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The Best Glamping Getaways In North America for Under $150

By Mike & Anne Howard
October 22, 2019
A lake with mountains in the horizon and colorful cottages on the left bank
© Justine Crawford​
Fresh off the back of researching their new guide to glamping, "Comfortably Wild," Mike and Anne Howard have some things to say about the outdoorsy travel trend. Here are their favorite glamping spots in North America under $150.

You don’t have to be Prince Harry on honeymoon to afford unforgettable glamping destinations. There are tons of budget-friendly glamping options throughout North America, places where incredible outdoor experiences are right next to plush hideaways. You just need to know where to find them.

To research our new book, Comfortably Wild, we spent three years, traveling 73,000 miles across 9 countries in search of the best glamping destinations in North America. Even after staying at Relais & Châteaux treehouses and Forbes Five-Star Ranches, some of our favorite outdoor getaways were those under $150 a night. Packed with character, natural beauty, and unconventional experiences, these affordable picks will make you feel like you’ve struck it rich.

Cassiar Cannery, British Columbia

Take the train through the Canadian Rockies and along the Skeena River to the secret stop: Cassiar, the former metropolis of the BC fishing world. Over the course of 107 years, tens of thousands of workers from around the world ran 22 different canneries along these shores. The last one standing and longest consecutively operating cannery on the West Coast was none other than Cassiar. Walking the historic grounds with Justine Crawford and Mark Bell, owners of this salmon-cannery-turned-glamping retreat, this forgotten world comes into focus. With their vivid descriptions, you can imagine the expansive dock, net loft, machine shop, and general store bustling with life. The five jewel-colored cottages with waves lapping beneath their porches, once the homes of the cannery managers, are now yours to enjoy. Take a jet boat to see the remnants of fellow canneries, or catch some salmon of your own. Want to dig deeper into the area’s history, ecology, or meditative qualities? You’ll love their multiday retreats.

Luna Mystica, New Mexico

What do you get when you cross Airstream trailers, a brewery, a music venue, and snowcapped mountains with an art colony? Glamping heaven. Taos Mesa Brewery was built on 24 acres to relish the stunning scenery of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and have ample space for festival camping. Seeing people enjoy themselves at multiday concerts, brewery cofounder Dan Irion and his brother Ryan (a civil engineer that designs RV parks), had the brilliant idea to create Luna Mystica. Each camper has been renovated with the stories of their original owners and travel history top of mind. You’ll meet Ralphie, the Airstream who spent 55 years cruising the valleys of New Mexico, and Rosie, who was in a traveling circus and decorated to reflect her gypsy flair. Staying next to the hottest music venue in Taos affords a rare combo of being in nature and the heart of the action. For even more culture, you’re 15 minutes from the art galleries downtown and the Unesco World Heritage site of Taos Pueblo.

Honaunau Farm, Hawaii

With the opportunity to watch the lava flow at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, stargaze from the tallest mountain in the Pacific, and stroll green sand beaches, anyone would want to stay on the island of Hawaiʻi – but you’re the savvy traveler that knows a big-box hotel isn’t the way to experience its natural beauty. Stay at Honaunau Farm and you’ll have pristine forest all the way from your ocean-view cottage to Mauna Loa volcano. From this organic farm, you can easily access the tourist attractions while having the local insights and hands-on access to Hawaii’s bounty. See the landscape from the eyes of a permaculturist, learn the latest in medicinal hemp, take a class on regenerative farming, and eat all the tropical fruit you can carry back to your safari tent or tea house. Honaunau brings the Big Island back to its purest form.

The Cozy Peach, Arizona

Planting seeds since 1941, the Schnepfs are excellent farmers, nationally renowned for their peaches, but their ambitions were always bigger than stone fruit. Looking to celebrate the farming heritage of Maricopa County, Arizona, they have restored the area’s historic farmhouse buildings, created a U-pick veggie patch, and they host nearly 100 days worth of festivals per year. To further immerse guests into their 300 acres of orchards, forest, and fields, they opened Cozy Peach glamping, with 10 vintage travel trailers. Just the right blend of nostalgic and contemporary, each camper has been polished like a gem. Take one of the complimentary John Deere bicycles for a ride among 5,000 peach trees, and join the farm happenings – including gardening, a cooking class, or one of their multiday festivals with live music, vintage amusement rides, and crafts.

