunks of tail and claw, rolls with arugula and with plain old lettuce, rolls with too much celery and with just enough chives. There was one with an Asian-inspired slaw, and one dotted with mixed herbs. Ultimately, and in a surprise upset, our favorite (above) came from 27 South (facebook.com/twentysevensouth) at the Bridgewater Best Western. The chef claimed his secret was the lobster-infused mayo, but whatever it was, I wanted seconds. Sunset over the Atlantic. (Maya Stanton) In a fitting bookend to the day, the winner was announced and the contest wrapped up just as the sun was setting—I’d watched it come up, after all, and it’s not often I’m awake that early. I stepped out onto the property’s elevated deck to take in the show. Day 4: Port Medway and Mahone Bay On our final morning on the South Shore, we drove northeast, bound for The Port Grocer (theportgrocer.ca), a quaint, all-purpose café, market, post office, and gift shop in Port Medway. After coffee, salads, and seafood chowder, we got to the reason for our visit: a garlicky, cheesy, tender crust topped with chunks of lobster and sprinkled with finely chopped parsley. Most seafood pizzas overpromise and underdeliver, but this one holds up to the hype—and it’s developed such a loyal following that the proprietors can’t keep them in stock. The Port Grocer's lobster pizza, worth every bite. (Maya Stanton) We took the scenic route back to Halifax, checking out Port Medway’s circa-1899 lighthouse (a Registered Heritage Property), Mahone Bay’s colorful waterfront, known for its Three Churches, and Chester, an upscale community with breathtaking homes. It was a relaxing end to a jam-packed, lobster-filled trip, and I’m plotting a return for the seafood alone—but next time, I’ll bring the right boots. Nova Scotia's 2019 South Shore Lobster Crawl runs February 1-19; for more information, visit lobstercrawl.ca. The lobster-boat excursion is part of the Great Canadian Lobster Fishing Feast offered by White Point Beach Resort; packages start from around $525 (USD) per person for two nights and include a half-day fishing trip, a lobster lunch cooked over a bonfire, and oceanfront accommodations.

