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    Red River,

    New Mexico

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    Red River is a resort town in Taos County, New Mexico, located in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The population was 477 at the 2010 census. Red River is located along the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, and is 36 miles (58 km) from Taos.
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    Budget Travel Lists

    The 6 Best Places to See Fall Colors

    Don’t mourn the end of summer. Swap out that bathing suit for a sweater, ice cream for apples, and make a date with mother nature to ponder the stunning colors of America’s fall foliage. Given the overwhelming number of parks, mountains and forests to choose from, finding the right time and place to see these vibrant displays may seem overwhelming. To get you started, we’ve rounded up six of the best places to enjoy fall’s impressive hues. And though there is an estimated time for peak viewing, it’s all about the weather, so you may want to check the Farmer’s Almanac and The Weather Channel for a quick update before you head out. Catskills, NY New York is one of the most popular states to get a full glimpse of seasonal colors. And this mountain range in the state’s southeast corner is close enough to New York City to drive, train or bus to in just a few short hours. The optimal viewing time in the Catskills is the end of September through October and though you can’t miss the breathtaking changes wherever you end up, we suggest a drive to the Kaaterskill Clove Experience, a hike to Mount Utsayantha or a trip aboard the Catskill Mountain Railroad. Weekend events, like the Hunter Mountain Oktoberfest and the Taste of the Catskills, are a great way to extend your foliage excursion and mix it up with both locals and tourists. Gettysburg, PA Combine your autumn viewing with some American history this season and head to Gettysburg around the third week of October until mid-November to enjoy peak foliage. The Gettysburg National Military Park and the top of the battlefield Little Round Top affords flamboyant views all the way to the Blue Ridge Mountains. You can also choose to see the changing leaves on horseback from the National Riding Stables Horse Rescue or Hickory Hollow Farm, take a drive through Pennsylvania’s Apple Country or visit the Hauser Estate Winery for a taste of wine and hard cider, as well as a view from one of the region’s highest points. The National Apple Harvest Festival runs through the first two weekends of October and will give you a good reason to stay and enjoy the food, crafts, entertainment and, you know, all those apples. Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, NM The mountains of northern New Mexico are a highlight for leaf gazing aficionados during the first few weeks of October, and this dreamily named route provides an 83-mile loop of what the southwest autumn has to offer. The drive is approximately three hours, though you’ll want to factor in time for stops along the way. The byway begins and ends in the artists’ colony Taos and makes its way through Questa, Red River, Eagle’s Nest and Angel Fire. The sundry scenery includes Taos Pueblo, which houses the country’s first memorial to Vietnam vets, as well as Wheeler Peak, New Mexico’s tallest point, and Taos Ski Valley where you can enjoy the vivid views on a hike, bike or ski lift. Lake of the Ozarks, MS Mid- to late-October is the best tome to see the Ozarks hardwood forests and rolling hills burn with scarlet, ginger and gold on this vast shoreline ­– though it could easily stretch into November with an abundance of cool sunny days. Unfolding across four counties, this summer getaway comes alive in the fall, and there are plenty of ways to enjoy the brilliant scenery in the surrounding Ozark Hills. Take a drive through the Sylamore District of the Ozark National Forest, stop at the Ameren Scenic Overlook, survey the surroundings with a round of golf at the Margaritaville Lake Resort or hop on a boat at Celebration Cruises to see the sites from the water. Columbia River Gorge, OR With over 80 miles of brightly tinted forests to gawk at, this scenic area located along Interstate 84 is at its peak for fall foliage from mid-September to mid-October. The drive is parallel to the Columbia River, but be sure to stop at the Crown Point Vista House for more expansive views of the Cascade Mountains or consider a hike on the popular Dog Mountain Loop. Take a cheeky break for a beverage and panoramic vistas at one of the Gorge wineries or breweries or book a white water rafting trip down the Columbia River to liven things up. Kancamagus Highway, NH This 34-mile drive, nicknamed the Kanc by locals, provides an explosion of brilliant colored leaves come mid-September and lasting through early October. Because this highway cuts through the White Mountain National Forest, there are plenty of points to pull off and enjoy the breathtaking views. The Sabbaday Falls includes a 45ft drop and perfect picnicking options and you can stop at the Lost River Gorge and Boulder Caves to wander off on a hike. Or hop on the 80-passenger cable car at the Cannon Mountain Aerial Tramway to see the spectacular foliage from the air – all the way to Maine, Vermont and Canada.

