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    Warren,

    Ohio

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    Warren is a city in and the county seat of Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. The municipality is located in northeastern Ohio, approximately 14 miles (23 km) northwest of Youngstown and 56 miles (90 km) southeast of Cleveland. The population was 41,558 at the 2010 census. Warren is the second largest city in the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, and anchors the northern part of that area.
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    Warren Articles

    Inspiration

    5 perfect rentals for plant lovers

    The home gardening trend that bloomed during the pandemic has planted roots for the long term, with nurseries continuing to report record sales as consumers test and refine their green thumbs. Plant-loving travelers looking to take their plant parentings skills to the next level will be rewarded with stays at these five botanical vacation rentals courtesy of Vacasa, the leading full-service vacation rental management company in North America. As an added bonus, there are parks, greenhouses, gardens and more nearby, offering plenty of additional opportunities to enjoy nature’s beauty in full bloom. Source: Vacasa Arcadian Gardens (Sequim, Washington) - It’s fitting that this vacation home is in The Evergreen State, where an indoor koi pond—and hot tub—are surrounded by an impressive display of tropical plants that create a jungle-like oasis. Spend an afternoon at Pioneer Memorial Park, a beautiful 4-acre park and arboretum located right downtown and maintained by the Sequim Prairie Garden Club. Home Run House (Warren, Vermont) - This custom-built vacation home uses greenery to soften the steely gray of its industrial-style interior architecture, with a two-story living wall of plants and a forest of potted trees. Nearby, the Von Trapp Greenhouse in Waitsfield has been growing all of its own plants from seeds, cuttings, or divisions for more than 40 years. Source: Vacasa Mellow Marsh (Folly Beach, South Carolina) - Wicker baskets and plant stands dot the living area of this beachside rental, proving that even with a view of palm trees from the deck, a fiddle leaf fig tree can really bring a space to life. Head about 20 minutes inland to Charleston and stroll through acres upon acres of romantic blooms at the popular Middleton Place or Magnolia Garden. Source: Vacasa Yellowtail Home in the Meadow (Big Sky, Montana) - This Big Sky sun porch, complete with skylights, is decked out with a container garden of trees that artfully brings the outdoors in, but will keep any chilly evening temps at bay. An abundance of wildflowers line area hiking trails nearby, including Beehive Basin and Cinnamon Mountain, but remember to leave the colorful buds rooted—picking them is against hiker (and plant enthusiast) etiquette. Tabor Treehouse (Portland, Oregon) - As a house in a plant, this vacation rental gives guests the true “one with nature” experience. If that’s not enough, nearby Leach Botanical Garden (which unveiled a $12 million renovation this spring) is home to a diverse collection of more than 2,000 plants across its 16.5 acres Source: Vacasa This content has been provided in partnership with Vacasa.