Dreamsea Surf Camp, Costa Rica

Tamarindo, Costa Rica, is known as one of the world’s best beaches to learn surfing. Dive in with a seven-night stay at Dreamsea’s surf-camp-meets-yoga-retreat. Settle into your bell tent, complete with private deck to enjoy the jungle’s tropical birds and acrobatic howler monkeys, and meet your professional instructors and new surf buddies. Try the breaks at any of their four neighboring beaches, then stretch it out each evening with some downward dog. Promoting a healthy lifestyle, the chefs embrace Costa Rica’s tropical bounty and spice it up with global recipes. Stay for a one- or two-week session (it’s all-inclusive for less than $100 per person per day), or make it a true Endless Summer by applying to be a volunteer in exchange for free room & board (yeah, both kinds).

Mendocino Grove, California

Many city folk like the idea of a nature getaway, but may feel a little better knowing that top-notch restaurants, art galleries, and Pilates studios are nearby (you know, in case of emergency). When the founders of Mendocino Grove spotted a property on the wooded bluffs of the Pacific, just a quarter-mile from downtown, they thought, “This is the yin and yang we all need.” Mendocino was once a prosperous logging town with Victorian mansions but today the 19th-century buildings are now home to bookstores, coffee shops, organic markets, and fantastic restaurants. Trees once cut at the mills are now protected by seven state parks within a 10-mile radius. From Mendocino Grove, you can access hikes into the grand fir forest, vegan white-tablecloth meals, and award-winning theater…without even getting into a car. Though with a camp this seductive, you might never make it to town. Breakfast is served in the meadow followed by weekend yoga, your tent has ocean views, and a s’mores kit can be delivered right to your fire ring.

Good Knights, Alberta

Inspired by the fanciful architecture, decor, and pursuits of medieval European nobility, Good Knights is where you can play princess and feel like a king. After a decade of hosting a Renaissance fair–style festival on their property in the Alberta countryside, they decided to keep the fantasy going for guests all summer long. They built a feast hall, longbow archery range, tournament field, classical arts studio, and lavish tents, all in 14th-century fashion. In 2017 they opened their wooden gates and were an instant hit with the fantasy crowd. But the real test of their success? Skeptics like us. We initially came for the novelty of Good Knights, but after seeing everyone dressed up, learning new skills, and frolicking in merriment, we couldn’t resist the magic of this place.

Great Huts, Jamaica

After working as a physician around Jamaica for decades, Dr. Paul Rhodes had a vision for a resort that would celebrate the country’s West African roots and aid his humanitarian work. Collaborating with local architects and artists, Great Huts has built African-inspired structures with motifs from the Akan, Igbo, Ibibio, Mandingo, and Yoruba tribes (from which most Jamaicans descend). Bamboo huts, almond treehouses, stone towers, millet silos, and royal-themed rooms showcase African art and antiques alongside local works. More than 250 pieces of art adorn the seaside property, and various cultural events, including four-day art and film festivals, happen throughout the year. A portion of each guest’s stay and all proceeds from the festivals support eastern Jamaica’s only homeless rehabilitation center, cofounded by Dr. Paul (as he’s fondly called around the island). If you’re looking for even more good vibes at Great Huts, just practice yoga overlooking the Caribbean Sea, soak in the cliffside pool, or dance the night away to live reggae.

Campera Hotel Burbuja, Mexico

One of the only bubble hotels in North America, Campera Hotel Burbuja’s spherical tents line up like a string of pearls against the Docepiedras vineyard of Baja California. A well-crafted French design pressurizes the bubble so that only a thin clear wall separates you from the vines and the Milky Way. Draw back the privacy curtains on your canopy bed and catch a shooting star without leaving your silky sheets. Wake up to a sea of vines and a day of vineyard hopping at Valle de Guadalupe’s 80 wineries, or just open your minibar to sample the wines grown from grapes outside your see-through door.

