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    Niagara Falls,

    New York

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    Where Adventure Comes Naturally

    From the iconic Falls themselves to an abundance of outdoor adventures, art and culture, history, wine-ing, dining, and more, Niagara Falls USA offers an incredible array of activities and attractions year-round. The region will inspire you with its breathtaking vistas, waterways, and extraordinary landscapes. America's oldest state park, Niagara Falls State Park, is open 365 days a year—allowing visitors to soak in its natural beauty in all four seasons and feel the unparalleled force of nature from several viewing areas.

    Ride the world-famous Maid of the Mist aboard their all-electric, emission free vessels, or get up close and personal to the thundering Bridal Veil Falls on Cave of the Winds. Get your heart pumping with miles of hiking trails and awe-inspiring views along the Niagara River Gorge.

    Immerse yourself in living history as you explore original 18th century buildings at Old Fort Niagara or cruise through the only set of double locks on the historic Erie Canal aboard Lockport Locks & Erie Canal Cruises. Discover the region’s stunning countryside and visit one of the many u-pick farms or award-winning wineries, breweries, and cideries.

    Plan your getaway today and explore all there is to see and do in Niagara Falls USA.

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    Niagara Falls Articles

    Adventure

    Six iconic experiences in Argentina

    When traveling through Argentina for the first time, it can be daunting to nail down what to see and what to do. To help travelers enjoy Argentina’s expansive array of experiences, see below for six iconic Argentine adventures that can’t be missed: 1. Cheer at a fútbol match in Buenos Aires Credit: Visit Argentina Boasting the most soccer stadiums in the world, a trip to Buenos Aires is not complete without cheering loudly from the fan stands at a local soccer match. Sports fanatics can head to the Boca Juniors Museum and Bombonera stadium, or Estadio Alberto J. Armando as it’s officially called, home to Diego Maradona’s Boca Juniors, or to Núñez to visit the River Plate Stadium home of Boca’s arch rivals, River Plate. 2. Hike to a glacier in Los Glaciares National Park: Credit: Visit Argentina Located in Patagonia and recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Los Glaciares National Park is a wonderland of glacial landscapes, including the stunning Perito Moreno, viewable via ferry boat or even via a guided hiking trek. 3. Horseback ride through a Mendoza winery: Mendoza, most known for its Malbec, produces 70 percent of all the wine that is made in Argentina. An hour from the city, travelers can enjoy Argentina’s mountain landscape while on a horseback tour at one of the huge varieties of wineries. A few regions include Luján de Cuyo, Maipú or the Uco Valley. 4. Whale watch at Valdés Peninsula: Credit: Visit Argentina As one of South America’s finest wildlife reserves, the Valdés Peninsula offers hundreds of miles of coastline that wildlife such as orca whales, sea lions, elephant seals, Magellanic penguins and more call home. Travelers should try to catch a glimpse of the unique orca whale beaching phenomenon that happens biannually from March through May in Punta Norte and from September through December in Caleta Valdés. 5. Witness the rushing water of Iguazú Falls: Credit: Visit Argentina Argentina’s infamous Iguazú Falls, reaching nearly twice the width and height of Niagara Falls, are often considered one of the natural wonders of the world for good reason. On the Argentina side of the falls, the perfect place to take in the wonder is at Devil’s Throat or "Garganta del Diabo," accessible via a walkway across Río Iguazú. 6. Trek to the Salinas Grandes (or Salt Flats): Credit: Visit Argentina Discover Argentina’s vastly contrasting landscapes at the awe-inspiring salt flats or Salinas Grandes, located in the far north west of Argentina. There are a few tours across Salta and the surrounding regions and while there, travelers shouldn’t miss taking the Train in the Clouds or “Tren a las Nubes.” This content was produced in partnership with Visit Argentina.

