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    Independence,

    Missouri

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    Independence is the fifth-largest city in Missouri. It lies within Jackson County, of which it is the county seat. Independence is a satellite city of Kansas City, Missouri, and is the largest suburb on the Missouri side of the Kansas City metropolitan area. In 2010, it had a total population of 116,830.Independence is known as the "Queen City of the Trails" because it was a point of departure for the California, Oregon, and Santa Fe Trails. It is the hometown of U.S. President Harry S. Truman, with the Truman Presidential Library and Museum, and the gravesites of Truman and First Lady Bess Truman. The city is sacred to the Latter Day Saint movement, as the home of Joseph Smith's 1831 Temple Lot, and the headquarters of several Mormon factions.
    Find more things to do, itinerary ideas, updated news and events, and plan your perfect trip to Independence
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    Inspiration

    Get your history fix in Philadelphia

    There is plenty to splurge on in Philadelphia, from rooftop cocktails at the Hotel Monaco to High Tea at the Rittenhouse Hotel. And while hitting up a pricey art museum and then indulging in Vetri Cucina's quattro piatti for dinner is a good time, Philly doesn't have to be expensive - especially if you're a history buff. Luckily, most of Philly's top attractions are easily accessible via public transportation, which is very affordable. One-way subway rides are just $2.50. For just $13, you can get a one-day SEPTA Independence Pass, which allows you to switch between modes of transportation. Then there's the tourist-friendly Philly PLASH bus which stops at the city's main tourist attractions for just $2 per ride or $5 for a day pass. Here is our guide to taking in Philadelphia's history and culture without breaking the bank. Philly's top historical sites Entrance to the Liberty Bell Center is free, and it's open on a first-come, first-serve basis with capacity restrictions in place. While the bell is visible from outside the center, there are benefits to waiting in line to get inside. One side of the hallway is lined with exhibits, and there's also a space for rotating temporary exhibitions. And once inside, you get an unobstructed photo op of this American icon. Independence Hall tickets must be reserved online in advance. They carry a $1 reservation fee, which is less than the cost of a small "wooder" ice anywhere in Philly. Guided tours last 30 minutes and run every 15 minutes, with the last one each day starting at 4:45 PM. Between the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall sits the President's House, an outdoor exhibit that explores the contradiction of freedom and slavery during the founding of the United States. The 24-hour open-air display sits on the former grounds of America's first executive mansion. George Washington and John Adams lived here while James Hoban was constructing the first White House. Beneath the large glass vitrine at the south end of the exhibit, you can see the foundations of the predecessor to The White House. Philly's best history museums under $10 The Liberty Bell and Independence Hall get most of the much-deserved attention when it comes to historic sites in Philly. But both are surrounded by history museums that are affordable and family-friendly. Just a couple blocks east of the Independence Visitor Center, you can tour the Betsy Ross House with an audio guide for under $10. Each tour includes a Q & A with a Besty Ross reenactor dressed in period clothing. For no additional fee, you can find out why she kept the name "Ross" after remarrying twice and learn what George Washington was like to do business with. Before you reach the Betsy Ross House, you'll pass Benjamin Franklin's gravesite, which you can visit between noon and 4 Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is $5, but many choose to experience Ben's final resting place by throwing pennies onto his gravestone through the cemetery gates. You are better off saving your $5 and using it to enter the Benjamin Franklin Museum, located just one block south of his final resting place. You'll get much more for your money, including five rooms of exhibits, videos, touchscreen interactives, and hundreds of artifacts. Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Photo by Sean Pavone, iStock Explore America's oldest residential street A couple blocks east of the Betsy Ross house is Elfreth's Alley. This well-preserved, car-free cobblestone street is widely recognized as the oldest continuously inhabited street in the United States. There's a small museum halfway down this short, narrow alley, sandwiched between homes that date back to 1755. The museum is open from noon to 4 Friday through Sunday. Admission is just $3, with an optional audio guide for an additional $3. Even if you cannot stop by during their business hours, you can't leave the City of Brotherly Love without visiting Elfreth's Alley. The Fireman's Hall Museum is located one block north of Elfreth's Alley. This restored 1902 firehouse has various tools of the trade on display, some of which date back to the earliest days of the Philadelphia Fire Department. Reservations are free but must be made in advance, and donations to the fire department are appreciated. Live our your Rocky fantasy for less than the price of a movie ticket Regardless of the time of day or year, the Rocky Statue is a major attraction. You may have to wait in line to get your picture snapped with the world's most famous fictional sports hero, but it's an essential Philly experience! From there, you should climb the 72 steps to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Some run like young Rocky did, while the rest ascend at a more leisurely pace reminiscent of an aging Rocky in the first Creed movie. Once atop, you can take in the view of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Logan Square, and the Philly skyline. Get lost in a public market Reading Terminal Market dates back to 1893. Before Philly had the subway system that we know today, the Reading Railroad Company operated the city's main market. Back then, it had 250 specialty vendors and up to 100 farmers on any given day. Today, the National Historic Landmark market operates daily from 8 to 6 with more than 70 vendors. Inside, you'll see (and smell) Philly cheesesteaks, as well as a mix of fresh fish, meat, and cheese. You can also purchase treats sold by Amish vendors from nearby Lancaster County. If you're driving in and plan to explore the area for a couple of hours, it's worth making a $10 purchase at the market. That will get you two-hour validated $5 parking at two of the nearby garages. But it's even more affordable to take the SEPTA Regional Rail to Jefferson Station or the underground MFL to 11th Street ----- SPONSORED BY GEICO Carefully crafted collaboratively between GEICO, Budget Travel, and Lonely Planet. Both parties provided research and curated content to produce this story. We disclose when information isn’t ours.