Asheville Glamping, North Carolina

Joanna Cahill doesn’t just own Asheville Glamping; she lives it. While dreaming up the concept for this ultra-hip glamp camp, Joanna lived in a yurt she built herself. When she was able to buy the rolling hills just 10 miles north of downtown, she moved into a vintage trailer to save up for geodesic domes. Today the 18-acre property is a glamper’s candy shop, with 5 completely different structures – from bell tents to treehouses. Having started this glamping business in her 20s, she knows what millennials want—a two-story dome with a corkscrew slide to get down to the living room. They want the opportunity to chill around a firepit with views to the Blue Ridge Mountains and hop an Uber when there’s a good indie band in “Beer City,” USA. So whether you’re a hipster or a hiker rolling through North Carolina, you know where to stay.

This article is adapted from Comfortably Wild: The Best Glamping Destinations in North America, published by Falcon Guides and written by Mike & Anne Howard of HoneyTrek.com.

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Inspiration

Seven Top Mural Hotels in the U.S.

Have you ever stayed in two different hotels on separate coasts and seen the same art prints in each? You’re not alone. Hotels have long rubber-stamped their art collections, though that’s changing. The Alexander hotel in Indianapolis, for one, has an accredited art museum curating its collection. Hotels are also coloring outside the frame and decorating with street-art-turned-interior-décor. Some hotels commission internationally known artists to create one-of-a-kind murals, while others hire locally to give the interior a distinctive sense of place. Either way, the muralists transform the hotels into pieces of art in their own rights. Here are seven hotels with the best – and yes, most Instagram-able – murals in the country. Mural by Asend at Hotel Chicago West Loop, courtesy of the hotel Hotel Chicago West Loop Chicago, Illinois Six rooms in Hotel Chicago West Loop’s art-centric annex immerse guests in Windy City culture. Chicago-based artists including Josh Grotto, Brandin Hurley, Elloo, and Ascend have lent their talents to mural rooms, which showcase Chicago architecture, music, and history. Ascend’s work is exhibited locally and internationally, including in top-notch art fairs like Art Basel; his paintings combine a classical approach to portraiture with contemporary backgrounds. When not in use, the street-art rooms are open for viewing, giving the public a chance to see the works outside hallowed museum halls or traditional galleries. The artistry is growing: In late 2019, street artists will install another six eye-popping guestroom murals. Art students will join the artists for mentorship during the installation of the new murals. Hotel Chicago West Loop plans eventually to install paintings in the majority of its 116 rooms. From $119 Nativo Lodge Albuquerque, New Mexico Heritage Hotels & Resorts called upon a stable of contemporary Native American artists to paint 47 guest rooms (and counting) with murals. The rooms feel like living inside an artwork; they touch every wall and even flow into the bathroom and vanity spaces. Their artwork is rooted in cultural traditions and symbolism, but it’s expressed in vibrant and surprising ways. For example, in Love Movement, Jaque Fragua researched pre-Columbian Mesoamerican pottery designs in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. and expressed these designs in a hot-pink background splashed with gold paint. In Sustenance, Warren Montoya expresses traditional hunting practices of the Pueblo (Native American) people in the Rio Grande Valley. From $118. Hotel