    Inspiration

    These are fall's most popular US camping destinations, according to Campspot

    For insight into where travelers are heading as the leaves change colors, the platform Campspot consulted the booking data for its roster of family campgrounds, RV resorts, glamping sites, and more to determine the most in-demand destinations for autumn camping, based on the number of reservations from just after Labor Day through October. In no particular order, here are the top 10 places Campspot campers are flocking this fall.  Editor's note: Please check the latest travel restrictions before planning any trip and always follow government advice. Near Cape May, Big Timber Lake is an RV resort with plenty of amenities © Tyler D. Way/CampspotCape May, New Jersey Less than 20 miles from the family-friendly beaches, old-school boardwalks and historic painted Victorians of Cape May is Big Timber Lake RV Camping Resort, a sprawling site with basketball, volleyball, bocce, and shuffleboard courts, kayak rentals, mini golf, an arcade, and a 2,000 square-foot pool.  Holiday seekers can get into the spirit of the season in Santa Claus, Indiana @ Sun RV ResortsSanta Claus, Indiana It’s never too early for Christmas in southwestern Indiana’s Santa Claus, and its Lake Rudolph Campground & RV Resort has Christmas cabins and holiday cottages, not to mention Santa's Splashdown Waterpark, which has two big tube slides and a reindeer-themed water playground.  Camping in Quarryville offers a front-row seat for the fall-foliage action © CampspotLancaster County, Pennsylvania Southeastern Pennsylvania’s fall foliage rarely disappoints, and Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park Camp-Resort: Quarryville offers a front row seat for the action. It’s situated on 65 wooded acres abutting a 100-acre county park, but it’s more resort than camp, with two swimming pools, two hot tubs, a water zone, and a giant inflatable jumping pillow, plus laser tag and escape rooms for an extra charge.  Myrtle Beach, South Carolina Myrtle Beach is a party town at the height of summer, and though it’s more low-key during the cooler months, there’s still plenty to do. Guests at Carolina Pines RV Resort may not want to leave the premises – there’s a bistro and a yoga studio on-site as well as a mini golf course and an arcade – but for those who prefer to get out and explore, the beaches and trails of Myrtle Beach State Park are just 20 minutes away.  The restorative scenery of Shenandoah National Park is less than two hours from the nation's capital © CampspotShenandoah National Park – Washington, DC An hour and a half west of DC, in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah National Park is an easy day trip from the nation’s capital, but it feels a world away. The Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park in nearby Luray, Virginia, provides the chain’s signature amenities, from mini golf and gem-mining to pools and water slides; accommodations include pet-friendly cottages, RV sites, and primitive tent camping.  Central Michigan The lakes of Michigan are a picture-perfect setting for a summer getaway, but they’re not too shabby in fall colors either. Central Michigan’s Cedar River plays host to Gladwin City Park and Campground, a back-to-basics set-up with rustic cabins and sites for tent and RV camping, while Beaverton’s Calhoun Campground has Ross Lake-facing rustic, electric, and full hookup sites.  Accommodations at Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park in Western New York include this two-bedroom A-frame chalet with cable and WiFi @ Sun RV ResortsBuffalo, New York In a few months, only the hardy will be taking camping trips in upstate New York, but for now, the region that boasts natural beauties like Niagara Falls and Lake George is a solid option for leaf-peeping. About an hour outside of Buffalo, Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park Camp-Resort: Western New York has chalets, cabins, wooded and open tent sites, and full-hookup RV sites, all pet-friendly with WiFi access. In Paso Robles, the Wine Country RV Resort has RV sites as well as chalets and cottages © Sun RV ResortsPaso Robles, California There’s nothing like winery-hopping on a brisk sunny day, and between the shopping, the golf, the wining, and the dining, San Luis Obispo County's Paso Robles region has more than a few options for oenophiles. Wine Country RV Resort is centrally located,  with pull-through and back-in RV sites as well as chalets and cottages.  Arches National Park – Moab, Utah The red sandstone of Arches National Park creates a stunning setting for one of nature’s biggest playgrounds, and nearby Moab serves as the gateway for outdoor adventures in the vicinity. Six miles south of the park gates (and less than 40 miles east of Canyonlands) is CanyonLands RV Resort & Campground, where the region’s signature red rocks overlook the swimming pool. Tent and RV sites are available, as are cabin rentals.  The Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park in Gardiner serves as a base of operations for exploring the Hudson Valley's Minnewaska State Park Preserve @ CampspotMinnewaska State Park Preserve – Kerhonkson, New York A 22,275-acre park in the Hudson Valley, Minnewaska draws outdoorsy types year-round for everything from rock climbing to snowshoeing. Six miles away, the sprawling Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park in Gardiner has rustic tent sites and premium cabins, as well as luxe lodges and full houses for rent. 

