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Flight Delayed? Here Are 7 Things You Should Do Immediately

By Daniel Bortz
January 12, 2022
Delayed Flight
kolapatha saengbanchong | Dreamstime.com
A delayed flight can derail travel plans, but there are a few things you can do to minimize the impact on your holiday.

Finding out your flight has been delayed can feel like the travel gods have conspired against you, and all the sudden you’re stuck feeling helpless.

Well, don’t panic! There are some steps you can take to minimize the pain if you act quickly. Here’s how to get your travel plans back on track the next time you encounter a delayed flight.

Find out why the flight is delayed

Flights get delayed for a variety of reasons. So start by contacting your airline (by talking to a representative at the check-in desk, or by phone if you haven’t arrived at the airport yet) to find out why you won’t be departing on time. By federal law, major US airlines must report the causes of flight delays. According to the US Department of Transportation, there are five types of flight delays:

  • Air Carrier. The delay was due to circumstances within the airline's control, such as maintenance or crew problems, aircraft cleaning, baggage loading, or fueling.
  • Extreme Weather. Tornadoes, blizzards, hurricanes, or other inclement weather can cause flight delays if the airline deems it’s unsafe to fly.
  • National Aviation System (NAS). These delays, which are issued by the national aviation system, include non-extreme weather conditions, airport operations, heavy traffic volume, and air traffic control.
  • Late-arriving aircraft. A previous flight with the same aircraft is running behind.
  • Security. Such delays are a result of evacuation of a terminal or concourse, re-boarding of an aircraft because of security breach, inoperative screening equipment, and long lines in excess of 29 minutes at screening areas.

Although there are no federal laws requiring airlines to provide passengers with money or other compensation when their flights are delayed, knowing what the cause is can help you act accordingly. For example, if your flight is running behind because the plane is being refueled, you can probably expect a short delay – but if there’s a tornado in the forecast you may be in for a longer wait or even a canceled flight.

Tap your smartphone

Download your airline’s mobile app if you haven’t done so already. You can use it to check departure statuses, and some apps let you change itineraries without having to speak to an agent in person or by phone, which can save you a lot of time.

Also download AirHelp – it’s an app that allows you to check if you’re eligible to receive compensation for a delay or cancellation.

Check your connecting flight’s status

This one might be obvious, but it’s still a crucial step. If you’re trying to catch a connecting flight, you’ll want to find out what that flight’s status is. In some cases, your airline may have to put you on a different route in order to get you to reach your final destination.

See if your credit card provides trip interruption insurance

If your flight is delayed more than 12 hours or requires an overnight stay at a hotel, your credit card company may reimburse you for expenses, such as meals and lodging, if the airline doesn’t cover the costs. For instance, the Chase Sapphire Preferred card covers you and your family for up to $500 per ticket of certain non-reimbursed expenses, including meals, lodging, and toiletries, as long as your flight is not delayed in your city of residence. (Of course, you must have paid for your plane ticket with the credit card.)

Lodge a complaint on social media

If your flight isn’t the only one that’s been delayed – which often happens when there are extreme weather conditions – your airline’s phone line and airport staff can get overwhelmed. The upshot: you may be able to get a faster response if you file a complaint on Facebook or Twitter. To increase your exposure – and, in turn, improve your chances of getting a response quickly – weave appropriate hashtags into your post, and see what’s trending: If a lot of other flyers are tweeting #JetBlueFail, for instance, follow their lead.

Stay calm and collected

Taking a friendly, composed approach can go a long way when you speak to any customer service agent, but it’s especially important when dealing with airline representatives. If you throw a tantrum, the agent will be less inclined to offer you a hotel or meal voucher. Also, remember: it’s not the person’s fault your flight has been delayed. So take an even tone, avoid using foul language, and refrain from making personal attacks. (“Why are you so bad at your job?”)

Find fun ways to kill time

Sure, no one likes being stuck at an airport, but you don’t need to sit around and wallow in your self-pity. Many airports, both in the US and abroad, offer a wide array of activities and exceptional food. For example, Chicago O'Hare International Airport offers an interactive play area for kids that features child-sized model airplanes and a control tower. Meanwhile, art lovers can enjoy the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport's permanent exhibit, “Zimbabwe Sculpture: a Tradition in Stone,” which features 20 stone sculptures from the South African country.