Des Arts San Francisco, California Hotel Des Arts certainly lives up to its artistic name: More than fifty guest rooms show installations or edgy, graffiti-art inspired murals. Internationally known street artists including Shepard Fairey, David Choe, Buff Monster, Jeremy Fish and Casey O’Connell have painted the one-of-a-kind room. David Cloe, a Los Angeles artist who painted room 304, has collaborated with everyone from Facebook to Jay-Z. Shepard Fairy, the South Carolina artist behind room 210, is perhaps most well-known for illustrating former President Barack Obama’s “Hope” campaign poster. From $159 Hotel McCoy Tucson, Arizona In its first life, Hotel McCoy was a 1969 motor lodge, but in the fall of 2018 new owners transformed it into an art hotel. Hotel McCoy has worked with 48 (and growing) Tucson artists on the outdoor murals, and via the lobby art gallery and in-room art. The murals capture Tucson’s creative side. They serve another purpose, too: “The inspiration behind my idea to incorporate art comes from my love of travel and addressing the feeling of homesickness that comes from it,” says Nicole Dahl, general manager and creative director. “When we travel, often our hotel leaves us feeling empty, disconnected if you will. We wanted to fix that and offer people a place where they could stay and feel a connection.” From $109 Hotel Vintage Portland Portland, Oregon Graffiti artist Andrew Horner freestyled three of Hotel Vintage Portland’s original murals in 2015. Just him, spray paint, and inspiration emanating from Portland’s sub-cultures. He incorporated Portland landmarks and symbols, like roses after the City of Roses’ nickname, in paintings located in a game lounge, downstairs hallways, and the main entrance stairwell. In 2016, this trio doubled when Viva La Free, a Portland non-profit that teaches at-risk youth to use art for healing, painted three additional murals on the fences of the Urban Soak Suites. The hotel is an urban outpost in Oregon’s wine country, the Willamette Valley, and the murals have a (perhaps surprising) similarity to wine: Just as a wine’s flavor blossoms with each sip, the murals reveal hidden elements over time. From $218 W Hotel Bellevue Bellevue, Washington The artists behind W Hotel Bellevue’s six murals may hail from outside the Pacific Northwest, but they certainly capture its vibe. Baltimore-based street artist Gaia gives a lesson in the past, present, and future of Bellevue in Settler Futurity. The towering, three-story mural on the main stairwell showcases the city’s agricultural roots with depictions of strawberry fields, and points to its present and future with aviation references. Other murals include three by Japanese-born and Brooklyn-based Lady Aiko, and two murals by San Francisco artist Zio Ziegler. The W brand hotels emphasize design and the Bellevue edition lives up to that mission. From $289. Mural by Chaz Bear at Ace Hotel and Swim Club, courtesy of the hotel Ace Hotel & Swim Club Palm Springs, California The hoteliers behind Ace Hotel & Swim Club had an artistic eye when they reimagined a 1965 Westward Ho Hotel and former Denny’s restaurant as a mid-century modern hotel and King’s Highway restaurant. They outfitted the hotel with vintage furniture and a sun-washed bohemian design. Each year, the hotel invites a new artist to complete a mural on the property ahead of Desert Gold, a twelve-day Coachella oasis that includes meditative sound baths and wellness pop-ups. In 2018, Laura Berger used desert hues in Lifting the Sun, which speaks to humanity’s interconnectivity. In 2019, Chaz Bear painted vibrant florals in Desert Void, which reflects upon the experience of living in the desert. From $159