    Budget Travel Lists

    Budget Travel readers' 2020 bucket list

    ©Witold Skrypczak/Alamy Stock Photo Big Bend National Park in Texas provides some of the best stargazing sites in North America. ©John Woodworth/Getty Images Grand Tetons National Park in Wyoming is beautiful, and Yellowstone is a short drive away! ©f11photo/Shutterstock Las Vegas is a perennial favorite (albeit difficult to do on a budget). ©Yukinori Hasumi/Getty Images New York, New York, the city of lights. ©mtnmichelle/Getty Images Lots of Budget Travel readers are planning trips to Alaska in 2020! ©Valentin Prokopets/500px/Getty Images Who among us wouldn't want a trip to Hawaii? ©pics721/Shutterstock Cruises to the Bahamas can be found for cheap rates! ©f11photo/Shutterstock Charleston, South Carolina, is a great place for a long weekend. ©CPQ/Shutterstock Witness the thunderous natural power of Niagara Falls. ©Micha Weber/Shutterstock New Orleans, Louisiana (or NOLA), known for throwing a great party. ©Martin Wheeler/EyeEm/Getty Images San Juan in Puerto Rico is an explosion of color! ©cdrin/Shutterstock Seattle, Washington, has great weather and mountain views! ©Matt Munro/Lonely Planet Sedona, Arizona, might be a center of mysterious spiritual vortexes. ©lightphoto/Getty Images The Catskills in New York are a great road trip!

    Inspiration

    Where to Travel for the Best Canadian Wine

    Despite its chilly reputation, Canadian wine has been winning awards and making a name for itself for years. That includes chardonnay from Prince Edward County, appellation wine in Nova Scotia and everything from full-bodied reds to crisp whites in the Okanagan Valley. Although the wine is often super affordable (think $15-$20 CAD a bottle with little to no tasting fees – that’s about $11.50 to $15 USD!) it still tends to be exclusive, since many wineries only sell their wine from the tasting room. So traveling to the wine is often your best bet, and luckily, Canada has a lot to offer. These are the best Canadian wine regions worth busting out your passport for. Okanagan Valley, British Columbia The Okanagan Valley is Canada’s only desert, with dry, hot (really!) summers and cool evenings. With more than 185 wineries, the Okanagan Valley is British Columbia’s largest wine region by far, and the second most productive in Canada. Four different sub-regions exist in this stretch of land and the soil is ripe for many different wine varietals, including merlot, pinot gris, syrahs and rieslings. The area attracts a diversity of winemakers, too. The first indigenous-owned and operated winery in North America, Nk’Mip Cellars, is at the southern end of the Okanagan in the town of Osoyoos. Their chardonnay won gold at the Chardonnay du Monde in 2018. Just 20 minutes north in Oliver, two brothers who immigrated from Punjab, India, now run the small but successful Kismet Estate Winery, which won more than a dozen awards in 2018 for everything from their syrah and malbec reserve to their rosė – all while selling the majority of their grapes to other winemakers in the area. And the area’s features are strong enough that vintner Severine Pinte left France to be the winemaker and viticulturist LaStella Winery since 2010. Prince Edward County, Ontario Two hours east of Toronto, Prince Edward County is a popular escape for Canadians and New Yorkers alike thanks to their nearly 500 miles of sandy shoreline. When it comes to wine, they’re still the new kids in town, though they have 40+ wineries and have spent the last two decades building their reputation as top-notch winemakers. The region is known for their pinot noir and chardonnay, whose vines they painstakingly bury underground at the end of each harvest to keep safe from the icy winters. Both Rosehall Run’s 2017 JCR Pinot Noir Rosehall and their 2016 Cabernet Franc Single won gold at the National Wine Awards of Canada, and the area has had a string of awards against international competitors as well. Bunches of wine grapes waiting for frost for ice wine harvest in Ontario © Horst Petzold | Dreamstime.com Niagara, Ontario Niagara is one of the better-known wine regions in Canada, most famous for their ice wines – a syrupy-sweet drink made from grapes left on the vine into winter, where temperatures have to reach -8 degrees celsius before they’re harvested. The seasonally frigid temperatures around the Great Lakes are especially well-situated to make this kind of wine, which is why Niagara has grown its vintner reputation on it. If you’re hoping for more than a dessert drink when touring wine country, two of Niagara’s rieslings took home gold at 2019’s Decanter World Wine Awards, and the baco noir from Sue-Ann Staff Estate Winery won bronze at the 2019 Berlin International Wine Competition. To get around, you can drive, ride on a double-decker bus, or try one of the increasingly popular cycling tours. The Eastern Townships, Quebec The Eastern Townships, a collection of small cities and towns that sits two hours east of Montreal, is already a popular all-seasons getaway for New Englanders. Golf, water sports, skiing, cycling, four provincial parks and a high concentration of spas make it an easy choice when folks nearby need an escape. The elegant architecture and largely Francophone population make it feel much farther from the US than it actually is. The area is also responsible for the majority of Quebec’s local wine. One of the best ways to get a taste for the region is via their Wine Route, which follows more than 20 vineyards in the Brome-Missisquoi region. You won’t have to worry about finding your way around, as the entire 140 km (that’s about 87 miles) route is marked. Standout vineyards include Vignoble de l’Orpailleur, which has won numerous international awards for their ice wine, and Vignoble Domaine des Côtes d’Ardoise, Quebec’s first vineyard, which has mastered everything from reds to rosés and ciders over the years. Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia This area is perhaps better known for the Bay of Fundy, which has the highest tides on earth – sometimes as high as 56 feet – and regularly has 15 different species of whales swim by. It’s so special that it’s been named one of the seven wonders of North America, alongside other spots like the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls. But Annapolis Valley, which runs alongside the Bay of Fundy, has its own bragging rights, too. Home to the bulk of Nova Scotia’s wineries (11 of 18) you’d be remiss not to try Nova Scotia’s Tidal Bay appellation wine while visiting. This crisp white showcases the cool climate and oceanic influence, and uses a blend of white wines that must be grown in the Nova Scotia region. This year, Annapolis Valley vineyard Lightfoot and Wolfville won the award for Best Winery at the 2019 Atlantic Canadian Wine Awards as well as took home several different awards for their vintages, including a tied win for the Tidal Bay of the year.