    Budget Travel Lists

    The Budget Travel Guide to Vermont

    During a drive in Vermont, it’s common to see simple, handwritten signs tempting with their advertisements of hyper-local goods. “Eggs for Sale,” “Maple Syrup Here” and “Fresh Produce” beckon drivers all along the state’s country roads. Unless you’re in a big hurry — and, if you’re driving through Vermont, where the pace is almost island-like, you shouldn’t be — you’ll want to factor in random, unplanned stops, a promising part of a visit to the quintessential New England state. All-season playground Nestled in between Massachusetts, New York and New Hampshire, Vermont is the second-least-populated U.S. state. It’s no stranger to visitors, however, who long ago began discovering the sweet state’s trove of treasures. It starts with its rolling green mountains, duly cherished by skiers and snowboarders. Fans of the winter sport flock to Stowe for its European-like village and Mount Mansfield, Vermont’s highest mountain, and to Jay Peak, the beloved resort on the US-Canada border. Killington’s sheer vastness (1,509 skiable acres) explains its well-appointed nickname: The Beast. There’s a mountain for every level — and every interest too. While skiing has never been a budget-friendly sport, those who wish to get in a day on the slopes will find flexibility is key for the gentlest prices. A midweek day pass offers the best value for your buck; at $146/day, upscale Stratton is on the high end, and at $93/day, Mount Snow is on the lower end. But the best deal is for those athletes who don’t need a chairlift to get up the mountain. One can experience The Beast for $35 — and plenty of grit and endurance to skin up the mountain. Of course, Vermont’s mountains don’t disappear come summer, and for many, it’s a much more pleasant time to check out the trails. Plus, it’s free in the off-season! Cyclists, trekkers, and ambitious trail runners will be rewarded with mesmerizing views at the top. If the state’s heavily forested landscape is something to see along the road, it’s otherworldly from this vantage point. For those preferring water activities, Vermont’s warm-weather months offer a bevy of recreational activities. Lake Champlain comes alive in summer. Think paddleboarding, kayaking, fishing, swimming and sunning. A visit to Lake Champlain is highly recommended, but it’s not the only way to splash around. All across the state are swimming holes, waterfalls and treks of varying degrees of difficulty, many with water crossings. Some top spots include Clarendon Gorge, Warren Falls, and Bristol Falls, though it’s worth noting it is possible to find random waterfalls and swimming holes no matter where your adventures take you. Beer is good After you’ve worked up a sweat and cooled off in a river, it’s time for liquid sustenance. Vermont’s beer scene exploded years ago, but it’s still popping today, as evidenced by the astounding number of breweries across the state. That and the fact that you’re more likely to find a four-pack of craft brews than a six-pack of Budweiser at the local markets and gas stations has aided Vermont’s stellar reputation among beer drinkers. It’s never a bad idea to visit a brewery, and it’s an especially good idea when there’s a killer view to pair with your pint. Beer Naked in Marlboro, VT sits on the top of Hogback Mountain; the deck tables are worth waiting for. The rotating selection of craft brews pairs wonderfully with inventive and familiar bites coming out of the kitchen — bone marrow spread to please the adventurous eaters, and the cheese plate as a matter of course. If you want to get a taste of several different breweries and a deeper understanding of why Vermont’s beer scene is superior, you might consider a Vermont Brewery Tour with 4 Points. For less than a hundred bucks, the tour includes pick-up and drop-off, multiple brewery stops and tastings, snacks and entertaining fodder from your guide. It’s a relative bargain, though not as inexpensive as creating your own beer trail with the help of this nifty website. Cheese, please You can find excellent local cheese in just about every Vermont grocery or general store. River Bend Market in Wilmington has a particularly unique selection of cheese from reputable cheese makers, including Vermont Creamery, Crawley, and Grafton, which has its own shop in Brattleboro.. A visit to Grafton Village Cheese, which sells wine and cheese accoutrements, may just inspire an impromptu picnic. If you’d rather gallivant around the