    Inspiration

    6 Great Destinations That Survived Sandy

    It's almost impossible to shake the dramatic images of waves crashing over Casino Pier's iconic roller coaster after it was pushed into the Atlantic during Hurricane Sandy. Our hearts broke with the news of entire communities throughout the east coast being ravaged by ferocious floods and in the unfortunate case of Breezy Point, NY, unstoppable fires. Despite such suffering and turmoil, people came together to help each other, communities worked together, and one year later, things are looking a whole lot better. While so much work still needs to be done in many of New York and New Jersey's residential areas, several popular destinations have bounced back. From the Hamptons to the Jersey Shore, here are six popular places that survived the storm and why you should pay them a visit. CONEY ISLAND Despite the storm, Coney Island's signature amusement park, Luna Park, was able to open its summer 2013 season right on schedule, thanks in part to hundreds of volunteers from all five boroughs who came together to help rebuild the area's playgrounds, streets, churches, and iconic boardwalk. Luna Park recently unveiled Water Mania, a new ride similar to Disney's Tea Cup attraction that lets visitors spray water cannons at other riders as they spin around. Luna Park will open two new rides this summer, and plans to bring back the Thunderbolt, a 125-foot tall, 2,000-foot long roller coaster that will reach speeds of up to 65 miles per hour, in 2014. Pay a visit to Coney Island's timeless attractions, brave the almighty Cyclone, and take a ride on the historic B&B Carousel in the newly christened Steeplechase Plaza. If all else fails, you can always stop for a bite at Nathan's Famous, home of the original Coney Island Hot Dog. ATLANTIC CITY Contrary to popular belief, Atlantic City was not hit hard by Hurricane Sandy last fall and was actually back on its feet within a week of the storm-in fact the area still continues to bounce back post-Sandy with new openings and events along its iconic stretch of New Jersey coastline. The Tropicana Casino and Resort opened six new restaurants and AC's iconic Steel Pier debuted eight new rides this summer. Ultra-chic hotel Revel also opened its new HQ Beach Club over Memorial Day weekend, a nightclub modeled after the posh décor of Mykonos that features pools, bungalows, bars, DJs, and a new dance floor. For free family-friendly entertainment, don't miss AC Dreamin', a new 3-D light show featuring catchy music and creative, thought-provoking images against the façade of Boardwalk Hall every half hour between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m nightly. LOWER MANHATTAN While images of the New York City subway system overflowing with floodwaters might still come to mind, it's important to remember that things are for the most part back to normal in Lower Manhattan. Shop for farm fresh produce at one of the Greenmarkets Downtown-try the Bowling Green Greenmarket at Broadway and Battery Place every Tuesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. thru Dec. 26th, or the Staten Island Ferry Terminal Greenmarket, every Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. thru Dec. 31st. Treat the family to a picnic in Battery Park with views of the Statue of Liberty or take advantage of the City's new Citi Bike Stations and take a bike tour Lower Manhattan at your own pace. MONTAUK AND THE HAMPTONS While Long Island didn't receive as much television coverage during Sandy compared to other places, Montauk, the Hamptons, and most of Long Island's beaches endured large amounts of flooding and beach erosion as a result of the storm. Trees fell, water rose, and power outages were rampant. Luckily, one year later, the beaches are in much better shape. According to an article byCurbed Hamptons, $700 million was recently approved by Congress to go towards rebuilding Long Island's South Shore, namely Montauk, Hampton Bays, East Quogue, and West Hampton Dunes Village-East Hampton Town is bringing in roughly 10,000 yards of sand to support Ditch Plains since the project reportedly won't begin until late next year. THE JERSEY SHORE If New Jersey's Stronger than the Storm campaign is any indication, the Jersey Shore has bounced back from the effects of Hurricane Sandy with courage, style, and grace. This summer, the beaches were open from Long Beach Island all the way down to Cape May and area hotels, B&Bs, restaurants, and shops are eagerly awaiting your visit. Check out the Stronger Than The Storm Fall Guide for a list of haunted houses, hayrides, corn mazes, pick-your-own pumpkin and apple farms, and the best places to see fall colors. 26 B&Bs and Inns along the Jersey Shore are also participating in Back Inn Business, a campaign offering 10 percent off rates for Sunday-Thursday stays this October in honor of the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. STATEN ISLAND Here's a novel idea: take a free ride on the Staten Island Ferry from Manhattan and actually stick around to explore the fifth borough before heading back to the City. There's a lot going on in Staten Island. History buffs shouldn't miss the chance to explore Fort Wadsworth, one of the oldest military sites in the country, Historic Richmond Town, an 11-acre living history museum on New York City's oldest farm, and Sandy Ground, a community settled in the 1800s by freed slaves from New York, Delaware, and Maryland that later became an important stop on the Underground Railroad. Visit the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art, the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum, and the Snug Harbor Cultural Center for a taste of culture on one of New York City's most culturally diverse boroughs.