    Adventure

    The 10 Coolest Helicopter Tours in the World

    We set out to find the most breathtaking helicopter excursions, from beautiful coral reefs and active volcanoes to stunning waterfalls and iconic city skylines. Here are our top ten helicopter tours. 1. The Grand Canyon, AZ Measuring 277 miles from east to west, the Grand Canyon is an immense chasm carved by the Colorado River. Featuring a unique ecosystem, the canyon is decorated with red rocks that reveal its ancient geological history – in fact, some studies suggest the canyon could be as old as 70 million years. Consider choosing a tour that flies over the Grand Canyon’s stunning South Rim, letting you soar over the widest and deepest part of the canyon. 2. Juneau, Alaska A helicopter tour is one of the best ways to take in Juneau Icefield, an endless horizon of ice-capped mountain ranges and flowing rivers of ice. Located just north of Alaska’s capital, the icefield is home to nearly 40 large glaciers. It stretches more than 1500 square miles, and is dotted with deep crevasses and azure blue ice. 3. Great Barrier Reef, Australia Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, one of the most sought-after tourist destinations around the globe, is one of the seven wonders of the natural world. Its sprawling reef system, which is spread over 1400 miles, boasts bright sand cays and more than 400 types of coral resting in crystal clear waters – all visible from up above in a scenic helicopter flight. 4. Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii See the fiery lava vents of one of the most active volcanoes in the world – from a safe distance aboard a helicopter. The volcano erupted in 2018, causing vigorous lava fountains to flow out that permanently changed the area’s landscape. For a fully immersive experience, take a doors-off helicopter tour of the volcano. 5. Niagara Falls, Ontario You’ll still able to hear the thundering roar of Niagara Falls when you’re looking down at the most powerful waterfall in North America. The falls straddle the international border between Canada and the US, but the Canadian side offers a favorable exchange rate that allows you to take a less-expensive helicopter tour of the three waterfalls that collectively form Niagara Falls. 6. Victoria Falls, Africa Care to travel a little farther to see the largest waterfall in the world? A helicopter tour of Victoria Falls in southern Africa on the Zambezi River offers beautiful views of one of Mother Nature’s most spectacular sights. Victoria Falls is the greatest curtain of falling water on the globe. It sprays more than five hundred million cubic meters of water per minute over an edge that plummets into a gorge more than hundred meters below, causing the sound of the falls to be heard from a distance of up 40 kilometers. 7. New York City, NY Flying in a helicopter over the island of Manhattan provides sweeping view of the Big Apple. You’ll get an up-close view of New York’s most iconic landmarks, from the Empire State Building and Times Square to Central Park and the Statue of Liberty, without having to deal with the throngs of tourists that roam the city on any given day. You’ll also enjoy a panoramic view of NYC’s iconic skyline. By the time you’re back on the ground, the city’s skyscrapers may not seem so tall anymore. 8. Nepal Explore the Himalayas by helicopter on a tour across Nepal’s high-altitude ranges. Soar over Everest Base Camp, the Khumbu Glacier, and Sagarmatha National Park Nepal, a UNESCO World Heritage site that contains areas of the Dudh Kosi river, Bhotekoshi river basin, and the Gokyo Lakes. Flying beats making the typical 12-day round trip trek by foot to Everest Base Camp. 9. Guatemala Only slightly larger than the state of Tennessee, Guatemala is home to volcanic trenches, rainforests, astounding Mayan ruins – including pyramids, temples, palaces, and fortresses – and the beautiful Lake Amatitlán, a popular tourist destination. This diverse landscape makes for a stunning helicopter ride. 10. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil From high above you’ll take in Rio de Janeiro’s white sand beaches, like Ipanema and Copacabana, the spectacular granite peak of Sugar Loaf Mountain, and, of course, the statue of Christ the Redeemer, the largest Art Deco-style sculpture in the world and a cultural icon of Brazil.