    Travel Tips

    So, you’re thinking of living the RV life. Here’s what you need to know

    This content is sponsored by In the last few years, RV sales have skyrocketed as more and more Americans decide to live nomadically while traveling the country. We decided to dig into the lifestyle by interviewing six individuals or couples experiencing it themselves. Here’s what you need to know. Why do people typically choose an RV over other methods of long-term travel? There are many ways to experience long-term travel in the US. People have lived in their cars, gotten into #vanlife, or have even survived by moving from vacation rental to vacation rental. Why did those we interview decide to go with RV life? In a nutshell, the answer was space. Partners need room to do their own things: Whether it’s space to work creatively or to have simultaneous work meetings, having just one room doesn’t work for many couples. Friends and family can visit: Many RVers went into the lifestyle thinking they wanted family and friends to be able to visit and travel with them. Having a bigger space like an RV meant they could convince more to do so. Keep all your traditional conveniences: Those we interviewed wanted to travel more but didn’t want to give up the convenience of spaces such as a kitchen, living room, and bathroom. For some, switching to something smaller than an RV, like a van, would have been too much of a leap. For the amount of time they anticipated traveling, it made sense to get a bigger space they would be comfortable in. A place to call home (that actually feels like a home): One of the biggest reasons for RV life is for something to come back to at the end of the day that felt like a home, rather than just a suitcase or a small vehicle. The @wherewildonesroam family bought their first RV in 2017 and started off as part-time RVers who traveled on weekends. They moved into their rig full-time in 2018 and never looked back. They have no plans to stop the nomadic lifestyle any time soon. Photo courtesy of @wherewildonesroam, via Instagram Where do you sleep? There are quite a few places you can park your RV at night. These are the most common. Campgrounds: Using campgrounds that provide hookups is the classic RV parking method. Boondocking: Boondocking refers to finding a piece of land to camp on where you’re not hooked up to anything. It’s much more affordable than staying at a campground but does require some investment up front. Being self-sufficient in an RV is often synonymous with things like solar panels, extra batteries, extra water tanks, and extra fuel tanks. Boondocking is infinitely easier to do out West. Moochdocking: Moochdocking is where you set up camp on a friend or family member’s driveway. What type of RV should you get? While selecting your RV is a very personal choice, there are a few things everyone should consider. Power to get over mountain passes: One of the couples we interviewed used to have a class-C RV that had trouble with this task. They began to feel limited on where they could travel – the exact opposite of their intention in buying an RV. Personal safety considerations: One RVer who used to travel solo said she loved having a drivable RV for the safety aspect. When she parked somewhere for the night, she had the ability to simply move into the back to go to sleep. She didn’t need to walk around outside in order to access her bedroom. Ease of use while driving: Fifth wheels are going to be easier to tow than travel trailers as they are less tricky to back up and generally shift less in the wind. Keep in mind length corresponds with difficulty of driving. Age of the RV: A newer vehicle will likely need less renovations within. However, older RV electronics can be easier to maintain for those without a lot of RV knowledge. Newer rigs are generally more complicated, often requiring you to go to the dealership when something breaks. How do you finance your RV? For the most part, there are two options for buying your rig: Purchase it outright Finance It’s very similar to a car purchase, and financing makes breaking into the lifestyle a realistic achievement for those without too much in savings. Jim and Jessy are two musicians who live full time in their fifth wheel. They are self-proclaimed newbies who moved into their RV towards the end of 2020. You can follow their travels at @makingmcfarlin. Photo courtesy of @makingmcfarlin, via Instagram How much does RV life cost? The cost of RV life will depend heavily on how, where, and when you prefer to travel. Daily cost: Daily cost of living for items like food, campsites, and gas will vary wildly depending on the area you’re in. If you’re seeking out big destination areas (as many travelers like to do), you’ll be spending more money than elsewhere. Speed of travel: No matter where you park your rig, slowing down can help you save money. Oftentimes, campgrounds will give discounts for weekly or monthly stays, compared to nightly rates. You’ll also spend less on gas by traveling more slowly. RV life can work for every budget: In general, however, you can spend as much or as little as you want. Some get into RV life to save money. Others find themselves breaking even when compared to their previous life. Others find themselves spending more. You can make RV life work for whatever kind of budget you’re comfortable with. What do RVers do for income? The answer is a wide variety of things. Some have their own businesses that allow them to set their own hours. Some make money from YouTube, Instagram, and their blog. Many work regular full-time corporate jobs that are remote. Some work just part time to cover daily expenses. Some work seasonal jobs and travel the rest of the year. Others live off savings for a while. People make their transition all different ways. You have to figure out for yourself what will give you the independence to live in your RV while still making enough money to meet your financial goals. What safety essentials should you consider? Everyone has different levels at which they feel comfortable, so not all of these items will seem essential to every reader. But these are all safety measures taken by at least one of our RVers. Take a look and see what speaks to you. Wasp spray: Wasp spray can be used as a personal defense item. With a similar use case as pepper spray, this type of spray doesn’t dissipate into the air as easily. Firearm: A few of the RVers we spoke with are registered firearm carriers. Depending on the type of RV and the state you’re in, your home may be considered a domicile rather than a vehicle. This makes it simple to travel with a weapon of this sort across many state lines (but not all). First aid kit: Do your best to be prepared for small medical emergencies by purchasing the classic safety essential, a first aid kit. Home security camera: See who (or what) is outside your