    Inspiration

    11 Spectacular Labor Day Getaways

    Labor Day weekend may be just around the corner, but it's not too late to plan the perfect three-day getaway. From coast to coast and around the world, there are plenty of free and budget-friendly activities to choose from. Whether you're in the mood for a Jazz Festival in Chicago, a quirky traditional event held every year in Park City, or an American music extravaganza in Virginia Beach, we've rounded up 11 exciting events and festivals around the country you won't want to miss. SEE THE DESTINATIONS! Daytona Beach: For family-friendly fun on a famous Florida beach While the words Daytona Beach may conjure up scenes from MTV's Spring Break, the area has come a long way since then, and is now much more of a family destination offering a wide variety of kid-friendly events, festivals, and beachfront entertainment fit for all ages. This Labor Day Weekend, catch a free concert at the Daytona Beach Bandshell on Saturday night starting at 7:15 p.m. featuring a performance by Rocket Man, an Elton John tribute band—stick around for a fireworks show starting at 9:45 p.m. Baseball lovers can watch the Daytona Tortugas play ball on Sept. 4th, 5th, and 6th at the Jackie Robinson Ballpark, where dogs are welcome and the kids will have a chance to run the bases—don't miss their fireworks show Saturday night. Also while you're in town, stop by the Daytona International Speedway for a behind-the-scenes look at all things NASCAR. Hotels in this part of Florida are super affordable over Labor Day Weekend, too, with rates at the Courtyard Daytona Beach Speedway/Airport starting at $109 a night and rates at the Residence Inn Daytona Beach Speedway/Airport starting at $159 a night. Lake Tahoe: For carnivals, boat races, and great discounts on ski gear On Saturday, Sept. 5th, you'll have the opportunity to board one of South Shore's two Mississippi paddlewheeler boats, California's Tahoe Queen or Nevada's M.S. Dixie II, for the 23rd annual Great Lake Tahoe Sternwheeler Race, a unique only-in-Tahoe experience that can be yours for from $25 per adult ($10 per child) including brunch and drink specials. If you'd rather be a spectator, cheer runners on from the sidelines as they compete in the fourth annual Heavenly Mountain Run, racing from the California Base Lodge at 6,565-feet all the way up to the Tamarack Lodge at 9,150-feet. You can also enjoy live music with an impressive fireworks display over the lake Sunday night starting at 8:30 p.m. Another notable weekend event is the 6th annual Sample the Sierra Festival on Sept. 6th from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Bijou Community Park, where you can sample fresh farm-to-table food and wine creations by local chefs and farmers. Don't miss the chance to stock up on ski gear for next season at the annual Heavenly Sports Labor Day Tent Sale, where you can save up to 70 percent on ski and snowboard equipment at Heavenly's California Main Lodge on Sept. 5th from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sept. 6th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sept 7th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Puerto Rico: For a no-passport-required Caribbean beach break Airfares to this sizzling U.S. island (no passport required!) are around $445 for Labor Day travel. Sound good? Picture yourself lounging on the beach listening to the waves crash in the distance, fruity drink in hand. Spend some time exploring Puerto Rico at your own pace with this travel package to San Juan that includes ocean view accommodations at La Concha Resort, a Renaissance Resort located in San Juan's trendy Condado neighborhood. You'll also get daily breakfast for two at the resort's Ocean Café Restaurant among other perks, from $186 a night. (Note: While Labor Day falls during the Atlantic/Caribbean hurricane season, the NOAA has predicted a quieter season than average for 2015, with only 1 to 4 hurricanes, and possibly only 1 ranked as a Category 3, serious, hurricane.) RELATED: 25 Incredible Road Trips BT Readers Love The Jersey Shore: For beachside water parks on the pier The beaches along the Jersey Shore have definitely bounced back from last year's storm damage with style—some of them even made our list of America's Most Awesome Boardwalks, and Ocean City, N.J. was featured as one of BT's favorite beach towns. This Labor Day weekend, pay a visit to one of New Jersey's many beachside waterparks, like Raging Waters and the Ocean Oasis Waterpark & Beach Club at Morey's Piers in Wildwood, now celebrating its 46th season, for a fun way to cool off in the hot summer sun, whether you prefer to relax in the lazy river or take on adrenaline-pumping attractions like the Cliff Dive slide and WipeOut. Waterpark passes start at $44 for adults and $36 for children under 48". Seniors over age 65 get in for $20 with a valid photo ID. Paris: The perfect place for a romantic three-day weekend getaway A three-day weekend in Paris? Yes, you can! In fact, Budget Travel Senior Editor Jamie Beckman just did it. Find a neighborhood that you like, book a comfortable hotel, and relax—don’t overschedule and you’ll enjoy exploring on foot, visiting green spaces, and soaking up the romance. Hotel 29 Lepic’s stellar location, near the Sacré-Coeur basilica and Moulin Rouge in Montmartre, is tough to beat for the price (from about $70 per night, 29lepic.fr). And though average airfares from the U.S. to Paris are around $1,063 right now, WOW airlines has round-trip flights to Paris out of Boston and Washington, D.C., starting at about $384 after taxes. Washington D.C.: For free concerts and kayaking on the Potomac Each year on the Sunday of Labor Day weekend, the National Symphony