Facing a long delay? Go out and do some sightseeing. Just make sure you’re back at the airport with ample time to go through security; after all, the last thing you want to do is miss your flight and then have to wait even longer to get to wherever it is you’re going.

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Travel Tips

The Best U.S. Airports for Long Layovers

Delay-inducing factors hit hard during the holidays. More travelers means slow-going through lines and security checkpoints, and icy winter weather can pile on wait times and cancellations. All that adds up to unplanned hours in unfamiliar airports. If you’re going to encounter a long layover this travel season, where are the best places to get stuck? We looked at airport amenities from coast to coast to find the best U.S. airports for layovers. Austin-Bergstrom International Austin counts some 2,000 bands and performers who make their homes in this musical city. Each week, 27 acts play the Austin airport – it may not be a glamorous gig for the musicians, but it’s certainly a boon to passengers. You can see free live music several times a week at Saxon Pub, Annie’s Café and Bar, Tacodeli, Haymaker, and Hut’s while waiting for your flight. Chicago O’Hare Chicago O’Hare has more than three times the delays as Midway, across town. So this airport’s amenities really come in handy. ORD is well known for an extensive public art collection, which offers visual appeal for airport wanderers. Head to Terminal 1, Concourse B to see a model of a Brachiosaurus skeleton, and don’t miss ‘The Sky’s the Limit,’ a 745-foot-long kinetic light sculpture, in Terminal 1 between Concourses B and C. When traveling, it can be difficult to know whether to leave the airport or get comfortable for a long wait. With the first aeroponic garden at any airport in the world, passengers can at least feel like they’re outside. Head to the mezzanine level of the O’Hare Rotunda Building to see the greenery, get a little fresh air, and enjoy a meal. O’Hare’s restaurants use some of the vegetables and herbs grown in the garden, so your meal may even count as farm-to-table dining. Dallas Fort/Worth International Airport Dallas has all the standard amenities of larger airports – a yoga studio and showers, for example – but you don’t have to head to the in-airport-hotel to catch a rest. Travelers can rent sleeping suites by the hour. Budget-minded travelers can head to free relaxation zones to enjoy ambient lighting, lounge seating, and charging stations. But passengers can also get a gaming-induced adrenaline high at two Gameway entertainment lounges. Each lounge has 36 gaming stations complete with a leather chair, an Xbox One loaded with games, a 43-inch TV, and noise cancelling headphones. Denver International Airport This Rocky Mountain city makes sure passengers love the winter, even when it’s causing them travel delays. The airport installs a free ice-skating rink between the terminal and the Westin hotel each winter; the ice rink is up from roughly the end of November though late January. In other seasons, this plaza has hosted a pop-up park filled with trees native to Colorado, and a beer garden. The Denver airport also has a unique twist to its therapy dog squad: It includes a hundred dogs and one cat, all of which are led around the terminal to ease travelers’ tension. Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport In this snowy part of the country, weather delays are inevitable. The Detroit airport has free WiFi, 24-hour restaurants, and a reflection room to ease frazzled passengers’ stress. It’s also a good place to take a stroll: A 700-foot tunnel connects Concourse B/C with Concourse A and the McNamara Terminal. It’s home to an LED light display that feels like you’re living in a kaleidoscope. San Francisco International Airport San Francisco’s airport has so many traveler amenities, it almost feels like a hotel: free WiFi, luggage storage, (paid) showers, plenty of charging stations, a yoga studio with loaner mats, and a 24-hour children’s play area. To entertain the kiddos, there’s an aviation museum within the airport, and a self-guided educational tour. The friendly canine “Wag Brigade” roams the airport bringing cheer to passengers, but LiLou, the therapy pig, seriously ups the adorable ante. Minneapolis St. Paul Airport At MSP airport travelers can get in their steps with a 1.5-mile walking path around the airport’s perimeter. If travelers want to get out of the airport for a while, Minneapolis’s Mall of America is just a three-stop ride on light-rail transit from the airport. Hundreds of stores, a movie theater, and the Nickelodeon Theme Park are all just 12 minutes away. Pittsburgh International Airport This airport overflows with artwork from local, regional, national, and international artists. Changing exhibitions keep the visuals fresh, so travelers might see new works each time they fly out or return home. Pittsburgh also joined San Diego and Tampa International Airports by hosting a National Endowment for the Arts–funded artist in residence program. If travelers want to get in on the action, they can head to Paint Monkey, a do-it-yourself paint studio, where they can paint a canvas bag to tuck inside their carry on before their flight.