RV without needing to open the door. You can also use a security camera inside to keep an eye on your belongings or pets while you’re away. Motion sensing security lights: Just like many homes have, motion-sensing lights can be placed on the outside of your rig. Alarm system: You can have the same alarm systems installed for your RV as you would your stationary house. Get alerts to your phone if there’s suspicious activity. Built-in GPS for the internet: Having GPS connected to your internet allows you to see where your rig is as well as how fast it’s moving. This can be useful when you take it in for service. By utilizing this tool, some RVers have discovered that their mechanics have not treated their RVs properly. Bike lock: If you have a bike, be sure to get a good lock. Bike theft is one of the most frequent criminal acts RVers encounter. Fire extinguishers: Yes, fire extinguishers plural. Keep one in all areas in which your path to the exit could be blocked. Don’t forget to learn how to use one before you need it. Automatic fire suppression systems: There are now fire suppression systems that will automatically deploy. These can be installed in places such as your refrigerator or battery compartment. Kingpin: A kingpin is a locking mechanism that stops someone from simply coming over and taking your towable RV. Rachael from @rvadventuregal is a solo female RVer who began living in her fifth wheel about eight months ago. She’s passionate about showing other solo women that they have the ability to live this lifestyle if it’s something they want. Photo courtesy of @rvadventuregal, via Instagram What are automotive essentials associated with RV life? Many who enter RV life don’t know anything about RV or vehicle maintenance, and that’s ok. It’s important to know the basics, however, and have a general awareness of what’s going on. The most essential thing you can do is monitor your RV (and truck if you’re towing) so you can address a problem right away. One RVer equated RV maintenance to house maintenance. Just like you’re always fixing something for your stationary home, so too will you always be fixing something on your rig. Engage in preventative maintenance as much as is reasonable, have tools on hand in case of a tire emergency, and know you will likely end up becoming a little bit more handy once you’ve been in your RV for a while. What to monitor: Be sure to regularly monitor tire pressure, check fluids, inspect the seals on your windows, check your brake and turn signal lights, and keep an eye out for leaks or cracks that are forming. Stay proactive: Staying proactive on things like oil changes, power steering, and tire rotations will help you avoid problems in the future. Tools to keep on hand: You may want to consider keeping the following tools with you: a general tool kit, tire pressure gauge (perhaps even a remote tire pressure monitor), air compressor, and all tools necessary to change a tire. What are helpful resources for those either thinking about RV life or those in it already? YouTube: The number one answer: YouTube. With everything from maintenance how-tos to people speaking about their RV life experience, YouTube has got answers to practically all of your questions. Instagram: Instagram was used by those we interviewed for a wide variety of RV-related tasks, including finding a rig to buy. It can also be used for research. Learn tips and tricks by following accounts of those who live the lifestyle. People are happy to help you with questions if you message them! You can also reach out to fellow RVers on Instagram who are in your area in order to make friends in person. One of the individuals we interviewed has met over 100 people this way. Facebook: Facebook Marketplace is a useful tool for selling items before you move (or while on the road if you realize you brought way too much stuff). You can also find RVs for sale there. Facebook groups such as those surrounding RV life or working remotely can also be helpful! Craigslist: Craigslist is a great tool in finding RVs for sale. Campendium: Campendium is an app that helps travelers find places to camp in the US, Canada, and Mexico. It features user-generated reviews and cell service reports. We spoke with Cait from the dynamic duo of @rvwithrandc. When an opportunity for them to move abroad in 2018 fell through, they decided to explore some more of their own country. They now have a fifth wheel they live in full time as well as a truck camper Photo courtesy of @rvwithrandc, via Instagram What are the best parts of RV life? Seeing friends and family: Living in an RV makes it much easier to see friends and family. As one couple put it, they’re now able to visit with family they would normally only see at weddings and funerals. Spending more time in dream destinations: When you work a traditional 9-5 with limited PTO, your travels are also limited. Over the course of a year, you may go to a couple destinations for a week at a time. Because it’s a lifestyle rather than a vacation, living in an RV allows you to stay in these places for longer stretches. It also allows you to see so many more places than you can with just a few weeks off a year. What are some challenging aspects to living on the road? The first few months of transition during which you’re learning the basics can be difficult. Here are a few areas in which those we interviewed struggled. Small living area: There are many things you don’t think about when you imagine taking off in your rig down the road towards some of America’s most beautiful public lands. One of those things may be the fact that you’re going to be crammed into often less than 300 square feet. RVs are usually much larger than vans, but they’re still tiny in comparison to the stationary homes people leave behind. It takes some getting used to. Personal space and communication: Managing personal space can be a significant challenge. When you’re upset with someone, you can’t necessarily go to a separate room like you can in a regular house. Learning to honor and respect each other’s space is crucial. If you’re traveling with others, communication becomes essential. It’s easy to see this lifestyle leading to strained relationships if you don’t learn to be patient and communicate properly during frustrating situations – and you’ll have them, trust us. Weather and seasonal differences: Living on the road, you're at the mercy of the weather. Your life becomes much more connected to the elements. Becoming weather-aware is critical, especially because you likely won’t be used to a lot of the weather you encounter. Not every season of living in an RV is equal. Winter can be a difficult time to live in a small space. The days are shorter and the temperatures are colder, forcing you inside more frequently. Planning exhaustion: When you’re constantly traveling, that also means you’re constantly