state collecting this most delicious of souvenirs, you’ll be delighted to learn there’s a Cheese Trail Map, which lists the cheese makers who welcome visitors. In July, $50 will get you into the Vermont Cheesemaker’s Festival, which offers workshops, tasting and other cheese-centric activities around the over 200 cheeses showcased. Non-dairy provisions While the state deserves its cheesy (sorry/not sorry!) reputation, when it comes to wallet-friendly bites, you need not look too hard to find other delicious items. Charming diners, cafes and bistros can be found throughout the state, but look a little closer and you’ll start to notice a smattering of food trucks. Vermont’s food truck scene isn’t as diverse as Portland Oregon’s or as big as Austin, Texas’s, but it’s nonetheless an exciting one. Nomad Food Kitchen Trailer in Dover has weekly specials in addition to a menu rounded out by ramen. About that ramen: The prices are a little steep for this part of town, but the best thing on the menu is the $5 pork bun. Loaded with glistening meat, crispy around the edges, crunchy vegetables and sweet and salty sauce, it’s basically two (three if you’re a more delicate eater) of the best bites in Vermont. Healthier fare can be found at Carte Blanche in Burlington. Think eclectic soups, inventive sandwiches (pork belly with miso mayo), and kimchi-topped rice bowls. As the name implies, anything goes here. Further North in Jefferson is chef and owner Lea Ann Macrery’s My Favorite Things. Hailing from South Africa and Malawai, Macrery might be dishing up poutine one day and a specialty beef burrito the next. Most of the food trucks update their Instagram and Facebook pages regularly, so check there first to make sure you know how and where to find them. Dose of Culture Vermont boasts a number of family-friendly activities, many of which are inexpensive or free. A top pick is Bread & Puppet Theater, where puppets perform in a barn in the middle of the Northeast Kingdom. Art can be purchased here too — and for a nominal fee. Want to add a history lesson to your Vermont visit? The Vermont Historical Society offers an interesting look at the state’s history, including a collection depicting the early days of skiing. The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum also offers a history lesson with its model gallery showing the evolution of boat building in the region and The Roost, a cabin featuring stories of women on the water -- lighthouse keepers and lake explorers. Both children and adults will find joy in Vermont’s farms, whether picking blueberries in July or petting alpacas in the fall. Midnight Goat Farm sells cheese and offers goat meetings in typical times. Maple View Farm sells alpacas and offers information on alpaca breeding, but you need not be in the market for an alpaca — visiting and petting opportunities are available at this farm. Shelburne Farms is chock-full of animals and kid-friendly activities. Introduce the kids to donkeys, cows and sheep and pick up some pasture-farmed eggs if you haven’t already been lured off the road by an “eggs for sale” sign. For many visitors to Vermont, a must is visiting the flagship Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream factory. Located in Waterbury, this is also where you’ll find the infamous Flavor Graveyard, just up the hill from the main building. Here you can grieve the flavors that are no longer. Dog lovers traveling with Fido or missing Fido back at home won’t want to miss Dog Mountain, where dog-lover and artist Stephen Huneck, has created a haven for dog people. Roaming the grounds and visiting the chapel is free. Gone antiquing Just up the road from the sprawling Grafton Village Cheese complex is Jeff’s Basement, an antique store with an impressive as well price-friendly selection of mid-century and postmodern furniture, lamps, and art. For more fantastic vintage finds, Anjou & The Little Pear up in Burlington delights with cool glassware, snazzy art and old but gently used rugs. For more eclectic finds and random finds, The Vermont Antique Mall has everything from the old-school bedside clock you didn’t know you needed to the mini cast iron pan. And, finally, for rock-bottom prices and seriously sweet finds, including rooms full of toys and children’s games, there’s Twice Blessed. Located in Dover, right next to the dog-friendly Snow Republic Brewery, the cash-only shop a fine place to while away an hour or two and make good use of that twenty-dollar bill hiding in your wallet.