Orchestra performs a free concert for the public on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol at 8 p.m. While no tickets are required, it is recommended that you get there early to get a good spot—gates open as early as 3 p.m. and you can watch them rehearse at 3:30 p.m. The 27th annual DC Blues Festival is slated for Saturday, Sept. 5th at the Carter Barron Amphitheater from noon to 7:30 p.m., with performances by Sharrie Williams, James Armstrong, and The Mojo Priests among others. You'll also have the opportunity to attend vocal, guitar, and harmonica workshops led by talented Blues artists at the John Cephas Workshop Stage. The DC Blues Festival is free and open to the public. Want to enjoy the great outdoors during your long weekend? Consider renting a kayak or canoe from the Thompson Boat Center for a totally different view of the city from the Potomac. Canoe rentals cost $16.50 per hour or $33 for the day and can hold up to three adults or two adults and two small children. Rent a single kayak for $16.50 per hour or $44 per day, or a double kayak for $22 an hour or $55 per day. RELATED: 20 Best-Kept Secrets of Washington D.C. Chicago: For free art fairs and a jazz festival The 37th annual Chicago Jazz Festival takes place this year from Sept. 3rd to Sept. 6th at the Chicago Cultural Center in Millennium Park. Admission is free and you'll have the chance to view performances by Muhal Richard Abrams, Jose James, and Dee Dee Bridgewater among others. From Friday to Monday, Washington Park is home to the 26th Annual African Festival of the Arts, an event featuring exhibitions by Chicago's best artists. General admission tickets cost $20 for adults at the gate, $15 in advance; family and weekend passes are available for $40. Click here for more fun things to do in Chicago year-round. Virginia Beach: For three days of bands on the beach—and a half-marathon Music lovers, rejoice! For three days over Labor Day weekend (Fri-Sun), more than 20 bands will take the stage for the 32nd annual American Music Festival playing all kinds of music—rock and roll, jazz, blues, country, and R&B—by local, regional, and national bands on a giant beachfront stage on 5th Street as well as several outdoor stages at the 17th Street Park, the 24th Street Park, and the 31st Street Park. Highlights include big-name artists like the Steve Miller Band on Friday night, Rebelution, The Wailers, and G. Love & Special Sauce on Saturday night, and a performance by Sheryl Crow on Sunday night. Tickets cost $20 in advance and $25 the day of the show. This year, you can purchase a Passport Pin for access to all three shows, from $40 when purchased in advance. Those seeking a more active vacation can sign up for the Rock 'n' Roll Virginia Beach Half-Marathon, a race through the streets of the city on Sunday, Sept. 6th, that raises money for St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital. Registration prices may vary; check the website for more details. Miami: For parties, brunches, and bike rides on the beach Party people won't want to miss Reload, a pool party event from noon to 8 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 6th, at the Shore Club featuring international DJs and the best house music in South Beach. Refuel at the Shore Club's Sunday brunch, where ladies pay $44 per person including unlimited mimosas and bellinis (men must pay $44 for the brunch plus an additional $20 for unlimited drinks)—access to the Bloody Mary bar is an extra $20. Tickets to the Reload pool party start at $40 per person for all day access or from $30 per person for pool party access between noon and 3 p.m. Early bird tickets start at $10 per person when ordered ahead of time online. Take a spin on Miami's public bike sharing program,Citi Bike Miami (operated by Deco Bike Miami), for a spin, and rent a bike anywhere from 30-minutes to a full day. 30-minute passes are available for $4; one-hour passes for $6; two-hour passes for $10, four-hour passes for $18; and one-day passes are available for $24. Looking for a calmer beach experience? Stake out the perfect spot on any of Miami Beach's seven miles of sand. The best part: it's free. DON'T MISS: 20 Most Awesome Boardwalks in America Park City: For historic parades and the Running of the Balls Labor Day is more commonly referred to as Park City Miner's Day in this part of Utah—a tradition dating all the way back to 1898. Each year there's a celebration in honor of the area's rich mining heritage, complete with a community pancake breakfast, live music, races and games for the kids, the Funky 5K Fun Run, and the annual Miner's Day Parade down Historic Main Street. Perhaps the most intriguing part of the celebration is the annual Running of the Balls, a charity fundraising event held on Monday at 10:45 a.m. where participants "adopt" a ball for $5 (or 5 balls for $20), and watch in awe as thousands of them are released down Main Street, racing to the bottom of the hill. The first ten to reach the bottom of the street are tracked, earning their owners a grand prize of airline tickets, season ski passes, or any number of other donated surprises. LEGOLAND: Kiddie paradise in Florida & Southern California If you’ve got little ones, LEGOLAND is like Paris for kids—always a good idea. With fun rides, hands-on activities, and a hotel that feels like it’s built out of those iconic colorful blocks, the theme park’s So. Cal and Florida locations are a fun way to say bye-bye to summer. Even better, if you purchase LEGOLAND dollars (now available on the TravelEx currency exchange) through Labor Day you’ll get free parking, free admission to the park’s water park, and a free order of the theme park’s famous Granny’s Apple Fries.