planning everything from where you’re going to sleep at night to what hikes you’ll doing that week. At the beginning, always thinking about logistics can be taxing. As you practice and figure out what tools you like, planning will become easier. Campground scarcity: Because the lifestyle has become so popular recently, some things have become more difficult. It can take time to get repairs and parts. Additionally, campsites are filled far ahead of time in some areas of the country. One couple we spoke with said they have sites booked out six months in advance because of how saturated the campgrounds on the East Coast are. Slight changes in daily chores: There are also much smaller daily challenges. One of these is laundry. It can be a hassle to spend a whole day washing your clothes at a laundromat when, before, you simply threw them in the machine at home. You also have to tweak your mindset when it comes to groceries. For many RVers, a full-size fridge is a luxury they don’t have. Additionally, while many grocery stores have similarities, there are also differences in layouts and brands across the country that can have you shopping for far longer than you intended to. Caroline and Aiden from @outrightravel are an RV life couple who travel in a drivable RV. Tethered by limited vacation time, they decided to create their own consulting businesses and move into their rig last year. By the time they finish the journey they Photo courtesy of @outrightravel, via Instagram What should you do before hitting the road? Financial planning: Make sure you’re entering this lifestyle responsibly. Ideally, you should begin with as little debt as possible. When you’re traveling the country, you don’t want to be stressing about credit card payments. It’ll only detract from the experience. Decide what to do with your home: If you own a home, decide whether you’re going to keep it or sell it. Many sell theirs, but it’s also possible to keep it and rent it out while you’re away Determine your residency: Many keep their current residency, some establish residency in a state in which they have close family, and some utilize residency programs for people who work remotely such as the one in South Dakota. Downsize: You will need so much less than you think you will. Downsize, downsize, downsize. It’ll save you weight, you won’t encounter nearly as many headaches when it comes to organization, and you’ll have more space. Anything you don’t bring with you can be easily purchased while on the road. Organize: When you have such a small space to work with, organization is key. If you do it right, you won’t feel like your space is small because you’ll be able to fit so much. Set yourself up for success right at the beginning by investing in storage solutions that not only allow you to fit everything you need, but also make those items easily accessible. Prepare to make mistakes: As with anything you try for the first time, there’s a learning curve during which mistakes will happen. Don’t beat yourself up about them or let the idea of them hold you back. Things will go wrong. Mentally prepare yourself for these and cut yourself some slack when they do inevitably happen. Dive in: The only way to learn everything you need to know about RV life is by jumping in. There’s only so much preparation you can do ahead of time. Do I have to get rid of every material thing I love? The easy answer to this question is no! Absolutely not, in fact. An RV really is like a mini house, so you’ll likely not give up too many items. Those we interviewed brought things like board games, books, blenders, office supplies, diffusers, espresso machines, and framed photographs. For sentimental or irreplaceable items, many RVers use storage, whether it be storage at their family members’ homes or in a storage unit. What should you do if you’re on the fence of joining RV life? Rent a rig: Before you head to a dealership (or Facebook Marketplace) to buy your home on wheels, consider renting an RV. This will give you a taste of the lifestyle before you dive in with a purchase. Live in the driveway: Whether or not you try living in an RV before purchasing one, take some time to test out your rig before you hit the road full time. First, live in your RV while it’s stationary. Get a feel for the space and learn what you do or don’t need in daily life. This step is especially important if you have pets. They need to get accustomed to the new space so they’re as comfortable as possible when it begins to move. Go on a test trip: Once you’ve gotten a little more comfortable, go on a month-long trip far from your home base. This allows you to get out of your comfort zone and get a taste for what full-time RV life is like while still allowing you the opportunity to fine-tune things before you head out permanently. After this point, you can bail if you decide RV life isn’t right for you. Commit to a time frame: If you’re still interested in the lifestyle, set a time frame that you’re going to commit to before you hit the road for real. There’s going to be an adjustment period, so it’s recommended you commit to at least six months. Consider the worst-case scenario: Lastly, ask yourself what the worst-case scenario is. Realistically, it’s that you don’t like living in an RV, you sell it, and you move back into a stationary home. Doesn’t sound like the end of the world, does it? In fact, it sounds exactly like what you were doing before. Cara at @caraostara is a full-time RVer who has experienced the lifestyle both alone and with a partner. After realizing her successful career was no longer making her happy, she took a chance to pursue solo RV life. Now in her third year of living this n Photo courtesy of @caraostara, via Instagram Finally, here are a few parting words of advice from those we interviewed: If this lifestyle was easy, everyone would do it. That means there will be challenges. If you think it’ll make you happy despite those challenges, do it. Fears of the unknown are normal, and you may simply be fearful that it’s unknown. The more you educate yourself, the less scary things will be. RV life isn’t for everyone, but it says a lot about a person if they’re considering this lifestyle. If there’s something inside of you that makes you want to do it, chances are pretty high you’re going to like it. It’s important you remember why you’re getting into this lifestyle. The highs are going to be high, but the lows are going to be low. Remember your why throughout it all. Society doesn't set you up to live in an RV full time, so things will never feel exactly right. Because of this, you’ll never feel perfectly ready. You just have to make the leap. SPONSORED BY Carefully crafted collaboratively between GEICO, Budget Travel and Lonely Planet. Both parties provided research and curated content to produce this story. We disclose when information isn’t ours.