Travel Tips

Everything You'll Need for a Comfortable, First-time Camping Trip

Insert linkCamping will open up your world to a new side of adventure travel. Forget your worries, pitch a tent and enjoy nature. Here’s a guide to the gear you’ll need for your first camping trip and a few camping hot spots around the country. You may have to alter this packing list depending on whether you’re camping at a campsite, “glamping” or going totally off the grid in the middle of the woods. Campsite & Sleeping Preparing your campsite and sleeping arrangements is the most important part of planning for your camping trip. It’s how you’ll be protected from the elements, mosquitos and any other wildlife. This Dagger Tent is a good option for novice campers; it dries quickly, has two doors, and can fit up to three people. You’ll also want to think about what kind of sleeping bag you’ll need for the temperature you’re camping in (Alaska vs. Florida have drastic differences in temperature). You can find this information on the label when you’re shopping. Sleeping pads that go under your sleeping bag will keep you comfortable and ensure a good night’s sleep. Pillows and blankets are also optional items. Or maybe just a poncho that doubles as a blanket, like this one? Consider bringing a camping chair since you’ll be on your feet all day. Find a chair made out of a lightweight material for quick drying. Also, bring a simple tarp and rope are a great way to create an enclosure for cooking in case it rains. You can buy a tarp that keeps the sun, rain and bugs away too. Gear & Gadgets When you’re camping you can run into basically any scenario. That’s why the boy scout motto is about always being prepared. The gear you bring on your first camping trip is what’s going to make your trip go smoothly. While you don’t have to pack the kitchen sink, here are some basics you’re going to want to pack on your first camping trip. The Osprey backpack is lightweight and has a compartment for all of your gear. For lighting, using a headlamp can be convenient or the myCharge Power Lumens is a portable charger that doubles as a bright LED light. They also have a solar charger for when you need to recharge, but are nowhere near an electrical outlet. A simple knife is always handy or you can go all out and bring a Leatherman tool that encompasses a firestarter, hammer, one-handed blade and an emergency whistle. Shoes & Apparel Your clothing and shoes should go along with the idea of being prepared for anything. Blundstone has hiking boots that will last you for years, taking you up mountains and through creeks. While Keen and Bogs also have awesome footwear for camping, like work boots and water shoes that you can wear in rocky waters or beaches. United by Blue is an apparel brand that was specifically made for camping with clothing to keep you warm in the winter with flannels and cool in the summer with lightweight garb. For every product purchased, the brand removes one pound of trash, making it a brand you want to support. Another tip is to take care of your feet and bring extra socks; Smartwool has socks that are made for hiking in all seasons. Cooking, Eating, and Hygiene On your first camping trip, you’ll want to bring a lightweight stove to cook a hot meal. Unless you plan on cooking a classic hot dog dinner followed by s’mores over the campfire. In that case you’ll need to bring matches and a hand ax or saw to gather firewood. But if not, pick a stove that can accommodate what you’re cooking and the type of fuel you prefer (coal or fuel). Or try out this camp stove that turns fire into electricity. It can cook your meals and charge your gear, all at the same time. Pretty amazing, huh? Depending on what you’re cooking up you’ll need a cooler for perishables, cookware, a coffee pot (a warm cup of joe in the morning is worth carrying the extra weight) and a water bottle. This kit can be used as a food container, bowl and vessel to heat food up in. If your campsite has water you don’t need to worry about bringing a water jug or purifier, but if you’re camping more “Naked and Afraid” style, than think about where you’ll be getting your water supply. Also, if you’re going to bear country you should confirm if your campsite has a lockbox for food items or bring a secure container to keep the bears away! They are a lot of prepared food for campers, so if you want to keep it simple, this may be a good choice for you. Good To Go offers meal options cooked