    Inspiration

    Live Like a Local in Kentucky

    When it comes to a room with a view, an array of cultural offerings that includes folk art and bluegrass music, and a culinary legacy that dates back centuries, we love all that Kentucky has to offer. Consider this a taste of your next great vacation. Cultural Heritage Say the words culture and Kentucky and, of course, Louisville springs to mind, with its justly renowned Louisville Ballet and Actors Theatre of Louisville each drawing devoted audiences for its world-class performances. But in Kentucky, culture is as varied and welcoming as the state itself. When it comes to folk art, travelers must include a stop in Berea, the “arts and crafts capital of Kentucky,” for exceptional pottery, weaving, art galleries, and even hand-made musical instruments (more about Kentucky music a little later). The vibrant city of Paducah, designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as a City of Crafts and Folk Art, is another must see. Speaking of crafts, no trip to Kentucky would be complete without exploring the craft of distilling distinctive, local bourbon, not to mention sipping a traditional Old Fashioned cocktail, invented in Louisville. Stop by some (or all!) of Kentucky’s thirteen major distilleries by taking the Kentucky Bourbon Trail® Road Trip. Or dive into Louisville’s own special distilling scene on the Urban Bourbon Trail®, or get to know small-batch distillers along the Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour®. Whichever bourbon experience (and Budget Travel’s editors recommend exploring at least a bit of each while visiting Bourbon Country), you’ll return home with a sense of history, craft, and, almost certainly, a taste for Kentucky’s famous libation. Kentucky’s history doesn’t stop at art and spirits, of course. After all, this is where Abraham Lincoln was born, and you can visit the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park, in Hodgenville. The state is also home to significant Civil War forts and battlefields, sites dedicated to African American and Native American history and culture, and opportunities to learn about Kentucky’s importance to the coal industry, both past and present. Wherever you happen to be on your Kentucky trip, you’re never far from vibrant small towns where U.S. history rubs elbows with cutting-edge imagination and creativity. The horse lovers in your brood (and that certainly includes all of us at Budget Travel) will want to spend some time getting to know the equine side of Kentucky. Make a “pilgrimage” to Keeneland, in Lexington, or Churchill Downs, in Louisville, or visit one of the state’s many horse farms open to visitors. The Kentucky Horse Park may be the best place to immerse yourself in Horse Country, where you can tour the Hall of Champions, visit the International Museum of the Horse and attend various events and shows. Music While Kentucky was nicknamed the Bluegrass State for the lush, thick grass that grows in its north central regions, the name bluegrass naturally also calls to mind music, and this is one state where you’ll find toe-tapping music traditions alive and well anywhere you turn. Bluegrass music is an incredible musical melting pot of European folk, gospel, and jazz traditions, and you can revel in the music and its history at the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, in Owensboro, and visit the birthplace of the “father of bluegrass,” Bill Monroe, who first gave the music its name and helped bring it to a nationwide audience. Drive the Country Music Highway, along U.S. 23 in eastern Kentucky, to visit the birthplaces of several significant musical luminaries, including Loretta Lynn, the Judds, and Ricky Scaggs; and don’t forget to stop at the Country Music Highway Museum, in Paintsville, and the Country Music Hall of Fame, in Renfro Valley. While we’re on the subject of music, Kentucky’s nightlife extends far beyond bluegrass and country music. If you’re looking for up-and-coming musical acts, drop by a college town like Lexington. For live theater, classical, and jazz, spend an evening out on the town in Louisville, Paducah, or Bowling Green. Eat You know Kentucky will feed you well, and the latest season of Top Chef, “Better in the Bluegrass,” confirms it, with the popular TV cooking contest held right here in the Bluegrass State. Kentucky food varies from region to region, and, in our experience, taking a food tour of as many regions as possible is the best way to savor it all. Kentucky’s Bluegrass, Blues & Barbecue region is home to a thriving BBQ scene, including the International BBQ Bar-B-Q Festival each May in Owensboro, the “BBQ Capital of the World.” Treat yourself to “beer cheese” while visiting legendary horse farms in the Bluegrass, Horses, Bourbon & Boone region; this region’s combination of beer and cheese is a tasty dip for chips or crackers, and we’ve even seen locals eat it with a spoon. When visiting Daniel Boone Country, named for the famous pioneer who inspired the Disney TV show, you must try Apple Stack Cake, one of the best-known and best-loved desserts in the Appalachians. Play Thought you may never tire of exploring culture, music, and food in Kentucky, we also recommend that you spend plenty of time outdoors. The Bluegrass State boasts some of America’s finest parkland and other natural attractions, including: Mammoth Cave National Park, the longest cave system in the world, with more than 400 explored miles; Cumberland Falls State Park with its jaw-dropping waterfalls and the incredible “moon-bow” that inspires nighttime visits when the moon is full and the sky is clear; Daniel Boone National Forest, the Red River Gorge, and a vast array of lakes and trails make for nearly infinite opportunities for unforgettable outdoor recreation. Stay Whether your “lodging personality” tends toward a super-comfortable hotel stay with all your needs seen to, a rustic cabin by a secluded lake, an apartment rental in a cool small town, or resort living that makes balancing outdoor adventures with great food and drink as easy as possible, Kentucky has something to fit the bill. Learn more about Kentucky’s cultural heritage, music, food, natural wonders, and lodging at kentuckytourism.com.