    Sponsored by GEICO
    Inspiration

    How to survive the holidays during a pandemic

    It's tough to know exactly how the holidays will impact the spread and effects of COVID-19, but we can certainly agree the season is unfolding differently this 2020. There's a lot to know about what is going on this year and not entirely in ways you expect. This article will take you through all the ways COVID might make the holidays tougher, what to know, and what to do. In America, loneliness and isolation affect the health of millions across the country. The Census Bureau started the Household Pulse Survey, to capture the impact of COVID-19 on mental and economic health. Even before the pandemic, loneliness links to poorer health conditions for at-risk individuals. Last year alone, 47 million people reported having a mental illness. The added physical, mental, financial, and social burdens of COVID-19 make the stress, worry and isolation of this holiday season particularly tough. If you are grieving a loss... There will be many families grieving their first holiday without a loved one this year. It’s essential to recognize emotions will run high. Parents and children tend to want to close themselves off or "be brave," but with normalcy being so hard to come by, this might not help families cope. It is okay to process slowly or intensely as families struggle with unprecedented circumstances and uncertainty. Things to consider: Think about having a virtual meeting with all family members involved to see where everyone stands in participating in the holidays this year. Helping to set a level of expectation can give you some footing. Then discuss ways to honor your loved one. How did they usually contribute to the holiday spirit? Can you honor that in some way? It's important to stay connected. Social isolation during the pandemic makes this more challenging to attain but much more important. The loss of routine: Even without losing a loved one to the pandemic, doesn't necessarily mean you aren't grieving. Mayo Clinic discusses how the loss of routine can also be upsetting and debilitating. It is important to give yourself space to cope with this type of coronavirus grief. While we have been dealing with this for roughly six months now, the holiday season poses a new wave of emotions. Firsts, no matter what, are difficult. What to do: Dr. M. Katherine Shear, founding director of the Center for Complicated Grief at Columbia University, suggests using the tenants of the serenity prayer. Since traditional forms of processing and moving through the death of a loved one, like funeral services or shivas, aren't taking place right now, the prayer helps you accept the things you cannot change. It is important to your wellbeing to ground yourself amid all of this uncertainty. Go back to things that align with your values or make you feel deeply connected to others or the world. If you or someone you know is at risk for suicide... According to JAMA psychology research, suicide rates in the United States have increased over 35% since 1999 and adds to another global health crisis. Unfortunately, data around suicide, due to stigma and lack of national reporting systems, don’t reflect real-time data. There is no way to know the immediate effect of COVID-19 on suicide numbers in the US or anywhere else. However, psychologists are worried about "several risk factors linked to the pandemic." COVID-19 Risk Factors: The decline in mental or physical health, social isolation and loneliness already indicate potential for difficulty. Struggling with suicidal ideation can be made worse with financial losses, the disruption of daily life like remote work or school, loss of loved ones or milestones and increased alcohol consumption. In the US, an increase to the availability of drugs or firearms from sheltering in place is also cause for concern. What to do: Suicidal thoughts make you or your loved one's health an emergency. Some signs include extreme mood swings from being very sad to very calm, talking about hopelessness or feeling trapped, feeling there aren't any solutions, and talking about dying. If you or a loved one seem off or more isolated than normal, it is essential to reach out. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Lifeline) at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or text the Crisis Text Line (text HELLO to 741741). If you are a friend or family member, follow the National Institute of Mental Health's five steps: ask them directly if they are thinking about suicide, keep them safe by reducing their access to harmful means; be there to listen; help them connect to a therapist or a hotline; lastly, stay connected. Research suggests talking about suicide can actually help to reduce it. If you or someone you know might experience domestic violence... The stay-at-home orders made to protect the public concerns domestic abuse advocates that victims will be trapped with their abusers. The limited mobility and heightened uncertainty can lead to more triggers and increase abuse. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, domestic violence hotlines expected to see an increase in activity during quarantine, but actually, the calls decreased by nearly fifty percent. This concerns experts even more to know the rates of violence aren't decreasing, but actually, victims are unable to find a safe way to get help. Risk factors amid COVID-19: Hotels and shelters long provided alternative and emergent housing, but with closures, safe havens are harder to find. Domestic violence disproportionately affects minority women of color; 1 in 4 women experience intimate partner violence (IPV). Before COVID, unstable childcare, financial hardships, unsafe housing, or lack of social support can increase risk, but now, these are a given. The pandemic seriously limits a victim's financial independence to get out of the situation safely. Many families hold "essential jobs" and don't have childcare capabilities to get their kids connected for school. This added stress can lead to instances of child abuse too. What to do: Most people don't seek help when suffering from IPV. If you think you've experienced abusive behavior, the National Domestic Violence Hotline can help you identify abuse and a safe plan of action. This holiday, make it a mission to check in on the ones you love. Often victims of violence will isolate themselves from fear or shame. If you suspect abuse happening to your neighbor or friend, keep a journal of anything you've seen or heard to provide evidence if they ever choose to prosecute. Calling the police isn't always a good idea. Read more about why here. Instead, you should make a call to a local or state violence center for further steps. If you’re struggling to stay sober... Retail alcohol sales increased roughly 40% at brick and mortar establishments after bars and restaurants closed for stay-at-home orders. According to Winsight Grocery Business, online sales for alcohol skyrocketed at 339%. Alcohol misuse is already a public health concern across the US. COVID-19 may worsen these behaviors long after the pandemic. The director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism said we could look at other catastrophic stressors like 9/11 or Hurricane Katrina. During times of stress, the added anxiety and uncertainty of the future can lead people to consume more alcohol. Risk factors amid COVID-19: Consuming alcohol in larger quantities will affect your immune system and the body's ability to fight viral infections, especially in the lungs. Drinking alcohol to cope with stress, sleep disturbances, and even boredom increases the chance for alcohol use disorder. Recovering alcoholics live with their condition daily. Over 2 million members participate in Alcoholics Anonymous and well over 100,000 groups worldwide. Recovery takes a wide network of social support. With social distancing, a lot of this has gone away, but there are still things to do and ways to help. What to do: There are online AA meetings available like the Token Shop. Finding ways to connect with friends and family, even your sponsor, will help keep you grounded. These interactions are vital to stay safe these holidays. Whether you are struggling with diagnosed alcohol use disorder or not, be aware of new triggers. Be mindful of your mental health. If money is really tight this year... Many Americans were struggling to make ends meet before the pandemic, but a record number of 40 million Americans filed for unemployment during April. The long-term impact of COVID will show families facing worse financial burdens, the ability to get a job or make ends meet, foreclosures, and evictions in the months to come. There is no worse time to deal with money stress than during the holidays. Risk factors among COVID: Minorities are disproportionately more affected with financial burden caused by the pandemic. Families struggling to make ends meet and are also trying to put their kids through online schooling. They are struggling to make it work. There are roughly 42 million Americans without access to the internet at home. Because of social distancing and closures, many people have difficulty finding work, going to school, teaching their kids, and staying connected without the internet. What to do: Ask for help. There are organizations and nonprofits set up to help families provide gifts to their children during the holidays. Keep your holiday small. Keep your kids' priorities focused on family and find other ways to show them support. In turn, this might relieve some of your own stress because you would have found ways to cope and participate in self care. While the white house is still working on another stimulus bill, there are other programs that cab help. Food Stamps can help alleviate some stress when grocery shopping. There are also programs helping to reduce internet costs.

