ADVERTISEMENT

Best Places to See Modern & Contemporary Art in NYC While MoMA Is Closed for Renovations

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello
January 12, 2022
Children looking at a Jackson Pollock painting at the Met Museum, NYC
Bumbleedee/Dreamstime
One of New York’s best-known museums is closed until October, but the Big Apple is still tops for groundbreaking visual art.

For art lovers who call New York City home or who visit frequently, the next few months are a good-news-bad-news situation.

The bad news: The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is closed until October 21 for a $450 million renovation. That means that Van Gogh's "The Starry Night," Mondrian's "Broadway Boogie Woogie," and other iconic works of modernism are out of reach for New Yorkers for the next three months.

But take a deep breath...

The good news: When MoMA reopens, it will display more of its stunning permanent collection than ever before thanks to an additional 40,000 square feet. More good news: The renovation coincides with an overhaul of the way MoMA tells the story of modern art, which promises to be more inclusive of groundbreaking artists of the past 150 years or so who did not happen to be male or of European descent.

A City of Galleries & Museums

And one more piece of good news for those craving a modern- or contemporary-art fix right now: Even with MoMA temporarily closed, New York City still boasts an unparalleled array of places to see impressionist, cubist, abstract, pop, conceptual, and every other conceivable variety of “modern” visual art that has happened or is happening.

Some of the world’s most successful galleries are either headquartered or represented in NYC. To see what’s cooking in the art world at this very minute, stop by: David Zwirner Gallery (537 W. 20th Street, davidzwirner.com), the Brant Foundation Art Study Center (421 E. 6th Street, brantfoundation.org), Gagosian Gallery (555 W. 24th Street, gagosian.com), or other galleries recommended by NYC & Company.

Here, to tide you over till MoMA reopens, NYC’s "other" major collections of modern and contemporary art.

The Met & Met Breuer

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 Fifth Avenue, metmuseum.org) houses New York City’s largest art collection, ranging from ancient artifacts from Egypt and Assyria to a wealth of important work from the late 19th century through the 20th and beyond, including the eye-popping experiments of Monet, Van Gogh, and Cezanne. Contemporary photography is a fixture here, as are the immense, colorful paintings of modernist Ellsworth Kelly, and Jackson Pollock's "Autumn Rhythm." The Met Breuer (945 Madison Avenue, metmuseum.org) is devoted entirely to modern and contemporary work, a great place to see the work of 20th-century masters and also of living artists.

The Guggenheim

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1071 Fifth Avenue, guggenheim.org) is as well-known for its unique spiral design, by iconic architect Frank Lloyd Wright, as for its great collection, much of it displayed along the winding, rising surface of the interior spiral. Don’t forget to look up at the incredible ceiling, and, through November 6, catch “'Defaced': The Untold Story,” about the remarkable work by Jean-Michel Basquiat.

The Whitney

The Whitney Museum of American Art (99 Gansevoort Street, whitney.org) boasts a wonderful collection of 20th- and 21st-century American art, and visitors to NYC this summer can catch “Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s” through August 18 and the Whitney Biennial 2019 through September 22, spotlighting some of the most cutting-edge contemporary artists working today.