Inspiration

Ski Vermont: Where to Find the Best Snow East of The Rockies

Known for the birth of the ski tow in 1934, this New England gem can also lay claim to the largest number of Olympians per capita in the US. In fact, 16 of the 244 athletes at the 2018 Winter Olympics hailed from Vermont. Luckily, the resorts hosting these magnificent slopes are ready and waiting for skiers, snowboarders and snow aficionados of all ages and skill levels. But before you strap on your equipment, check out this list of the best areas to visit this winter in Vermont. Sugarbush Resort, Warren Located squarely in the middle of the state, this iconic resort offers 111 trails sprawling over 4000 acres. Spread across Lincoln Peak and Mt. Ellen, yet separated by Slide Brook Basin, it has a vertical drop of 2600ft, and you can easily move between the two mountains using the chairlift and shuttle bus. With 600 skiable areas, including nearly 3000 acres of cross-country terrain, there is an immense variety of slopes to conquer – though beginners will appreciate the Ski & Ride School at Lincoln Peak Village. STAY: The Claybrook Hotel & Residence is our slope-side pick and includes in-room hot tubs, a heated, year-round outdoor pool and a game room to keep the kiddies occupied. You can reserve anything from a studio to a five-bedroom residence – so it’s perfect for a romantic getaway or a family holiday. Bolton Valley Resort, Richmond Perched in the Green Mountains and just 30 minutes from the Burlington airport, this sweet, family-owned resort gives you access to 71 downhill trails for skiing and about 62 miles of Nordic and backcountry trails. Though it’s officially a valley, the alpine village sits atop the mountain overlooking 5000 acres and uses wind power and energy-efficient snowmaking to reduce its diesel and electric power consumption. It also enjoys a vertical drop of 3150ft. Families will love its affordability and the kid-friendly indoor skate-and-bike park. Interested in staying after dark? Bolton Valley offers night skiing until 10pm from Tuesday to Saturday nights. STAY: Basic and affordable, the Inn at Bolton Valley is a ski-in-ski-out slopeside resort with a mix of 60 rooms, suites and condos. Guests receive access to the Bolton Valley Sports Center and can enjoy the pool, hot tub, sauna and gym, as well as a nest of bouncy houses, game room with basketball, ping pong and pool table for the family. Jap Peak Resort, Jay Head north, just a few miles south of the Canadian border, and you’ll find this winter wonderland in the Green Mountains – boasting the highest average snowfall in Vermont and more powder than most east coasters know what to do with. The vertical drop of 2153ft allows for 81 Alpine trails, including just over 60 for advanced and intermediate skiers. But beginners should not despair, there’s plenty of green trails, a Kids Program for ages 4 to 12 years and an Adaptive Program for people with disabilities starting at age 3. A massive indoor waterpark and activity center boasts an ice skating rink, movie theater, climbing gym and arcade – free with on-site lodging, though you’ll need to purchase tickets in advance if you’re just coming for the day. STAY: The Tram Haus Lodge is a charming, suite-only resort offering just under 60 rooms, with units up to three bedrooms. Just a hop, skip and jump from the slopes, it oozes homegrown flavor and is decorated with locally crafted, recycled and re-imagined materials, like handmade maple hardware and reclaimed barn wood furniture. You can choose from slope side or ski-in-ski-out accommodations as well as a coffee shop and full-service spa. Pico Mountain, Mendon Located inside the massive Killington resort, this single-base, easy-to-navigate resort is super family friendly and perfect for those on a budget. A vertical drop of 1967ft, 19 miles of terrain and seven lifts lead to a total of 57 manageable trails. And though there is an impressive 25 intermediate trails, you can also find classic New England steeps or stick with the gentler, winding beginner trails. Four thousand feet of new snowmaking pipe has been added this season, so making the white stuff won’t be a problem. Youth programs and lesson start at age four and go to 14 years old, and kids ski free with the purchase of an adult season pass. STAY: Pico Resort Hotel and Condominiums offers up to three-bedroom accommodations and is walking distance to Pico. Great for groups, the three-bedroom units can sleep up to 10 with a loft and sofabed, and fireplaces are included in most units. Guests can also access the Pico Fitness Center, featuring an indoor pool and gym, and a free shuttle will take you the five miles down the road to any of Killington’s six mountains. Suicide Six, Pomfret This resort is not only the oldest ski resort in America, it is also home to the first “ski lift,” an improvised rope tow built on Hill No. 6 and powered by a Ford Model T. Now, this quaint and accessible area contains an array of terrain and levels of difficulty. Snowboarders will be thrilled to hit the same slopes that hosted the first National Snow Snurfing competition in 1982, and Alpine skiers will appreciate the 650ft vertical drop, three lifts and 24 different trails, broken down almost evenly between expert, intermediate and beginner. You can also rent fat bikes, try your hand at snowshoeing or strap on a set of cross-country skis. STAY: The Woodstock Inn & Resort is a classic, New England ski resort set in a quaint, unspoiled town – while allowing easy access to the slopes of Suicide Six. After a day in the snow, you can take a stroll on Main Street or hit the 10,000 sq ft spa for a little peace and pampering. The Woodstock Athletic Club is also included in your stay and hosts a variety of activities, like racquetball, yoga, an indoor pool and a gym. A Family First-Run package includes a family group lesson and a s’mores kit for apres ski. Magic Mountain, Londonderry Perched on Glebe Mountain, this ski-forward resort is reminiscent of the Swiss Alps, with twisting, narrow trails which were carved out in the 1960s and are still viable today. Out of the 50 trails, 17 of them are expert, and with a vertical drop of 1500ft, you’ll have access to true rugged, vertical skiing – and a handful of double black diamonds. With a premium on adventure and appreciating the natural beauty of your surroundings, this resort is both laid-back and affordable – and even touts special openings during mid-week snowstorms to access the best natural powder. Want to take some time off skis? Race your pals downhill a totally different way at Tubeyland tube park. STAY: The Upper Pass Lodge is rustic, pet friendly and located at the base of Magic Mountain for an easy commute. A homey resort with personalized service, it consists of just 20 rooms, some of which offer bunkbeds or two bedrooms for families and groups – and one of which comes with an en-suite jacuzzi. Keeping with the local theme, the lodge’s bar features cocktails poured exclusively with Vermont-made spirits.