    Inspiration

    Celebrate 100 years of women's suffrage with these monuments

    August 18, 2020 marks a century since the ratification of the 19th constitutional amendment granting the right to vote regardless of gender. Since far before and after 1920, women of all backgrounds across the U.S. have been championing civil rights and other issues of the day. While landmarks, monuments and memorials to suffragettes and female civil rights advocates might have limited hours or be inaccessible due to COVID-19 mandates, you could walk or drive past some of them. Here is where to begin: Alabama Montgomery’s Dexter Avenue is along the route of the bus that Rosa Parks would board and refuse to give up her seat to a white man in 1955; a life-size statue of Parks stands there. Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum and Library on Montgomery Street is dedicated to Parks’ action and the subsequent Montgomery Bus Boycott. California In San Diego’s Arts District Liberty Station, the Women’s Museum of California preserves her-story by teaching about various women’s experiences and contributions. Colorado In Denver’s Capitol Hill, the Molly Brown House Museum showcases the famous Titanic survivor who helped to organize the Conference of Great Women in 1914 in Newport, while the Center for Colorado Women’s History tells about this topic through exhibits and lectures. In Colorado Springs, a statue of entertainer and philanthropist Fannie Mae Duncan, who owned and integrated the city’s first jazz club, stands outside the Pikes Peak Center. Connecticut In Canterbury, the Prudence Crandall Museum honors Connecticut’s Official State Heroine who ran a higher education academy for African American women until mob violence forced her school to close. In Hartford, the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center is where the “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” author and activist once lived. It now serves as a museum and a forum for social justice and change. Delaware The Old State House in Dover’s First State Heritage Park was where suffragists Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Mary Ann Sorden Stuart addressed Delaware legislators in support of a state constitutional amendment in favor of women’s suffrage. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway crosses into Kent and New Castle counties in Delaware but comes from Maryland’s Eastern Shore and concludes in Philadelphia. It encompasses 45 sites linked to Tubman, who also supported women’s suffrage, plus others who sought freedom from enslavement. District of Columbia In Capitol Hill, the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument was the headquarters for the National Women’s Party; it’s named for Alice Paul, the party’s founder, and Alva Belmont, a major benefactor. In Lincoln Park, the Mary McLeod Bethune Statue is the first to honor an African American woman in a D.C. public park; her home, now the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House, was the first location for the National Council of Negro Women. In Northwest D.C., the Mary Church Terrell House is for the founder and president of the National Association of Colored Women who successfully fought to integrate dining spots in D.C. Florida The Eleanor Collier McWilliams Monument on Tampa’s Riverwalk Historical Monument Trail highlights women's rights pioneer who has been credited with starting the women's suffrage movement in Florida. Illinois Now a private residence, in Chicago’s Douglas neighborhood, the Ida B. Wells-Barnett House was where civil rights advocate and journalist Ida B. Wells, and her husband, Ferdinand Lee Barnett, resided for almost 20 years. Wells led an anti-lynching crusade across the U.S. and fought for woman’s suffrage. Kentucky The SEEK Museum in Russellville has put on display a life-size bronze statue of civil rights pioneer Alice Allison Dunnigan – the first female African American admitted to the White House, Congressional and Supreme Court press corps – at a park adjacent to its Payne-Dunnigan house on East 6th Street. In Lexington, at Ashland, the estate of Henry Clay, a marker honors Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, Clay’s great-granddaughter, social reformer and suffragist. Maryland Along the Harriet Tubman Byway, the Bucktown Village Store in Cambridge is where a young Tubman would defy an overseer’s order and was impacted by a resulting head injury. At Historic St. Mary’s City in Southern Maryland, learn about Margaret Brent, an 17th century woman asking the colony’s leaders for voting rights. In Baltimore, the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum was home to this