CLUB DISCOUNTS

Save up to 50% on Hotels

1 rooms, 1 guests
ADVERTISEMENT
Keep reading
Travel Tips

Where to Find Free Broadway Shows in NYC This Summer

This summer, you won’t have to visit New York’s theater district to get a taste of the Broadway action. Broadway in the Boros Broadway in the Boros releases musical theater talent from the confines of Times Square for a free lunchtime performance series. Starting this month, as part of the city’s fourth-annual Broadway in the Boros series, cast and musicians from eight big musicals will take the show on the road, making the magic happen in public plazas across the outer boroughs. The lunchtime series kicked off earlier this month in Brooklyn, with the critical darlings from Hadestown (nominated in 14 Tony categories and victorious in eight) partnering with the Mean Girls crew at Bed-Stuy’s Restoration Plaza. The Prom & LGBTQ Pride in Queens On June 28, for World Pride Month, representatives from LGBTQ hit The Prom and contemporary sci-fi musical Be More Chill will perform in Jackson Heights, Queens. “My district is home to one of the largest and most diverse LGBTQ communities in the nation,” said NYC Council LGBT Caucus chair Daniel Dromm, ”which makes this event’s official World Pride designation very fitting.” Beautiful in the Bronx & Beetlejuice in Staten Island The party continues in the Bronx on July 12, with numbers from Beautiful: The Carole King Musical and Wicked, and wraps in Staten Island on July 28 with newcomer Beetlejuice and long-running fan favorite Chicago rounding out the bill. (For the uninitiated, the free ferry from lower Manhattan to Staten Island offers great views of the skyline and the Statue of Liberty, and the neighborhood of St. George has plenty to keep you busy once you reach the other side.) “The Arts Are For Everyone” Providing free entertainment far from the chaos of Times Square, the program aims to connect local communities – and lucky travelers too – with a hallmark of the city that’s often inaccessible to its broader population. “The arts are for everyone,” said Brooklyn borough President Eric Adams, “and the cast members, musicians, and cultural partners who make this series possible embody that ongoing mission.”

Travel Tips

TSA Warning: Security Lines Are Going to Get Longer

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officials are warning that an expected increase in airline passengers, and an insufficient increase in TSA staffing, will lead to longer airport security lines, reports the Washington Post. TSA Staff Face Difficult Job, Low Pay An expected 4.5 percent increase in airline passengers and a request for a 2.5 increase in staffing for fiscal 2020 equals headaches for both travelers and TSA staff. As we witnessed during the government shutdown earlier this year, TSA officers will continue to follow protocols, one passenger at a time, regardless of staffing levels or long lines, in order to maintain the highest standard of flight safety and security. But TSA officers are already facing other challenges, including some of the lowest salaries in the federal government (with full-time pay starting around $33,000/year) and some of the highest rates of turnover. Redeployment to the Southwest Border Another TSA challenge is the Trump administration’s proposal to move hundreds of TSA officers to the Southwest border to handle immigration duties, which could have an impact on airport security, especially during the morning peak hours of the summer high season, the Post reports. PreCheck May Get Slower Too TSA PreCheck has been one of the best ways to ensure an efficient trip through airport security, but even PreCheck may slow down as the TSA moves to make enrolling in PreCheck easier than ever, reports Bloomberg. TSA estimates that 9 million “high-frequency travelers” aren’t enrolled in PreCheck yet, and an additional 80 million travelers who fly at least once per year are also not enrolled. If the initiatve to add even a portion of those frequent air travelers to PreCheck succeeds amid TSA understaffing and redeployment to the border, even PreCheck lines will likely get longer. What Every Air Traveler Can Do Right Now Budget Travel’s advice for getting through airport security remains the same regardless of TSA staffing: Get to the airport with plenty of extra time, pack smart, and if you haven’t already started the PreCheck application, do it now. Learn the TSA’s top 5 summer travel tips, and pack your patience.