    Travel Tips

    Hawaii: Answers to 5 common travel questions

    Here's an interview with Rachel Klein, editor of Fodor's Hawaii 2010. Klein is also the Hawaii expert for Fodor's 80 degrees, a Web tool that lets you find a warm-weather escape best suited for your personality based on 20 criteria. 1. Which island should I go to? Oahu is sometimes referred to as "one stop Hawaii" because it offers visitors a sampling of experiences and activities that can be found on all the other islands. Those interested in history won't want to miss Pearl Harbor and the Bishop Museum. Maui is a popular pick for honeymooners, as its beaches are considered some of Hawaii's most beautiful and the resorts of West and South Maui are spectacular. The breathtaking views on Maui's Road to Hana are sure to inspire romance. Kauai offers a more secluded, slower-paced island vacation on its splendid, lush Napali Coast, sunny South Shore beaches, and the sleepy quaint town of Hanalei. The Big Island is a good choice for families, as there are tons of active adventures with a scientific spin, including visiting Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and taking a trip to the top of Mauna Kea to see some of the world's largest telescopes at the Keck Observatory. Molokai and Lanai are your best bets are for those truly looking to get away from it all. 2. What's the weather like? There isn't a bad time to visit Hawaii when it comes to warm weather, as temperatures hover around 80 degrees Fahrenheit year-round on all the islands. However, the change in seasons can bring more or less rain; in winter, some beaches become unsafe for swimming due to currents and tides, and hiking trails tend to become flooded. Also, each island has its own unique weather patterns based on elevation and other factors, meaning that you may find rain in one spot and brilliant sunshine just a short distance away—something to consider if you plan to rent a convertible. 3. What are some special Hawaiian activities for kids? Aside from water activities—snorkeling and body-boarding being two popular choices—and outdoor adventures such as zip-lining and mountain tubing that are available around the islands, most of the larger Hawaiian resorts have cultural programs for kids. Everything from storytelling about Hawaiian mythology to native craft-making is often part of the experience. There are also luaus to attend on every island, some more authentic and others more of a show, but most are very kid-friendly. 4. What are some of the best one-day itineraries I can take on each island? On Oahu: You'll be up at dawn due to the time change and dead on your feet by afternoon due to jet lag. Have a sunrise swim, change into walking gear, and head to Diamond Head for a hike. The climb is fairly strenuous—think lots of stairs—but it affords spectacular views of Honolulu, Waikiki, and the ocean. After lunch, nap in the shade, do some shopping, or visit the nearby East Honolulu neighborhoods of Mo'ili'ili and Kaimuki, rife with small shops and good, little restaurants. End the day with an early, interesting, and inexpensive dinner at one of these neighborhood spots. On Maui: If you don't plan to spend an entire day hiking in the volcanic crater at Haleakala National Park, this itinerary will at least allow you to take a peek at it. Get up early and head straight for the summit of Haleakala (if you're jet-lagged and waking up in the middle of the night, you may want to get there in time for sunrise). Bring water, sunscreen, and warm clothing; it's freezing at sunrise. Plan to spend a couple of hours exploring the various lookout points in the park. On your way down the mountain, turn right on Makawao Avenue, and head into the little town of Makawao. You can have lunch here, or make a left on Baldwin Avenue and head downhill to the North Shore town of Paia, which has a number of great lunch spots and shops to explore. Spend the rest of your afternoon at Pa'ia's main strip of sand, Ho'okipa Beach. On the Big Island: Take a day to enjoy the splendors of the Hamakua Coast, or any gorge you see on the road is an indication of a waterfall waiting to be explored. For a sure bet, head to beautiful Waipi'o Valley. Book a horseback, hiking, or 4WD tour or walk on in by yourself (just keep in mind that it's an arduous hike back up, with a 25 percent grade for a little over a mile). Once in the valley, take your first right to get to the black-sand beach. Take a moment to sit here: The ancient Hawaiians believed this was where souls crossed over to the afterlife. Whether you believe that or not, there's something unmistakably special about this place. Waterfalls abound in the valley, depending on the amount of recent rainfall. Your best bet is to follow the river from the beach to the back of the valley, where a waterfall and its lovely pool await. On Kauai: Start your day before sunrise and head west to Port Allen Marina. Check in with one of the tour-boat operators—who will provide you with plenty of coffee to jump-start your day—and cruise the iconic Napali Coast. Slather up with sunscreen and be prepared for a long—and sometimes big—day on the water; you can enjoy a couple of mai tais on the return trip. Something about the sun and the salt air conspires to induce a powerful sense of fatigue—so don't plan anything in the evening. The trip also helps build a huge appetite, so stop at Grinds in Hanapepe on the way home. 5. What are some Hawaiian "street foods" I must try? For something easy, inexpensive, and very local, try a "plate lunch," which usually consists of a main entrée (often meat-based), a scoop of macaroni salad, and two scoops of rice. Also cheap and filling is Spam musubi, a Hawaii-only version with the canned ham topping the traditional Japanese rectangular seaweed-wrapped rice snack. Everyone will love "shave ice" (note: not "shaved ice," which if uttered will immediately let people know you're a tourist), a plastic cone filled with extremely finely-shaven ice, sweetened with food coloring and often topped with a scoop of ice cream plus a dusting of tart li hing power, made from dried plum. Also don't miss the great fresh fruits, baked goods, at roadside stands and weekly farmers markets. REAL DEALS! See Budget Travel's hand-picked vacation package deals for Hawaii Earlier: Reader tips on where to eat and sleep in Hawaii