Inspiration

Take A Bite Out of NYC’s Best Food Halls

New York City’s dining scene has been embracing the concept of the food hall as a recipe for success. These epicurean centers house a mix of eateries as tenants or involve a single culinary theme. Right now, Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens are leading the menu, with food halls to suit many different tastes. Here are some of New York City’s best food halls to see and eat at. City Kitchen Escape the crowds and the corresponding waits at one of the restaurants in this Times Square food mall off the corner of Eighth Avenue and 44th Street. With only seven vendors it might sound small, but this 4000 sq ft venue has enough options for a quick pre- or post-Broadway show meal or a bite before catching your ride home. Dough’s glazed or filled donut creations include cinnamon sugar or lemon poppy flavors, while Ilili Box has pita wraps and other Mediterranean dishes. Gabriela’s Taqueria, Kuro-Obi, Luke’s Lobster, Whitmans New York and Azuki round out the list. A bowl of udon at Industry City © Image courtesy of Industry City Industry City Comprised of repurposed warehouses and factory buildings, this 6 million sq ft, mixed-use complex in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, holds a ton of businesses specializing in fashion, food, fitness, film and architecture. It’s also the headquarters for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team and a retail section known as the Design District. As for dining, Industry City's main food hall is a global cornucopia of cuisines from different parts of the city and the world. Choose from Yaso Tangbao’s Shanghainese street food; Ejen’s Korean comfort food; Table 87, a Brooklyn coal-oven slice pizza shop; Kotti Berliner Doner Kebab (Turkish-German street food); Colson Patisserie’s Belgian pastries; and Li-Lac Chocolates, Manhattan’s oldest chocolatier. There’s also Japan Village, a 20,000 sq ft marketplace with a specialty grocer, an izakaya (traditional Japanese pub), a cocktail bar, and food stations serving traditional Japanese dishes. Turnstyle Underground Market It might sound gross to go to a food hall inside a subway station, but Turnstyle Underground Market, within Manhattan’s Columbus Circle-59th Street Subway Station, is filled with eateries that will foster your appetite. Commuters can grab breakfast, lunch and dinner from 19 food vendors. Hey Hey Canteen serves up Asian fusion fare, while Daa! Dumpling prepares the Russian version of this doughy dish, and Arepa Factory prepares this Latin American corn cake. Access the market through seven street-level entrances; there are shops and pop-up stores too. Inside Essex Market © Image courtesy of Lower East Side Partnership Essex Market With a history dating back to 1888, this Lower East Side institution started as an outdoor pushcart market where vendors hawked everything from hats to herring. As city streets got more hectic, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia created an indoor sales space for them in 1940. Over the decades, as the neighborhood changed and supermarkets rose in popularity, the Essex Market was showing some wear and tear. In May 2019 it re-opened following a 21st-century makeover and a move to a different spot on Essex Street. Occupants include shops from the previous location (fruits and vegetables, meats and cheese providers) along with newcomers. Try Thai fried chicken at Eat Gai, breakfast from Shopsin’s and Middle Eastern food from Samesa. The