    Road Trips

    The best Pacific Northwest road trip

    Two major vacation-planning questions pop up again and again: City or country? Ocean or mountains? But there are places where the answer to both questions is, “Yes, yes, yes, and yes.” America’s Pacific Northwest may be the best example, boasting Pacific beaches and the coastal mountain range, the cities of Seattle and Portland, gorgeous rivers and forests, and the decidedly cool little city of Boise, in the foothills of the Rockies. Ready to get started? Here, a step-by-step itinerary that’ll take you across one of the US’s most rewarding regions. Seattle Kick off your Pacific Northwest road trip in Seattle, Washington, where you’ll indulge in fresh seafood, legendary coffee, sea kayaking, and more. Pike Place Market is iconic and busy but worth a visit for fresh fish and other culinary delights – strolling and shooting pics is free. Don’t miss Seattle’s cool museums, including the rotating exhibits and excellent guided tours at the Frye Art Museum, the world-class collection at the Seattle Art Museum, and the immense (and immensely impressive) works to be found in Olympic Sculpture Park. See the full list: 51 affordable discoveries across America 2020 Speaking of parks, Seattle’s ample green spaces deserve to monopolize much of your time here; from the little Waterfall Garden Park in the city’s Pioneer Square section to the 500+ acres of forests and beaches of Discovery Park, you’ll have to remind yourself you’re still in town. And for dramatic panoramic views, forgo a trip to the Space Needle and instead head to Kerry Park or Queen Anne Hill. If you plan to spend a night or more in Seattle before hitting the road, downtown’s Hotel Max has a convenient location for walking to major sights and its stylish rooms are the perfect place to rest up before hitting the road. The Hoh Rain Forest in Olympic National Park is one of the largest temperate rainforests in the US © maislam / Getty Images Olympic National Park From Seattle, you’ll hit I-5 South, then 101 North as you arc around the bottom of Puget Sound and then up the Olympic Peninsula, a two-hour drive to one of the National Park Service’s lesser known but utterly unforgettable destinations: Olympic National Park. Here, visitors can indulge in miles of Pacific coast, exploring the one of the US’s last temperate rainforests, and ogling the coastal peaks on easily accessible hiking trails. Comfortable lodging within the park includes Kalaloch Lodge, with rooms starting well under $150/night; the nearby charming town of Port Angeles also boasts an array of affordable properties. In March and April, Portland's cherry blossom trees explode in a riot of pink © EchoGolf Photography / Shutterstock Portland From the Olympic Peninsula, you’ll dip into Oregon: take I-5 South for the three-hour drive to Portland’s exceptional food scene and parks. For those who put eating at the top of their travel to-do list, Portland is an epicenter of yum. For retro-chic ambience and beef and martinis, reserve a table at Clyde’s Prime Rib; explore the city’s penchant for the artisanal at its countless craft breweries, charcuterie and cheese shops, an array of affordable and tasty food trucks. And, much like Seattle but on a smaller scale, Portland boasts parks, including Mt. Tabor and Forest Park, that’ll keep any visitor busy for days, and a bike-sharing program with dozens of stations makes it all the easier to explore. You’ll love Jupiter Hotel, an upscale riff on a mid-century motor lodge in the city’s Lower Burnside neighborhood, with affordable, pop-art-informed rooms. The Columbia River Gorge offers splendid vistas around every bend in the river © Zack Frank / Shutterstock Columbia River Gorge From Portland, you’ll pass in and out of Oregon and Washington along I-84 East and WA-14 for about a half-hour on your way to indulge in a journey along the Columbia River Gorge, with its ample scenic turn-offs and nearby world-class wineries. The Cascade Mountains serve as your scenic backdrop as the river cuts its way through the range on its way to the Pacific; keep an eye out for waterfalls within sight of the highway and consider pulling off for mountain biking and hiking. If you’re planning to spend a night or two, impressive nearby properties such as Westcliff Lodge and Columbia Gorge Hotel & Spa offer reliable, wallet-friendly lodging. And spending the night allows you to make time for sipping some of the region’s exceptional pinot noirs, chardonnays, and other wines. Bustling Boise features many downtown events, such as the Boise Farmers Market in late spring © Darwin Fan / Getty Images Boise Boise, Idaho, will welcome you with its array of funky downtown shops, mountain trails in the foothills of the Rockies accessible right from town, and an overall design-forward vibe. From the Columbia River Gorge, take I-84 East for the five-hour drive. (If you’re looking for a stop in between to break up your ride, consider Baker City, Oregon, which features a restored downtown, carriage rides, and the bordering Elkhorn and Wallowa mountains.) In downtown Boise, you’ll love shopping at one-of-a-kind establishments that offer vintage finds, local-themed books, and artisanal treasures such as barrel-aged vinegar and olive oil. While strolling, keep an eye out for public art, which the city has made a priority, including a tree crafted from scraps of metal and other projects that enliven the streets. If you’re visiting in April through December, stop by the Capital City Central Market for an incredible array of Idaho-made crafts and foods. And we absolutely love how the Modern Hotel and Bar offer art-inspired rooms and a restaurant that draws on diverse French and North African influences, all in an upgraded former motel with rooms starting under $150/night. The Snake River Valley is two hours from Boise and features breathtaking views © Robert Alexander / Getty Snake River Valley Cap off your road trip by discovering Idaho’s Snake River Valley – a two-hour drive from Boise along I-84 East – where a visit to the 500ft-high Perrine Bridge spanning the Snake River Canyon will take your breath away. Explore the canyon’s south rim along a paved trail, and don’t miss one of the most Instagram-worthy sights on this trip, Shoshone Falls. Bunk down in nearby Twin Falls, where there are several reliable motel chains that offer good value. Produced by Budget Travel for GEICO. All editorial views are those of Budget Travel alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality.