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    DESTINATION IN Illinois

    Illinois South

    Illinois ( (listen) IL-ə-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It has the fifth largest gross domestic product (GDP), the sixth largest population, and the 25th largest land area of all U.S. states. Illinois has been noted as a microcosm of the entire United States. With Chicago in northeastern Illinois, small industrial cities and immense agricultural productivity in the north and center of the state, and natural resources such as coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base, and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to international ports via two main routes: from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River, via the Illinois River, through the Illinois Waterway. The Mississippi River, the Ohio River, and the Wabash River form parts of the boundaries of Illinois. For decades, Chicago's O'Hare International Airport has been ranked as one of the world's busiest airports. Illinois has long had a reputation as a bellwether both in social and cultural terms and, through the 1980s, in politics. The capital of Illinois is Springfield, which is located in the central part of the state. Although today Illinois's largest population center is in its northeast, the state's European population grew first in the west as the French settled lands near the Mississippi River, when the region was known as Illinois Country and was part of New France. Following the American Revolutionary War, American settlers began arriving from Kentucky in the 1780s via the Ohio River, and the population grew from south to north. In 1818, Illinois achieved statehood. Following increased commercial activity in the Great Lakes after the construction of the Erie Canal, Chicago was incorporated in the 1830s on the banks of the Chicago River at one of the few natural harbors on the southern section of Lake Michigan. John Deere's invention of the self-scouring steel plow turned Illinois's rich prairie into some of the world's most productive and valuable farmland, attracting immigrant farmers from Germany and Sweden. The Illinois and Michigan Canal (1848) made transportation between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River valley faster and cheaper, and new railroads carried immigrants to new homes in the country's west and shipped commodity crops to the nation's east. The state became a transportation hub for the nation.By 1900, the growth of industrial jobs in the northern cities and coal mining in the central and southern areas attracted immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. Illinois was an important manufacturing center during both world wars. The Great Migration from the South established a large community of African Americans in the state, including Chicago, who founded the city's famous jazz and blues cultures. Chicago, the center of the Chicago Metropolitan Area, is now recognized as a global city. Chicagoland, Chicago's metropolitan area, encompasses about 65% of the state's population. The most populous metropolitan areas outside the Chicago area include, Metro East (of Greater St. Louis), Peoria and Rockford. Three U.S. presidents have been elected while living in Illinois: Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and Barack Obama. Additionally, Ronald Reagan, whose political career was based in California, was born and raised in the state. Today, Illinois honors Lincoln with its official state slogan Land of Lincoln, which has been displayed on its license plates since 1954. The state is the site of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield and the future home of the Barack Obama Presidential Center in Chicago.