    Inspiration

    The USA’s Best Fall Wine Harvest Festivals

    Come September and October, vineyards begin to harvest the grapes that they’ve ever so carefully grown and cared for all season. Vineyards around the world celebrate their bounty with end-of-harvest festivities. Marking the occasion with music and dancing in the vines to food, grape stomping contests and plenty of vino. Willamette Valley Vineyards – Turner, Oregon Every year Willamette Valley Vineyards, celebrates the end of harvest with a Grape Stomp Championship and Harvest Celebration. So kick off your shoes and get ready to stomp! This year marks the 29th year, and it will take place on September 21st and 22nd in Oregon wine country. The winners of the competition receive an all-expense paid trip to the World Championship Grape Stomp in Santa Rosa. In addition to stomping, guests can enjoy Willamette Valley Vineyards’ latest wine releases (a tasting flight is included with the $15 admission). Guests are also welcome to try the custom harvest-inspired menu created by Winery Chef, DJ MacIntyre, along with live music and lawn games. Calaveras Winegrape Alliance – Murphys, California You’ll feel like you’re going back in time in Murphys, California, a historic Gold Country town nestled in the Sierra foothills. But don’t let that fool you; they sure know how to celebrate the end of harvest. Every first Saturday in October, the town of Murphys transforms into a frenzy of activity with two popular events. Organized by the Calaveras Wine Alliance, the Annual Calaveras Grape Stomp includes energetic stomp competitions every half hour. You can also look forward to live and silent auctions, a team costumes contest and wine tastings of course. Just half a block away, there’s something for everyone at the Annual Gold Rush Street Faire. Main Street fills with over 100 booths of local food, handmade jewelry, unique fashion, art and crafts and more. Château Elan Winery & Resort – Braselton, Georgia The good thing about this winery is that it has a resort just in case you taste too much delicious wine. Château Elan celebrates the end of harvest season with a massive Vineyard Fest on November 17th in the north Georgia foothills. With 1500 guests annually, the festival is sure to be even bigger this year after a $25 million renovation that will be unveiled. This year’s theme is “Flavors of the South” with a spotlight on the local restaurants. Guests can look forward to tasting over 100 beers and wines and a myriad of food stations with everything from pralines to fried green tomatoes. Don’t worry – there will be plenty of grape-stomping to burn off those calories. Niagara Falls Wine Region – Niagara Falls, New York This is a celebration to remember! More than 20 vineyards throughout Niagara Falls USA’s wine region come together for the annual Harvest Festival on September 21st and 22nd. As part of the festival, each vineyard pairs its wine with a harvest-themed appetizer, salad, soup, side dish or dessert. So come hungry! Tickets are $22 and include a tasting of three wines with a food sample at each participating winery. Some dishes to look out for include a lavender and sage ratatouille paired with Liten Buffel’s 2017 Perfetto Vineyard Pinot Noir. Or Long Cliff Winery & Vineyards savory pumpkin macaroni and cheese paired with their 2013 Reserve Pinot Noir. The Winery at Holy Cross Abbey – Cañon City, Colorado Head to The Winery at Holy Cross Abbey for a free harvest event in the Pikes Peak region of Colorado. The Harvest Festival is an annual event where partygoers can indulge in local foods and enjoy blues and jazz bands. Want to make your own wine? Anyone attending ehe Harvest Festival is able to bring their own grapes to be added