    Inspiration

    Locals Know Best: Fargo, North Dakota

    If you’re a student of American trivia, you might know that Fargo, North Dakota’s most populous town, which sits on the Red River Valley of the Great Plains, is named for William Fargo, the founder of the Wells Fargo Express Company. Or you might know that it was referred to as the “Gateway to the West” once the Northern Pacific Railroad was up and running through the area. Or that it was essentially rebuilt after a massive fire decimated 31 downtown blocks in 1893. But chances are everything you know about Fargo you owe to filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, whose 1996 kooky crime drama (and present FX series of the same name) gave the town pop culture street cred. Today, Fargo is an energetic hub of creativity with a youthful vibe. In 2014, Forbes magazine ranked it number four among the fastest-growing small towns in the US. To get the lowdown the town, we checked in with Alicia Underlee Nelson, who curates Prairiestylefile.com, a site that focuses on what's unique and local in the upper Midwest and Canada's prairie provinces. She's also the author of “North Dakota Beer: A Heady History.” She grew up about 45 minutes away and just moved back after 12 years in Minneapolis. She’s seen the difference the relatively few years can make.   ARTS & CRAFTS Fargo’s amazingly well-preserved downtown has undergone changes in the past few years, but none of them have impinged on its historic integrity. Where people once went there for basic shopping needs, it’s evolved into an arts and culture district. The Plains Museum is a major local art institution, what with its collection of 20th and 21st century works. But Alicia always tells people to hit the various galleries when they come to town. Gallery 4, which was established in the 1970s and is one of the oldest coops in town, and the sweeping Ecce Gallery have great openings each month, Alicia notes. Translation? Free party. Both feature regional artists and bill themselves as springboards for new talent. But art here is not constrained to the confines of four walls. Or passive viewing, for that matter. Anyone who has chalk or pastels or spray paint can make his mark on the public art wall, a blast of color tucked away in an alley. “Basically, there are very few rules,” Alicia says about it. There’s a longstanding local pride in time-honored crafts here, too. “North Dakota is not pretentious at all. We’re super-open and welcoming and friendly. There’s a strong tradition of craftsmanship here. A lot of people quilt and paint and make their own furniture. There’s a real appreciation for people who make art,” she says. But if classics crafts aren’t your thing, she’ll point you to Unglued, a shop where you can pick up any and all kinds of modern indie crafts from region. Case in point: upcycled bowties by local artist Ashley N. Dedan, who makes accessories with clothing scraps under the label Aendee. Alicia also recommends downtown institution Zandbroz, a mashup of a bookstore, a variety shop, and jewelry purveyor. Browsing around here might seem akin to poking around a museum of curios. Or you could pick up some local goodies at Sweet Dreams Confections. Go for the homemade fudge, gelato, and sodas, stay for the from-scratch soup and salad at the shop's cozy, chill coffee bar.  READ: Locals Know Best: Savannah Maybe the Coen brothers, who are known for their wacky, if often dark, sense of humor, were drawn to Fargo for its quirk factor, and there are indeed a few unusual places to visit. Alicia calls out Scheels, an outpost of a national sporting goods chain, but this locale features an indoor ferris wheel, shooting games, and--wait for it….. statues of US presidents. “You can go for a ferris wheel ride in the middle of winter. You wouldn’t think it if you were going in to buy basketball shorts, but you can. It’s a strange place,” she said, noting that you might spot a bride and groom getting their wedding photos taken there. It’s also the place to go for North Dakota State University gear. The team plays across the street in the Fargodome, but regardless of whether you’re a football fan, if you’re in town during a weekend game, make sure to hit the tailgate party. “It’s seriously one of the best parties in town. There’s a marching band and free games. Plenty of people don’t go to games, they just go to hang out.” NOW THEY’RE COOKING The creative vibe shines through in the restaurants here, too. Rhombus Guys Pizza might throw you for a