predominant Civil Rights leader and president of the city’s NAACP branch. Massachusetts The Boston Women’s Heritage Trail encompass various neighborhoods and the women who lived in or are connected to them; their Women’s Suffrage Trail goes by stops such as the Boston Women’s Memorial. In Adams, the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum highlights what would influence this suffragist’s early life. Michigan In Battle Creek, where she lived out her final years, the Sojourner Truth Monument in Monument Park honors this abolitionist, suffragist and orator. Minnesota The Minnesota Woman Suffrage Memorial Garden at the Capitol Mall in St. Paul has a 94-foot steel trellis with the names of 25 key Minnesota suffragists. A series of steel tablets shares the story of the fight for women’s suffrage in this state. New Jersey The New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail includes sites such as the Paulsdale, the childhood home of suffragette Alice Stokes Paul that’s now part of the Alice Paul Institute. New Mexico Now the staff offices for the Georgia O’Keefe Museum in Santa Fe, the Alfred M. Bergere House was where Adelina (Nina) Otero Warren, a noted suffragist, author and business woman lived. She headed the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (a precursor to the National Woman’s Party). New York In Seneca Falls, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park contains the Wesleyan Chapel, where the First Women’s Rights Convention met, and the home of suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Harriet Tubman lived out the rest of her life in Auburn at Harriet Tubman National Historical Park. In Rochester, see the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House and take a selfie with “Let’s Have Tea,” the statue of Anthony with her friend Frederick Douglass in Anthony Square. The Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site in Hyde Park is the only one of its kind to a U.S. First Lady. Shirley Chisholm State Park in Brooklyn is named for first African American Congresswoman and the first woman and African American to run for president. Ohio An “Ohio Women in History” road itinerary lists eight stops including Oberlin College, which first granted undergrad degrees to women in a co-ed setting, and the Upton House and Women's Suffrage Museum in Warren, which recognizes Ohio suffragists. In Akron, a historical marker for Sojourner's Truth "Ain't I A Woman" speech commemorates where the church she spoke at once stood. Tennessee In Nashville, the Hermitage Hotel was used as a headquarters by suffragists to secure Tennessee’s ratification. Centennial Park is where the Tennessee Woman Suffrage Monument depicts five suffragists -- Carrie Chapman Catt, Sue Shelton White, J. Frankie Pierce, Anne Dallas Dudley and Abby Crawford Milton. Knoxville’s Tennessee Woman Suffrage Memorial depicts suffragists Lizzie Crozier French of Knoxville, Anne Dallas Dudley of Nashville, and Elizabeth Avery Meriwether of Memphis. Texas In downtown Dallas, Fair Park has a women’s history lesson where the 1893 State Fair featured a woman’s congress of over 300 women. During its 1913-1917 years, the fair’s Suffrage Day had local suffragists coming to promote women’s voting rights. Houston’s Barbara Jordan Park is named for this Civil Rights activist who was both the first African elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction and the first Southern African-American woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The Christia Adair Park features a mural depicting Adair’s devotion to gaining equal rights for blacks and women. Virginia In downtown Richmond, at Broad and Adams streets, a statue of Maggie L. Walker honors this civil rights activist and entrepreneur. Nearby, Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site represents more about accomplishments, including being the first woman to serve as president of a bank in the U.S. At the Virginia State Capital, the Virginia Women’s Monument features Walker and artist and suffragist Adele Clark among its 12 statues of women from across the Commonwealth. In Richmond’s Capitol Square, Virginia Civil Rights Memorial honors Barbara Johns, a Civil Rights activist led the first non-violent student demonstration in 1951. Wyoming In Laramie, the Wyoming House For Historic Women has an outdoor sculpture of Louisa Swain, who was the first woman to cast a ballot; it’s a block away from where she did that. Then, the Wyoming Women’s Suffrage Pathway includes part of South Pass City; it’s home to Esther Morris, the first woman to serve in the office as Justice of the Peace.

    Inspiration

    Seven Top Mural Hotels in the U.S.