Pennsy Penn Station has been the subject of mixed feelings over time, but this addition makes it easier to squeeze in a food stop at this major rail-transit hub before a train or a show at neighboring Madison Square Garden. Featuring five chef-driven concepts and a bar with indoor and outdoor dining spaces, diners can order veggie dishes from The Cinnamon Snail and The Little Beet, or go for carnivorous options from the butchery Pat LaFrieda. There's also Neapolitan pizza from Ribalta, rolls and rice bowls from Sabi Sushi and the taqueria and juice bar Taco Dumbo. HK Food Court This 2019 newcomer to Flushing, Queens, provides a taste of Asia with food stalls reflecting the continent’s diverse culinary heritage that compliments the neighborhood’s Asian population. On a former grocery store site, this food hall has Tibetan, Thai, Japanese, Vietnamese, Taiwanese, and regional Chinese cuisine including Henan, Fuzhou, northwest halal and Sichuan food. Order Thai stewed pork from Khao Ka Moo NYC, spicy Tibetan lamb ribs from Khawachen, tom yum soup from Just Noodles and Taiwanese pork belly buns from Hang. Chelsea Market © Image courtesy of Chelsea Market Chelsea Market This food hall in Chelsea has a tasty backstory. The building was once the factory for the National Biscuit Company – better known as Nabisco. It's also where their Oreo Cookie was produced. Becoming an indoor artisan market in 1996, Chelsea Market is spread out, with artisan grocery shops, retail spaces and food stalls along with their Artists & Fleas craft-makers’ area. Good market eats include cheese-stick-makers Big Mozz; the Fat Witch bakery; Jamaican eatery, Tings; and Thai restaurant, Ayada. Nearby, step into Gansevoort Market, another food hall with Asian to American fare. Mercado Little Spain Similar to the all-Italian Eataly in the Flatiron District and World Trade Center, and the French-themed Le District in lower Manhattan’s Brookfield Place, this Spanish-inspired eatery from chefs Jose Andres and brothers Albert and Ferran Adria is inside Manhattan’s Hudson Yards development and has restaurants, bars and kiosks putting the spotlight on Spain’s regional foods. Have a tapas crawl, feast on asador-cooked meats, or simply dine on empanadas and bacalao frito followed by helado for dessert. DeKalb Market Hall Home to 40 food vendors, this Fort Green, Brooklyn, venue features well-recognized NYC restaurant names – it boasts the only Katz’s Deli outpost – alongside up-and-coming business in their own right. Ample Hills Creamery and Arepa Lady have locations here, too. Consider Isan-style grilled chicken over jasmine or sticky rice from Chicks Isan, Fletcher’s barbecue ribs or Home Frite’s sea-salt brined fry varieties. DeKalb Market Hall also has a craft cocktail bar and an events space that hosts regular happy hours and dance parties. The Plaza Food Hall USA On the concourse level of The Plaza New York Hotel, this opulent marketplace is full of fine food purveyors and counter-style dining options, where you can feel a little fancy while having breakfast, lunch and dinner or when taking your order to go. Pick up some high-quality Kusmi Tea or purchase fresh-baked breads and delicate pastries from Boulud’s Épicerie or Pain D’Avignon Bakery. Or get tempted by the colorful macarons made by Ladurée or the richly-layered cakes from Lady M. Savory. Options extend to Pizza Rollio, whose approach to pizza-making is worth tasting, Tartinery, noted for its refined French fare, and Takumi Taco, a popular Mexican brand.