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    How to road trip New England on a budget

    The United States start in these six rugged states. And when British explorer Captain John Smith explored New England’s shores in the early 1600s, he grasped the charm and resilience of his surroundings – and officially made it the birthplace of a nation. Of course, in addition to all its fascinating history, this northeast corner of the country is a hotbed of beautiful nature, culture and family-friendly entertainment – encompassing a spectacular culinary scene and a wide variety of affordable accommodations to discover and enjoy. Want to spend more time exploring this diverse and distinct region? Here’s a blueprint to a reasonably priced road trip in New England – from Portland, Maine, to Mystic, Connecticut. From winding trails of the Appalachian Mountains, including eight mountains over 14,000ft in elevation, to the splendor of New Hampshire’s wild coastlines, you won’t have to miss a thing. Portland, Maine Come for the lobster, stay for… well, everything else. Portland might be Maine’s largest city, but you’ll be able to appreciate the craggy shorelines and secluded beaches as well as the preservation of the historic, yet quaint, Old Port district. The stunningly well-kept Portland Head Light is the oldest lighthouse in the state and is surrounded by the 90-acre Fort Williams Park, where you can hike, bike, picnic or sit by the beach. See the full list: 51 affordable discoveries across America 2020 Ready for some culture? The Tate House Museum whisks you to Maine’s pre-revolutionary times, and the Portland Museum of Art, founded in 1882, is sprawled over three buildings – one designed by the late “starchitect” I.M. Pei. The dining scene is vibrant, and you can indulge in inventive small plates at Central Provisions, where most entrees are under $15, and $6 craft cocktails at the Portland Hunt + Alpine Club’s Happy Hour. Of course, if its seafood you’re after, don’t miss the brown butter lobster roll at Eventide Oyster Co. The Press Hotel offers fun, boutique accommodations in the same building which housed the Portland Press Herald until the newspaper moved offices in 2010. Maine's High Peaks Region is stunning at any time of year, but during the fall it really shines © Holcy / iStock / Getty Images Plus High Peaks Region, Maine Just over two hours’ drive from Portland along I-295 is this stunning, family-friendly destination with 10 mountain peaks over 4000ft. Perfect in any season, you’ll also be dazzled by its glacial lakes and clear rivers. If you want a scenic drive, take some time to tour its scenic byways, like High Peaks and Grafton Notch, which will give you a quicker way to view the spectacular surrounding mountains. Water sports include pontoon boat rides, fly fishing, kayaking and swimming – though it’s also well known for its ski resorts, Sugarloaf and Saddleback Mountain. The town of Stratton is the perfect place to refuel and relax, and you can grab some comforting yet inexpensive options at the Looney Moose Café or head for burgers at the White Wolf Inn and Restaurant. The Mountain View Motel offers cozy rooms with full kitchen, and even allows furry friends to join you on your adventures. Though there is a lack of amenities, like a pool or restaurant, this motel makes up for it by offering gorgeous views and super-low room rates. Bucolic lakes and cottages await you in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom © DenisTangneyJr / E+ / Getty Northeast Kingdom, Vermont Head westward on State Route 16 to enter this out-of-the-way, northernmost region of Vermont. Shimmied up against the Canadian border and the upper Connecticut River, it’s known for its peaceful splendor. Taking up approximately one-fifth of the land and over a quarter of The Green Mountain State, you can explore its over 200 lakes and ponds while also appreciating the accompanying dense forests and eight state parks. Bikers, hikers and backpackers flock to this region to hit the Kingdom Heritage Trail system, which includes the Bluff Mountain Community and Gore Mountain Trail, while other adventure seekers might head to gape at Troy’s Big Falls, a monstrous undammed waterfall which includes a sheer cliff face of over 80ft. Burke Mountain offers downhill and cross-country skiing with over 200 inches of annual snowfall as well as views of the geologically profound Willoughby Gap (kids ski free in March). Country cooking is on the menu at the Peacham Café, housed in a former firehouse while the more seasonal Mike’s Tiki Bar offers cocktails and 30 beers on tap under its thatched roof, with hearty grub from partner Vermont Food Truck as an accompaniment. For budget travelers, the Willoughvale Inn and Cottages offers calm, stunning landscapes and a little history, with its accommodations named after historical figures and places, like The Robert Frost suite or The Songadeewin Lakeview Cottage. New Hampshire's diminutive coastline packs many surprises © mountinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus Seacoast and Portsmouth, New Hampshire From the Northeast Kingdom, head southbound on I-93, swinging left in Manchester, New Hampshire, to arrive at this state’s miniscule coastline. Enjoying an intoxicating mix of culture and maritime activities, this region straddles Maine and includes ownership of the Isles of Shoals and Star Islands. The entire Seacoast region covers 18 miles of the Atlantic Ocean, but head to Hampton Beach for family fun as well as a dazzling white-sand beach. Don’t want to go too far to lay your head? Room at Ashworth by the Sea, run under $150 a night, and the property features a heated pool with retractable roof to keep the kids happy as well as three different restaurants for breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails. Portsmouth, near the mouth of the Piscataqua River, is the country’s third oldest city and is an excellent jumping-off point for the living history of the Strawbery Banke Museum, the American Independence Museum and the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. The dining scene is varied and abundant, and you can enjoy a more upscale, locally sourced meal at the Black Trumpet Bistro or head to Ceres Bakery for an affordable, casual selection of soup, salad, sandwiches and an array of homemade pastries. Stay at the lovingly renovated Hotel Portsmouth, a former 1881 mansion with vintage charm and free continental breakfast. Falmouth is sometimes overlooked on a trip to Cape Cod, but it's worth a stop © Kenneth Wiedemann / E+ / Getty Falmouth, Massachusetts Take I-495 southbound to loop around Boston (or stop in for a bit if you have the time) and arrive in Cape Cod and the pretty little town of Falmouth, Massachusetts. This official Preserve America community was also the residence of Katharine Lee Bates, the author of treasured tune, “America the Beautiful.” History aside, this serene corner of southwest Cape Cod is also home to over 70 miles of ocean shores, eight distinct villages and the Shining Sea Bike Path, with nearly 11 miles spanning farms, ponds, cranberry bogs and even salt marshes, spitting you into the village of Woods Hole. Here, you can not only catch the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard, but also tour the marine science facilities and aquarium at the world-famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Head to Old Silver Beach for swimming in the calm, blue waters and views of Buzzards Bay and stay for the summer seafood dinners and vibrant sunsets at the beachfront Sea Crest Beach Hotel. Falmouth also offers further budget accommodations at Admiralty Inn & Suites and The Red Horse Inn, both of which have rooms for under $100 per night. Even if you've had your fill of lighthouses by now, you can never get enough fiery sunsets © Shobeir Ansari © Moment / Getty Narragansett, Rhode Island Trace the coastline westbound to arrive at this quaint and quirky seaside surf destination in Rhode Island, which offers access to smaller state park beaches like Roger Wheeler and Salty Brine. There you can watch the boats and local fishers, as well as the reliably vigorous waves of Narragansett Town Beach. Take a surf lesson from Warm Winds Surf Shop or just relax on the sand – or hop on the Block Island Ferry to do a little maritime exploring, including the Point Judith Light, a working lighthouse built in 1857. Because this is New England, historical landmarks abound and you can visit the 23ft Narragansett Indian Monument, carved from a single Douglas fir tree on Kingstown Road. To fully appreciate your surroundings here, tuck into the local seafood , and Aunt Carrie’s is known for its golden fried clam cakes ($5 for a half dozen) and chowders. The Anchor Motel is a budget-friendly choice, with 15 rooms directly across from Scarborough State Beach. Mystic Seaport is a great stop for families © Photo by Brian T. Evans / Moment / Getty Mystic Seaport, Connecticut No, cult favorite coming-of-age flick Mystic Pizza wasn’t actually filmed at its namesake restaurant in this sweet, seaside hamlet less than an hour west of Narragansett on US Route 1. But if you pop in for a slice and a selfie, you won’t want to miss the rest of this village situated along the Mystic River. Bluff Point State Park is home to over 800 acres of lush land for hiking, biking and fishing, and the historic district straddling the river has something for everyone, including the still-working Bascule Bridge built in 1920. The popular Mystic Aquarium was recently certified by the American Humane Conservation and makes a welcome home to sea lions, penguins and even sharks, while the Mystic Seaport Museum concentrates more on history, with a working preservation shipyard and recreated 19th-century village to explore. Ford’s Lobster is an affordable, BYOB treasure on the water, featuring fresh lobsters as well as lobster roll and lobster bisque. Stay at The Whaler’s Inn in downtown Mystic, comprised of five different buildings, each housing rooms and suites with a nautical theme. Produced by Lonely Planet for GEICO. All editorial views are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality.