    Have you ever stayed in two different hotels on separate coasts and seen the same art prints in each? You’re not alone. Hotels have long rubber-stamped their art collections, though that’s changing. The Alexander hotel in Indianapolis, for one, has an accredited art museum curating its collection. Hotels are also coloring outside the frame and decorating with street-art-turned-interior-décor. Some hotels commission internationally known artists to create one-of-a-kind murals, while others hire locally to give the interior a distinctive sense of place. Either way, the muralists transform the hotels into pieces of art in their own rights. Here are seven hotels with the best – and yes, most Instagram-able – murals in the country. Mural by Asend at Hotel Chicago West Loop, courtesy of the hotel Hotel Chicago West Loop Chicago, Illinois Six rooms in Hotel Chicago West Loop’s art-centric annex immerse guests in Windy City culture. Chicago-based artists including Josh Grotto, Brandin Hurley, Elloo, and Ascend have lent their talents to mural rooms, which showcase Chicago architecture, music, and history. Ascend’s work is exhibited locally and internationally, including in top-notch art fairs like Art Basel; his paintings combine a classical approach to portraiture with contemporary backgrounds. When not in use, the street-art rooms are open for viewing, giving the public a chance to see the works outside hallowed museum halls or traditional galleries. The artistry is growing: In late 2019, street artists will install another six eye-popping guestroom murals. Art students will join the artists for mentorship during the installation of the new murals. Hotel Chicago West Loop plans eventually to install paintings in the majority of its 116 rooms. From $119 Nativo Lodge Albuquerque, New Mexico Heritage Hotels & Resorts called upon a stable of contemporary Native American artists to paint 47 guest rooms (and counting) with murals. The rooms feel like living inside an artwork; they touch every wall and even flow into the bathroom and vanity spaces. Their artwork is rooted in cultural traditions and symbolism, but it’s expressed in vibrant and surprising ways. For example, in Love Movement, Jaque Fragua researched pre-Columbian Mesoamerican pottery designs in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. and expressed these designs in a hot-pink background splashed with gold paint. In Sustenance, Warren Montoya expresses traditional hunting practices of the Pueblo (Native American) people in the Rio Grande Valley. From $118. Hotel Des Arts San Francisco, California Hotel Des Arts certainly lives up to its artistic name: More than fifty guest rooms show installations or edgy, graffiti-art inspired murals. Internationally known street artists including Shepard Fairey, David Choe, Buff Monster, Jeremy Fish and Casey O’Connell have painted the one-of-a-kind room. David Cloe, a Los Angeles artist who painted room 304, has collaborated with everyone from Facebook to Jay-Z. Shepard Fairy, the South Carolina artist behind room 210, is perhaps most well-known for illustrating former President Barack Obama’s “Hope” campaign poster. From $159 Hotel McCoy Tucson, Arizona In its first life, Hotel McCoy was a 1969 motor lodge, but in the fall of 2018 new owners transformed it into an art hotel. Hotel McCoy has worked with 48 (and growing) Tucson artists on the outdoor murals, and via the lobby art gallery and in-room art. The murals capture Tucson’s creative side. They serve another purpose, too: “The inspiration behind my idea to incorporate art comes from my love of travel and addressing the feeling of homesickness that comes from it,” says Nicole Dahl, general manager and creative director. “When we travel, often our hotel leaves us feeling empty, disconnected if you will. We wanted to fix that and offer people a place where they could stay and feel a connection.” From $109 Hotel Vintage Portland Portland, Oregon Graffiti artist Andrew Horner freestyled three of Hotel Vintage Portland’s original murals in 2015. Just him, spray paint, and inspiration emanating from Portland’s sub-cultures. He incorporated Portland landmarks and symbols, like roses after the City of Roses’ nickname, in paintings located in a game lounge, downstairs hallways, and the main entrance stairwell. In 2016, this trio doubled when Viva La Free, a Portland non-profit that teaches at-risk youth to use art for healing, painted three additional murals on the fences of the Urban Soak Suites. The hotel is an urban outpost in Oregon’s wine country, the Willamette Valley, and the murals have a (perhaps surprising) similarity to wine: Just as a wine’s flavor blossoms with each sip, the murals reveal hidden elements over time. From $218 W Hotel Bellevue Bellevue, Washington The artists behind W Hotel Bellevue’s six murals may hail from outside the Pacific Northwest, but they certainly capture its vibe. Baltimore-based street artist Gaia gives a lesson in the past, present, and future of Bellevue in Settler Futurity. The towering, three-story mural on the main stairwell showcases the city’s agricultural roots with depictions of strawberry fields, and points to its present and future with aviation references. Other murals include three by Japanese-born and Brooklyn-based Lady Aiko, and two murals by San Francisco artist Zio Ziegler. The W brand hotels emphasize design and the Bellevue edition lives up to that mission. From $289. Mural by Chaz Bear at Ace Hotel and Swim Club, courtesy of the hotel Ace Hotel & Swim Club Palm Springs, California The hoteliers behind Ace Hotel & Swim Club had an artistic eye when they reimagined a 1965 Westward Ho Hotel and former Denny’s restaurant as a mid-century modern hotel and King’s Highway restaurant. They outfitted the hotel with vintage furniture and a sun-washed bohemian design. Each year, the hotel invites a new artist to complete a mural on the property ahead of Desert Gold, a twelve-day Coachella oasis that includes meditative sound baths and wellness pop-ups. In 2018, Laura Berger used desert hues in Lifting the Sun, which speaks to humanity’s interconnectivity. In 2019, Chaz Bear painted vibrant florals in Desert Void, which reflects upon the experience of living in the desert. From $159