Travel Tips

Visiting Rome: The New Rules You’d Better Know

Rome has introduced a spate of new rules and regulations to govern decorum in the city; cracking down on everyday behaviors such as the impolite ways in which people drink water from public fountains and banning people from dragging wheeled suitcases down historic steps. Managing the Strains of Tourism Rome’s new wave of rules are part of an Italian-wide measure to manage tourist strains on cities and curb anti-social behavior in general. With summer travel season now in full bloom, Rome city council has updated existing legislation that dates all the way back to 1946 with the objective of improving city life for residents and tourists. Don’t Jump in the Fountains (And Other Sensible New Rules) The new rules include penalties for those who jump into water fountains. Men are also prohibited from walking around the city bare-chested, while the popular tourist tradition of attaching “love padlocks” will incur a fine. Overly-messy eating around historic monuments is also forbidden and yes, that could mean it’s no longer possible to cool down with a creamy gelato on the Spanish Steps. How to Legally Drink the Water (Really) Tourists will need to be especially considerate about how they drink water from the city’s public drinking fountains, known as nasoni. Authorities have decreed it’s not acceptable for thirsty tourists to let their mouth touch the metal spout, instead they can cup their hands under the the spout or place their fingers under the stream to direct an arc of water to directly to their mouths like the Romans do. Cracking Down on Street Trading, Ticket Hawking, and, Um… Hanging Laundry? Illegal street-trading and ticket-touting outside tourist sites have also been banned, as has the age-old Roman practice of hanging laundry out to dry on clothing lines between neighboring buildings. Organized pub crawls and those who advertise “skip-the-line” tours outside historic monuments such as the Vatican are also banned. No Performing on Public Transportation Another regulation decrees that singing, playing instruments or busking on public transport in the city is banned. People are also no longer allowed to take prams or wheeled suitcases up or down historic steps, such as the Spanish Steps. How Will the New Rules Be Enforced? It’s still unclear how these new rules will be imposed or what fines people could incur if they’re caught breaking them. It has been announced that police will be patrolling historic sites, however, and tourists who behave badly could now be faced with a daspo, or temporary ban from returning to the area in which they caused an offense.

Travel Tips

6 Essential Apps for Budget Travelers

Whether it’s spending hours pouring over airfare, sleeping in noisy hostels or battling through the red-eye squished in coach, traveling on a budget can feel like a hustle. Thankfully there are a handful of travel apps that can help save a few bucks on your dream trip – and help you plan for your next one. These are six of our favorite apps for budget travel. 1. Tripcoin The best way to save on travel is to know where your money is going. Tripcoin is an expense-tracking app that works offline, which is great for international travelers who aren’t buying a local SIM card. A geo-location feature breaks expenses down by country, and a currency converter automatically converts new expenses into your home currency. Helpful graphs also outline daily expenditures, and you can create unlimited trips to track how much each jaunt costs. 2. Skiplagged Skiplagged capitalizes on a loophole airlines hate: hidden-city ticketing. It works like this: sometimes booking a flight beyond your intended destination is cheaper than simply booking a nonstop flight. For example, say you want to fly from San Francisco to Washington, DC. A regular round-trip ticket would cost $340, but a route from San Francisco to New York, with a layover in DC, is $140. You simply walk off the plane in DC. Airlines have gone to great lengths to put a stop to it (United sued Skiplagged in 2018, and lost). Skiplagged advises not tying any purchases to frequent flier accounts, as airlines have been known to invalidate air miles you’ve accrued with them. 3. Splitwise If you’re traveling with friends, Splitwise can help keep track of who owes what to whom. The app keeps a running total of IOUs, so everyone gets paid back at once, rather in than a bunch of smaller transactions. Automatic email reminders keep the misers in check, and integration with PayPal and Venmo (US only) makes settling up friendly debts a breeze. 4. Hopper There are several apps that analyze historical airfare data to determine whether it’s the right time to buy your airfare, but few of them are as cleanly presented and feature-packed as Hopper. Features like notifications when the airfare for a specific route drops, price prediction advice that gives you an idea when it's the right time to buy, and an option for flexible dates give Hopper a leg up on airfare deals. Put in your home city and destination and Hopper displays a calendar for the year ahead, with color-coded dates indicating when prices should be at their lowest. 5. HotelTonight HotelTonight allows travelers to arrange last-minute accommodations, often at prices lower than if they’d booked in advance. These last-minute reservations often have deep discounts so hotels can increase occupancy on rooms they weren't able to book in advance. A ‘Daily Deal’ feature also unlocks a reduced-priced hotel that must be booked within 15 minutes. If you don’t mind waiting until the day before or day of to book your hotel, this app can save bundles on accommodation. 6. AirHelp Lost luggage and delayed or canceled flights can be a costly experience, but many travelers are eligible for compensation when something goes wrong. Often, however, there are dozens of hoops to jump through – forms to fill out, phone numbers to call and lines to wait in. AirHelptakes care of most of the process: you add your trip details, AirHelp determines if the airline owes you money, and then they send you the money. The catch: AirHelp takes a cut of the compensation as the price for convenience.