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    How to road trip the Midwest on a budget

    Defined by wide-open swathes of farmland, friendly small towns and attractive urban cities (not to mention the bonus of much lower prices for gas and lodging than you’d expect to pay on the coasts), this down-to-earth territory holds all the makings of a memorable road trip. St. Louis, Missouri With affordable attractions, tasty food and river city culture, St. Louis makes a great starting point to kick off a Midwestern road trip. At 630ft, the iconic Gateway Arch is required viewing, and America’s tallest man-made monument. The CityArchRiver project recently revamped the land that surrounds the landmark, updating facilities and adding green space and bike trails. Take the tram ride to the top for the best bird’s eye view in town, or catch a ride to cruise the mighty Mississippi on a paddlewheel-powered riverboat (snagging an America the Beautiful Pass will save you a few bucks on ticket prices). During baseball season, Busch Stadium and Ballpark Village come alive with avid Cardinals fans rooting for the home team. Even if you’re not attending the game, the sports energy in town is contagious. Site of the 1904 World’s Fair, 1300-acre Forest Park is a one-stop cultural cache that includes museums, a zoo, a science center, a greenhouse, lakes and pedestrian paths — all free to access. There’s no charge to tour the historic Anheuser-Busch Brewery grounds and admire the Budweiser Clydesdales either. After exploring, sample some classic fried ravioli at any of the old-school Italian restaurants on the Hill and order up some ice cream or frozen custard at Ted Drewe’s. See the full list: 51 affordable discoveries across America 2020 Hop on Route 66 to get your kicks © Flash Parker / Moment / Getty Route 66 Heritage Project, Illinois Get your kicks! Gearing up to celebrate its centennial in 2026, America’s Mother Road accounts for 300 miles of scenic byway on its Central Illinois leg between St. Louis and Chicago, (running 2,400 all told out to California). Meet up with Route 66 by crossing the Mississippi River at the Chain of Rocks Bridge and make a day of it heading northeast to take in the scenery through Litchfield, Springfield, Bloomington/Normal and Pontiac. Commemorate the journey by snapping selfies against Americana-rich backdrops like the 30ft Gemini Giant at Wilmington’s Launching Pad drive-in, Paul Bunyon holding a hot dog in Atlanta and the Joliet Correctional Center where Jake and Elwood served time in the Blues Brothers. Hole up in a mom-and-pop motel if you need a break from the long day of driving, and keep your own motor running with a pit stop to refuel at Dell Rhea’s Chicken Basket in Willowbrook. A mix of museums and public art await you in Chicago © roman_slavik / Shutterstock Chicago, IL Route 66 ultimately deposits travelers in Chicago at the end of the road. A two-time World’s Fair host, the Windy City delivers a winning combination of history, sports, food and culture, inviting visitors to stick around and explore for as long as they like. Take your pick of Museum Campus attractions like the Shedd Aquarium, Adler Planetarium and the Field Museum, then venture north up Michigan Avenue to the renowned Art Institute of Chicago. Hot tip: a CityPASS packages these and a couple other top attractions to save visitors 50% on premium admission prices across the board. After strolling through Millennium Park and taking a few photos at the Bean, take a spin on the Ferris wheel at Navy Pier and window-shop your way up the Magnificent Mile. Chicago boasts a strong theater community with performing arts showcases, concerts and events happening every night of the week, often with last-minute or day-of ticket discounts available. You definitely won’t lack for great eats, whether you opt to indulge in affordable local favorites like deep-dish pizza, Chicago-style hot dogs and global cuisine galore, or splurge on a high-end meal at one of the city’s finest dining establishments. Milwaukee is a former Rust Belt city with a under-the-radar food and drink scene © Visit Milwaukee / JMKE Photography Milwaukee, Wisconsin From Chicago, it’s just a quick 90-minute journey north up I-94/I-41 to Milwaukee, a town that manages to stay humble while still impressing visitors with its style and substance. The Harley-Davidson Museum is a pilgrimage destination for legions of brand-loyal customers. After a visit, learn all about the city’s beer heritage with a tour of Miller Brewery or Sprecher Brewery. You’ll need something to eat, and wholesome dairy is what’s on the menu (this is Wisconsin, after all), namely in the form of cheese curds, butter burgers and frozen custard. Milwaukee’s Public Market in the Third Ward offers a one-stop opportunity to sample it all under one roof. When the weather’s nice, the river and lakefront encourage locals and visitors to get outside and enjoy some water recreation. Meanwhile, the Milwaukee Art Museum (the Santiago Calatrava-designed “wings” that fan open and shut twice a day are a free show in and of themselves), a reputable repertory theater and a rocking roster of summer festivals keep Milwaukee solidly rooted in the arts. At the end of the day, the historic (and haunted?) Pfister Hotel proposes stylish confines in which to rest your weary head. Visiting Lambeau Field packed with Green Bay fans is an experience like nothing else © Brenda Spaude Green Bay, Wisconsin Keep on trucking up I-43 for about two hours and join “the Pack” in Green Bay, Wisconsin’s oldest settled community where pro football reigns supreme. Don some green and yellow to show your loyalty for raucous tailgating at the 80,000+ seat Lambeau Field; the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, tours of the stadium and the Titletown entertainment district next door are available all year long. Sports aren’t the only attraction here, though — breathtaking hiking territory abounds with landscapes that show off dolomite cliffs, waterfalls and beachfronts. Made from hearty stock, Green Bay residents don’t shy away from the long cold winters, opting instead to make the most of the season with ice skating, tubing, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. You can always thaw out in front of any of the local restaurants, cafes and brewpubs that feature cozy fireplaces. Or, belly up to a local bar for a good old traditional Friday-night Wisconsin fish fry. Duluth, Minnesota It’s a five-hour jaunt across S.R. 29 to Chippewa Falls and then up US 53 over the Minnesota state line into Duluth. Along the idyllic banks of Lake Superior, the great outdoors are alive and well here, especially during the fall when the Northwoods foliage bursts into spectacular shades of burnished orange, red and gold. Settled by the Sioux and Chippewa tribes, the city now serves as entrance to the North Shore Scenic Drive that runs 154 miles up to Grand Portage, just shy of the Canadian border. The Aerial Lift Bridge is Duluth’s crown-jewel landmark, raising and lowering nearly two dozen times each day to accommodate the passage of ships and boats traveling into and out of the harbor. The Canal Park district appeals to visitors with charming local restaurants to frequent and the Lakewalk to wander. Gooseberry Falls is one of Minnesota's best parks © Explore Minnesota / Micah Kvidt Gooseberry Falls State Park, Minnesota From Duluth, follow the North Shore Scenic Byway 40 miles northeast past glimpses of the lake, forests and rock formations to wind down the journey at Gooseberry Falls, one of Minnesota’s most stunning state parks. Stretch your legs with a walk around the Falls View Loop to drink in the namesake Upper, Middle and Lower cascades. A slice of cherry crunch or French Silk at Betty’s Pies in nearby Two Harbors makes the perfect sweet finale. You might also like: Midwest travel ideas: 8 under-the-radar destinations to visit in America’s HeartlandHow to road-trip Canada on a budgetAudiobooks to narrate your US road trip Produced by Budget Travel for GEICO. All editorial views are those of Budget Travel alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality.

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    DESTINATION IN Missouri

    Kansas City

    Kansas City (abbreviated KC or KCMO) is the largest city in Missouri by population and area. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city had a population of 508,090 in 2020, and was the 36th most-populous city in the United States as of the 2020 census. It is the most populated municipality and historic core city of the Kansas City metropolitan area, which straddles the Kansas–Missouri state line and has a population of 2,192,035. Most of the city lies within Jackson County, but portions spill into Clay, Cass, and Platte counties. Kansas City was founded in the 1830s as a Missouri River port at its confluence with the Kansas River coming in from the west. On June 1, 1850, the town of Kansas was incorporated; shortly after came the establishment of the Kansas Territory. Confusion between the two ensued, and the name Kansas City was assigned to distinguish them soon after. Sitting on Missouri's western boundary with Kansas, with Downtown near the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, the city encompasses about 319.03 square miles (826.3 km2), making it the 23rd largest city by total area in the United States. It serves as one of the two county seats of Jackson County, along with major suburb Independence. Other major suburbs include the Missouri cities of Blue Springs and Lee's Summit and the Kansas cities of Overland Park, Olathe, and Kansas City, Kansas. The city is composed of several neighborhoods, including the River Market District in the north, the 18th and Vine District in the east, and the Country Club Plaza in the south. Celebrated cultural traditions include Kansas City jazz, theater which was the center of the Vaudevillian Orpheum circuit in the 1920s, the Chiefs and Royals sports franchises, and famous cuisine based on Kansas City-style barbecue, Kansas City strip steak, and craft breweries. The city was ranked as a gamma- global city in 2020 by GaWC.