    Inspiration

    Ski Vermont: Where to Find the Best Snow East of The Rockies

    Known for the birth of the ski tow in 1934, this New England gem can also lay claim to the largest number of Olympians per capita in the US. In fact, 16 of the 244 athletes at the 2018 Winter Olympics hailed from Vermont. Luckily, the resorts hosting these magnificent slopes are ready and waiting for skiers, snowboarders and snow aficionados of all ages and skill levels. But before you strap on your equipment, check out this list of the best areas to visit this winter in Vermont. Sugarbush Resort, Warren Located squarely in the middle of the state, this iconic resort offers 111 trails sprawling over 4000 acres. Spread across Lincoln Peak and Mt. Ellen, yet separated by Slide Brook Basin, it has a vertical drop of 2600ft, and you can easily move between the two mountains using the chairlift and shuttle bus. With 600 skiable areas, including nearly 3000 acres of cross-country terrain, there is an immense variety of slopes to conquer – though beginners will appreciate the Ski & Ride School at Lincoln Peak Village. STAY: The Claybrook Hotel & Residence is our slope-side pick and includes in-room hot tubs, a heated, year-round outdoor pool and a game room to keep the kiddies occupied. You can reserve anything from a studio to a five-bedroom residence – so it’s perfect for a romantic getaway or a family holiday. Bolton Valley Resort, Richmond Perched in the Green Mountains and just 30 minutes from the Burlington airport, this sweet, family-owned resort gives you access to 71 downhill trails for skiing and about 62 miles of Nordic and backcountry trails. Though it’s officially a valley, the alpine village sits atop the mountain overlooking 5000 acres and uses wind power and energy-efficient snowmaking to reduce its diesel and electric power consumption. It also enjoys a vertical drop of 3150ft. Families will love its affordability and the kid-friendly indoor skate-and-bike park. Interested in staying after dark? Bolton Valley offers night skiing until 10pm from Tuesday to Saturday nights. STAY: Basic and affordable, the Inn at Bolton Valley is a ski-in-ski-out slopeside resort with a mix of 60 rooms, suites and condos. Guests receive access to the Bolton Valley Sports Center and can enjoy the pool, hot tub, sauna and gym, as well as a nest of bouncy houses, game room with basketball, ping pong and pool table for the family. Jap Peak Resort, Jay Head north, just a few miles south of the Canadian border, and you’ll find this winter wonderland in the Green Mountains – boasting the highest average snowfall in Vermont and more powder than most east coasters know what to do with. The vertical drop of 2153ft allows for 81 Alpine trails, including just over 60 for advanced and intermediate skiers. But beginners should not despair, there’s plenty of green trails, a Kids Program for ages 4 to 12 years and an Adaptive Program for people with disabilities starting at age 3. A massive indoor waterpark and activity center boasts an ice skating rink, movie theater, climbing gym and arcade – free with on-site lodging, though you’ll need to purchase tickets in advance if you’re just coming for the day. STAY: The Tram Haus Lodge is a charming, suite-only resort offering just under 60 rooms, with units up to three bedrooms. Just a hop, skip and jump from the slopes, it oozes homegrown flavor and is decorated with locally crafted, recycled and re-imagined materials, like handmade maple hardware and reclaimed barn wood furniture. You can choose from slope side or ski-in-ski-out accommodations as well as a coffee shop and full-service spa. Pico Mountain, Mendon Located inside the massive Killington resort, this single-base, easy-to-navigate resort is super family friendly and perfect for those on a budget. A vertical drop of 1967ft, 19 miles of terrain and seven lifts lead to a total of 57 manageable trails. And though there is an impressive 25 intermediate trails, you can also find classic New England steeps or stick with the gentler, winding beginner trails. Four thousand feet of new snowmaking pipe has been added this season, so making the white stuff won’t be a problem. Youth programs and lesson start at age four and go to 14 years old, and kids ski free with the purchase of an adult season pass. STAY: Pico Resort Hotel and Condominiums offers up to three-bedroom accommodations and is walking distance to Pico. Great for groups, the three-bedroom units can sleep up to 10 with a loft and sofabed, and fireplaces are included in most units. Guests can also access the Pico Fitness Center, featuring an indoor pool and gym, and a free shuttle will take you the five miles down the road to any of Killington’s six mountains. Suicide Six, Pomfret This resort is not only the oldest ski resort in America, it is also home to the first “ski lift,” an improvised rope tow built on Hill No. 6 and powered by a Ford Model T. Now, this quaint and accessible area contains an array of terrain and levels of difficulty. Snowboarders will be thrilled to hit the same slopes that hosted the first National Snow Snurfing competition in 1982, and Alpine skiers will appreciate the 650ft vertical drop, three lifts and 24 different trails, broken down almost evenly between expert, intermediate and beginner. You can also rent fat bikes, try your hand at snowshoeing or strap on a set of cross-country skis. STAY: The Woodstock Inn & Resort is a classic, New England ski resort set in a quaint, unspoiled town – while allowing easy access to the slopes of Suicide Six. After a day in the snow, you can take a stroll on Main Street or hit the 10,000 sq ft spa for a little peace and pampering. The Woodstock Athletic Club is also included in your stay and hosts a variety of activities, like racquetball, yoga, an indoor pool and a gym. A Family First-Run package includes a family group lesson and a s’mores kit for apres ski. Magic Mountain, Londonderry Perched on Glebe Mountain, this ski-forward resort is reminiscent of the Swiss Alps, with twisting, narrow trails which were carved out in the 1960s and are still viable today. Out of the 50 trails, 17 of them are expert, and with a vertical drop of 1500ft, you’ll have access to true rugged, vertical skiing – and a handful of double black diamonds. With a premium on adventure and appreciating the natural beauty of your surroundings, this resort is both laid-back and affordable – and even touts special openings during mid-week snowstorms to access the best natural powder. Want to take some time off skis? Race your pals downhill a totally different way at Tubeyland tube park. STAY: The Upper Pass Lodge is rustic, pet friendly and located at the base of Magic Mountain for an easy commute. A homey resort with personalized service, it consists of just 20 rooms, some of which offer bunkbeds or two bedrooms for families and groups – and one of which comes with an en-suite jacuzzi. Keeping with the local theme, the lodge’s bar features cocktails poured exclusively with Vermont-made spirits.