Inspiration

The Best Hotels and Resorts to Spend the Holidays

If you are considering taking the plunge and spending your cherished holiday time somewhere other than home, there are many factors to consider—like how far you want to travel, whether you’re going with family and what, if any, special holiday details are being offered. To help with this difficult determination, we’ve rounded up five super places to consider this holiday season. From sandy beaches to sin city, we’ve got you covered for everything happy and the merry. The Emerson Resort and Spa is a great place to get cozy in upstate New York © Tobey Grumet / Budget Travel Emerson Resort & Spa, Mt. Tremper, NY Location, location, location. Sitting directly between the most sought-after vacation towns in New York’s Catskill mountain range, like Woodstock and Phoenicia, this sprawling resort is just a two-hour drive from NYC, offering a family- and dog-friendly, cold-weather sanctuary from the city. In addition to cold weather pursuits and a weekly bonfire, you can try other included resort activities like a Winter Guided Nature Walk, an ornament making class and Storytime in the Great Room with a delicious hot chocolate bar on hand. The Emerson Resort and Spa is also home to the world’s largest kaleidoscope, and a Holiday Kaleidoshow is being planned for guests. Interested in a little relaxation? Hit the spa and reserve a treatment with its Peppermint Rosemary aroma and signature tea—or get a 20% discount on any manicure through December. The onsite Woodnotes Grille will also be offering holiday-inspired specials, like the Edge of Esopus cocktail and a pan roasted porterhouse pork chop with apple sage butter, roast potatoes and braised red cabbage. Bellagio, Las Vegas, NV Las Vegas has something for everyone when it comes to the holidays. And though you may come for the mild the desert weather, you’ll stay for the shows, restaurants, nightclubs and family activities—including the massive Strip-wide fireworks show on New Year’s Eve. As a home base, the Bellagio is a working winter wonderland you won’t want to miss. In addition to the 42-foot white fir tree with five-car motorized train in its Conservatory & Botanical Gardens, you’ll want to stop and gawk at the polar bear-escorted ice queen, dressed in a couture gown created from preserved roses, silver palmetto leaves, hydrangeas and orchids. Nearby, there is also a Gothic castle and connected passageway inspired by New York’s Central Park. In fact, over 34,000 flowers and 28,000 poinsettias will be on display around the exhibit. Don’t forget to visit restaurants like Spago, New York’s Soho darling Sadelle’s, and the iconic Le Cirque. New Year’s weekend will also herald the opening of The Mayfair Supper Club, a classic dinner and a show experience with the well-known Bellagio fountains dancing in the background. Gaylord Palms Resort, Kissimmee, FL Nobody does family time better than central Florida. And though Disney may be the draw, this Marriot Bonvoy resort is offering holiday fun for all ages. The popular ICE! Exhibit has a Polar Express theme this year and includes hand-carved sculptures and displays made from over two million pounds of ice, while the Cirque Dreams Unwrapped stage show is a combination of a circus and Broadway-style revue. The Gaylord Palms Resort's on-site Alpine Village brings a little bit of cold weather fun to the tropics and the whole family can tube down eight lanes of real snow, while the Santa’s Snow Throw exhibit lets you pound Santa’s Elves with buckets of snowballs. Christmas trees abound in the Evergreen Atrium, a perfect place for a leisurely stroll and the Relache Spa is offering seasonal treatments for adult relaxation. Christmas and New Years buffets are available for brunch and dinner, and kiddos might enjoy the Elf on the Shelf Character breakfast. Christmas packages are now 20% off. The northern lights dance over the Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge, which is located within a UNESCO World Heritage Site © Tobey Grumet / Budget Travel Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge, Alberta, CA Do winter right at this Canadian lodge located directly inside the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Jasper National Park. With 700 acres to explore, activities are diverse and include hiking, sledding, tobogganing, snowshoeing and, of course, skiing. The Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge's Festival of Christmas includes Santa’s Cabin with sleigh and reindeer, and the Winter Wonderland will be set up with all the equipment you’ll need to enjoy the amenities—including fat tire bikes for hire. Hit the Lake Mildred Ice Park, surrounded by Rocky Mountain views, to join a game of hockey, try your hand at figure skating or just tool around the 1km loop. Kids can also check out the indoor Christmas Carnival, decorate their own stockings on Christmas Eve, drop-off letters to Santa and enjoy s’mores under the stars on Lac Beauvert’s frozen shores. Of course, adults can have some fun too by joining a mixology class, beer tasting or cooking demo—all exploring holiday flavors. The Spa & Salon is featuring 24K gold manicures and pedicures for the season as well as an Express Holiday Makeup service if you want to get glam. Best of all, if you’re lucky, you’ll have a chance to catch the stunning aurora borealis over the lake. Half Moon, Montego Bay, Jamaica Enjoy your holidays island style at this festive Jamaican stunner in popular Half Moon. Named for the crescent, white sand beach it cradles, the resort’s open-air lobby and Cedar Bar are the social center of the property—and here you’ll be able to enjoy the “Chrismus breeze,” clink festive cocktails and dance to the seasonal, live music and tribute concerts. A curated Christmas program also includes a tree-lighting ceremony, ice-sculpting lessons and a holiday-themed sandcastle building competition—created specially for bragging rights. Of course, Jamaican Santa doesn’t deign to come by sleigh, so kids can catch him as he flies into Half Moon by parasail. Book a villa in the Rose Hall section of the resort and you can organize a floating feast in your private pool, and have staff customize your decorations and lights. Other family friendly activities include goat races and pony rides, and you can use golf carts or bikes to get around the resort’s 400 acres. Golf and tennis are complimentary, and the Fern Tree Spa is offering a free body exfoliation when you book the therapeutic massage. A Gentleman’s Spa is also available for that guy who has everything.

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