loop if you go in expecting you basic average pie. Among their extensive veggie pie options is the tater tots hot dish pizza, which Alicia swears is better than a plate of perfectly fried tater tots. Its upstairs patio is another reason it’s worth visiting. Locals here are obsessed with their patios in the warmer months, which Alicia attributes to the winters being treacherous. Blackbird sits on the slightly less eccentric side, offering wood-fired pizzas that are locally minded down to the flour. (“The guy’s obsessed with dough,” Alicia says.) READ: Locals Know Best: Sacramento For something a bit more high-end, Mezzaluna comes highly recommended. But despite its fine dining appeal, the restaurant also offers excellent late-night happy hour regularly and a midnight brunch on occasion in the colder months. “They announce it online, and it’s worth stalking their website for when they announce it.” Speaking of late-night, no matter how fun it is to get caught up in the hype of trendy restaurants, diners remain a beloved here. Krolls Diner, an outpost of a small chain, is a retro dining car where you can kick back in a sparkly booth and order classic diner grub or German staples, like the beloved knoefla soup. The fact that its website is www.sitdownandeat.com should cue you in to the light humored attitude of this joint and its heavy food. German food is also the star at Wurst Bier Hall, which has tons of beers on tap and communal tables. When your sweet tooth gets the best of you, the best dessert in town are found at Sandy's Donuts, which has two locations in town. “Everyone says their own donut place is the best, but this really is,” Alicia declares. “Just get there early,” she advises. The flavors rotate all the time and include special creations for game days and holidays. There’s also an impressive lunch menu of salads and hot and cold sandwiches at the downtown location. And best of all, each meal comes with a free donut. WHAT’S BREWING In summer 2017, Alicia published her book "North Dakota Beer," so she is intimately acquainted with craft brewers in her hometown and beyond. For an understanding of what’s become a strong craft beer scene in North Dakota, you’ll want to pay a visit to Fargo Brewing Company, the first in town. Located about a 10 minute walk north of downtown, it remains a local favorite, drawing people not only for the excellent beer, but also for the food trucks, the chill industrial vibe, and frequent tasting events. Then later, in 2016, they opened Fargo Brewing Company Ale House in South Fargo where they serve food designed to pair with their brews as well as some quirky bites that only true suds lovers could dream up. Case in point: an ice cream sandwich with the cookie part made with spent grains from the brewery. Drekker Brewing, located right downtown, has a more polished appearance. Alicia recommends taking their grain-to-glass tour, not least because all the proceeds go to charity. The brewers’ interest in artistry extends far beyond beer. Local art adorns the walls in the taproom as well as their packaging. (One of Alicia’s favorite local artists, Punchgut, created the dynamic graffiti-style cans for the brewers.) They also host live music each weekend, game nights, and late-night craft fairs. Needless to say, it’s a lively hangout. And although they only have a small snacks menu, you can plan to stay for a while since they encourage ordering from outside restaurants. Kilstone Brewing is less flashy and more tucked away in a low-profile space in an industrial near the interstate highway. Once you’re inside, though, Alicia says it’s really accessible and, what’s more, "they rock bingo," she declares. Speaking of tucked away, if cocktails are more your speed, The Boiler Room is a chill hotspot that draws revelers for its craft cocktails and creative American fare. The basement locale, which you enter through a back alley, also offers cocktail classes.

    Travel Tips

    Cute Animals Alert

    In a ridiculously adorable new feature, we're spotlighting babies born recently at top U.S. zoos. Speedy red river hog triplets, a 95-pound baby rhino, and an Asian elephant named Mac, who loves splashing in his pool, are a few of the newcomers. Want to know where to spot an okapi? Or how to bypass long lines for a glimpse of panda cub Mei Lan? We've got fun facts, tips for planning a zoo visit, and plenty of photos--just try making it through this slide show without cracking a smile!

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