to that year’s unique “Canon Harvest” wine batch. This all goes down on September 28th and 29th, and the community batch will eventually be bottled and sold. Guests can also splurge on a special dining experience with the Winemakers Dinner Friday night for a cost of $125 per ticket. The chef will highlight Colorado produce, meats, fish, and cheeses in the creation of the menus. Think miso trout and brown butter sage gnocchi, all paired with divine wine. Morgan Creek Vineyards – New Ulm, Minnesota Thanks to its strong German heritage, New Ulm, Minnesota, does Oktoberfest like no other the first two weekends every October. Part of New Ulm’s Oktoberfest celebration, Morgan Creek Vineyards’ annual Grape Stomp kicks off the first Saturday in October. Visitors can enjoy German music and dance performances, food and wine pairings, tours and more. Now, back to the main event. October 5th is the grape stomp competition day, where teams of three to five stompers compete to produce the largest volume of juice stomped from fresh grapes. The prize: bragging rights and a free case of wine. A costume contest is also held in conjunction with the grape stomp. Good luck!

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    DESTINATION IN New York

    Buffalo

    Buffalo is the second-largest city in the U.S. state of New York and the seat of Erie County. It is located in the eastern end of Lake Erie, adjacent to the Canadian border with Southern Ontario, and is at the head of the Niagara River. With a population of 278,348 according to the 2020 census, Buffalo is the 76th-largest city in the United States. The city and nearby Niagara Falls share the two-county Buffalo–Niagara Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The MSA had an estimated population of 1.1 million in 2020, making it the 49th largest MSA in the United States. The Western New York region containing Buffalo is the largest population and economic center between Boston, Massachusetts and Cleveland, Ohio. Before French exploration, the region was inhabited by nomadic Paleo-Indians, and later, the Neutral, Erie, and Iroquois nations. In the 18th century, Iroquois land surrounding Buffalo Creek was ceded through the Holland Land Purchase, and a small village was established at its headwaters. Buffalo was selected as the terminus of the Erie Canal in 1825 after improving its harbor, which led to its incorporation in 1832. The canal stimulated its growth as the primary inland port between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean. Transshipment made Buffalo the world's largest grain port. After railroads superseded the canal's importance, the city became the largest railway hub after Chicago. Buffalo transitioned to manufacturing during the mid-19th century, later dominated by steel production. Deindustrialization and the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway saw the city's economy decline, diversifying to service industries such as health care, retail, tourism, logistics, and education while retaining some manufacturing. The gross domestic product of the Buffalo–Niagara Falls MSA was $53 billion in 2019. The city's cultural icons include the oldest urban parks system in the United States, the Albright–Knox Art Gallery, the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Shea's Performing Arts Center, the Buffalo Museum of Science, and several annual festivals. Its educational institutions include the University at Buffalo, Buffalo State College, Canisius College, D'Youville College and Medaille College. Buffalo is also known for its winter weather, Buffalo wings, and two major-league sports teams: the National Football League's Buffalo Bills and the National Hockey League's Buffalo Sabres.