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  • Bryce Canyon, Utah
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    Garfield County,

    Utah

    Marcus Lindstrom / iStock

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    Bryce Canyon Country

    Bryce Canyon Country is the nickname for Garfield County, Utah. As the main tourist attraction in the county, Bryce Canyon National Park is what most people come to this area to experience. And it’s well worth the trip!

    Bryce Canyon is a great destination for any type of visitor. Outdoor enthusiasts can get all of the hiking and backcountry exploring that they want. People who prefer relaxing in nature appreciate the quiet setting and beautiful scenery. Photographers love the breathtaking views of the unique landscape. Bryce Canyon has something for everyone, all year round.

    Bryce Canyon National Park, open all year for camping and tours, is located near the junction of Utah Scenic Byway 12 and U-63. Bryce Canyon is a series of large natural amphitheaters with thousands of multi-colored rock pinnacles called “hoodoos.” These formations shine brilliantly under sunny skies, but glow most exquisitely under the soft light of the rising or setting sun. Visitors often drive through the 20-mile-long park, stopping to take in scenic viewpoints. You’ll be astonished by the contrast of the red rock formations and vibrant blue sky.

    Find more things to do, itinerary ideas, updated news and events, and plan your perfect trip to Garfield County
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    DESTINATION IN Utah

    Lake Powell

    Lake Powell is a man-made reservoir on the Colorado River in Utah and Arizona, United States. It is a major vacation spot visited by approximately two million people every year. It is the second largest man-made reservoir by maximum water capacity in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre-feet (3.0001×1010 m3) of water when full. However, due to high water withdrawals for human and agricultural consumption, and because of subsequent droughts in the area, Lake Mead has fallen below Lake Powell in size several times during the 21st century in terms of volume of water, depth and surface area. Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the Glen Canyon Dam, which also led to the 1972 creation of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, a popular summer destination of public land managed by the National Park Service. The reservoir is named for John Wesley Powell, a civil war veteran who explored the river via three wooden boats in 1869. It primarily lies in parts of Garfield, Kane, and San Juan counties in southern Utah, with a small portion in Coconino County in northern Arizona. The northern limits of the lake extend at least as far as the Hite Crossing Bridge. Lake Powell is a water storage facility for the Upper Basin states of the Colorado River Compact (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico). The Compact specifies that the Upper Basin states are to provide a minimum annual flow of 7,500,000 acre-feet (9.3 km3) to the Lower Basin states (Arizona, Nevada, and California).

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