    Road Trips

    The 5 Spookiest Road Trips in America

    Driving alone on a dark highway at night is the start of many a creepy ghost story. But what if some of those eerie tales are based on true stories? Hitchhiking specters, mutant wild animals, phantom vehicles, and vengeful ghosts are all part of the lore entrenched along some US motorways. Some roads are spooky enough just passing by haunted sites, like New York’s “haunted history trail” that leads to dozens of hair-raising spots around the state. And then there are other thoroughfares where the paranormal comes to you – in ways you may never forget. Here are a few of the country’s most worrisome roadways, where what you glimpse in the rear-view mirror may not be just your imagination. 1. Clinton Road, New Jersey Among a half-dozen supposedly haunted roads in New Jersey, Clinton Road in Passaic County casts the darkest shadows. The 10-mile stretch of highway, just an hour’s drive from Manhattan, may seem ordinary, until, for example, the ghost boy near the Clinton Reservoir pelts you with coins or leers at you from his watery reflection. Perhaps this little boy is in cahoots with the lady ghost who’s said to zoom around in her doomed Camaro, which crashed on Clinton Road in 1988 (mention her on the drive and you may trigger a sighting). Phantom trucks and detached headlights could light the way to more sightings, like ghostly park rangers or other specters who met their demise on bridges or the sharp “dead man’s curve.” Even if you don’t believe in ghosts, Clinton Road’s sordid history as a meeting place for the KKK and Satanists left spooky vibes. Not to mention the mutant animal spooks some believe crossbred when the West Milford Jungle Habitat safari park shuttered in 1976, leaving behind supernatural creatures that roam the road by night. New Jersey is home to several more spooky roads, so you can heighten your frights with Halloween road trips along Shades of Death Road in Warren County, Indian Curse Road in Deptford, Mt. Misery Road in Pemberton, and other eerie routes. (But only Clinton Road inspired a movie of the same name, released in 2019 and starring Ice-T.) 2. Archer Road, Illinois Some think that south Chicago is scary, but it’s got nothing on spooky Archer Road. Just south of town in Justice, Illinois, the boulevard dates back centuries as a Native American trail. In 1930, it was paved and became Archer Road (aka Archer Avenue), home to a shadowy legacy where phantom hitchhikers and ghouls suddenly appear. But its legend arrived with “Resurrection Mary,” Chicago’s most famous ghost. The story goes that back in the 1930s, dolled-up, blonde-haired Mary left a nearby party angry after a fight and was struck by a passing car. Ever since, drivers have claimed to see her hitching a ride in the night. On occasion, she’s even hopped in and given directions to Archer Road’s 540-acre Resurrection Cemetery – where she suddenly vanished. Mary’s mystery got more peculiar in 1976, when a local called Justice police about the lady he saw inside the cemetery, grasping its iron fence. The police soon arrived to find the cemetery deserted, only to find the fence bars scorched and bent in the shape of hand prints. 3. Kelly Road, Pennsylvania Whether it’s the alleged cult activity or ancient curse cast on Kelly Road, the “Mystery Mile” of Ohioville, Pennsylvania, is famous for mighty bizarre stories. The strip is shaded by thick, uninhabited woods that local folks say is home to paranormal disturbances and untold history. But it’s the animals that seem most disturbed when traveling on Kelly Road. Even the most docile of pets are said to become angry and even violent there, chasing humans and other animals with sudden aggression. Are they seeing spirits or hearing noises fit only for animal ears? Who’s to say. But most agree that, thankfully, the aggressive behavior subsides by reaching the one-mile marker into refreshingly unhaunted territory. 4. Bray Road, Wisconsin Animals turning rabid can be terrifying, but even more disturbing is catching sight of a seven-foot-tall werewolf on a quiet country throughway. Along the seemingly ordinary Bray Road just northeast of Elkhorn, Wisconsin, the “Beast of Bray” is said to roam the fields and forests by night. Appearing like a wolf walking on either two or four legs, the giant creature also resembles Bigfoot descriptions, with fangs, claws, and brown and gray fur. (He’s among several alleged Bigfoot encounters in Wisconsin.) The first sighting was reported in 1936. But in the 1980s and 90s there were steady reports of the beast, with reporter Linda Godfrey so convinced of its existence via eye witness accounts, in 2003 she published The Beast of Bray Road: Tailing Wisconsin's Werewolf. 5. I-4, Florida One of the country’s longest haunted highways is a 140-mile length of Florida freeway. Nicknamed the “I-4 dead zone,” Interstate 4 stretches from Orlando to Daytona, where traffic accidents, injuries, and other strange happenings have held strong for more than a half-century. The creepiness began in when interstate construction workers discovered graves from early American settlers who perished from yellow fever. Nevertheless, highway construction continued. Then on opening day, a tractor-trailer that jackknifed near the graves brought the highways’ first fatality. More than 1,500 accidents have plagued the interstate since 1969, not to mention the phantom trucks and cars that have been spotted speeding and crashing there. Hurricanes and tornadoes are said to have traveled exactly along I-4, while alleged hitchhiking apparitions, floating headlights, and freezing asphalt on hot days only add to the freakiness. Motorists: Remember to keep your focus on the road and keep your speed slow and steady, regardless of possible otherworldly roadside attractions.

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    DESTINATION IN Ohio

    Kent

    Kent is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the largest city in Portage County. It is located along the Cuyahoga River in Northeast Ohio on the western edge of the county. The population was 28,904 in the 2010 Census and was estimated at 29,646 in 2019. The city is counted as part of the Akron Metropolitan Statistical Area and the larger Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area. Part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, Kent was settled in 1805 and was known for many years as Franklin Mills. Settlers were attracted to the area due to its location along the Cuyahoga River as a place for water-powered mills. Later development came in the 1830s and 1840s as a result of the settlement's position along the route of the Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal. Leading up to the American Civil War, Franklin Mills was noted for its activity in the Underground Railroad. With the decline of the canal and the emergence of the railroad, the town became the home of the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad maintenance shops through the influence of Marvin Kent. In 1864 the town was renamed Kent in honor of and in gratitude for Marvin Kent's efforts. It was incorporated as a village in 1867 and became a city after the 1920 Census. Today Kent is a college town best known as the home of the main campus of Kent State University, founded in 1910, and as the site of the 1970 Kent State shootings. Historically a manufacturing center, education is the city's largest economic sector with Kent State University being the city's, and one of the region's, largest employers. The Kent City School District and the Kent Free Library provide additional education opportunities and resources. Many of Kent's demographic elements are influenced by the presence of the university, particularly the median age, median income, and those living below the poverty level. The city is governed by a council-manager system with a city manager, a nine-member city council, and a mayor. Kent has nearly 20 parks and preserves and hosts a number of annual festivals including ones related to Earth Day, folk music, and the U.S. Independence Day. In addition to the Kent State athletic teams, the city also hosts a number of amateur and local sporting events at various times during the year. Kent is part of the Cleveland-Akron media market and is the city of license for three local radio stations and three television stations and includes the regional affiliates for National Public Radio (NPR) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Local transportation infrastructure includes a public bus service and hike-and-bike trails. As the home of the Davey Tree Expert Company, Kent is known as "The Tree City" while residents are referred to as "Kentites". The city has produced a number of notable individuals, particularly in politics, athletics, and the entertainment industry.