up by a chef. Kale and white bean stew anyone? While Taos Bakes and OHi Bar have energy bars when you need an emergency snack. Hey, camping can be exhausting. Most campsites have showers and bathrooms, but definitely check this out first. Then you plan for what you’ll need to bring. Some basics to bring either way include a quick drying camp towel, insect repellent, hand sanitizer and a first aid kit, . Destinations Now that you have a list of equipment, here comes the fun part. Planning where you’re going to camp! While you can’t go wrong with any of the National Parks across the US, consider these lesser known campsites for your first journey. Hither Hills State Park; Montauk New York Hither Hills State Park has 1,700 acres set in the hills of the Hamptons, offering visitors breath-taking views of the beach from the campground (sounds chic?). Allowing campers to go fishing (saltwater and freshwater), swimming and you can even try your hand at surfing at Ditch Plains Beach in Montauk. While hiking the "walking dunes" of Napeague Harbor on the eastern boundary of the park is another popular activity in the area. Be careful to stay on the trails because the ticks thrive in this area. The campsite offers space for 168 tents and trailers and has showers, a store, playground and horseshoes. The fee starts at $35 a night per tent and $70 if you’re not a New York resident. Castle Rock State Park; Almo Idaho The challenging landscape of Castle Rocks State Park attracts rock climbers from around the world. There is also excellent hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding against a dramatic backdrop that dates back 2.5 million years. Enjoy a stay at the park’s campgrounds, yurts or the century-old ranch house. Camping is year round and a standard campsite costs about $20-$27. The weather gets up to the low-90s in summer; cooling to the 50s at night and high-30s in the winter and teens at night, so prepare your sleeping bag arrangements accordingly! Garner State Park; Concan, Texas There are few places as beautiful as Garner State Park AKA the Texas Hill Country River Region for a family looking to go on their first camping trip. The park is open year round and offers just about every outdoor activity you can imagine from hiking and biking to boating and fishing. At night, campers can sleep under the stars in one of the only places in the United States where you can still see the Milky Way! Overnight visitors can stay in screened shelters, cabins or campsites for $15-$35 per night. Among the basic amenities, you can expect to find concessions, a seasonal grocery store, hot showers and restrooms. Camping Deals: For great camping deals be sure to check out our partner Campspot. Campspot is the only online booking platform that lets you research, discover, and instantly reserve the best camping stays at the lowest prices from premiere campgrounds across North America. They give campers more control of their trips by offering more options to choose from and an easier way to book. They are experts in the outdoor industry, so they know what campers and campgrounds care about and use technology to better serve them both.

Travel Tips

10 Best U.S. Airports for Local Food

Local food isn’t just a culinary trend in hipster hubs. It’s catching on in airports, too. That’s good news for travelers. You can forgo that chain fast food order for tastes of a city’s best restaurants, specialty dishes, and local food during a layover. Here are some of the best places to have a unique dining experience before catching your connection. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport Some of the Valley of the Sun’s favorite restaurants have landed at Phoenix Sky Harbor. Top brunch joint Matt’s Big Breakfast (try the waffles with sweet cream butter) has a legendary status in town, as does Iron Chef winner Mark Tarbell, the founder of airport restaurant The Tavern. To appease a sweet tooth, head to Tammie Coe Cakes, for cupcakes or big cookies, or Sweet Republic, for handcrafted ice cream in flavors such as salted butter caramel swirl. If you only have time for a quick craft beer, SanTan Brewing Company and Four Peaks Brewery have local suds on tap. Austin-Bergstrom International Austin is a downhome food town, and its airport is no different. Tap into the town’s food truck vibe with a burger from Hut’s Hamburgers or a bahn-mi taco from The Peached Tortilla. Salt Lick Barbecue is a Hill Country-import with barbecue-sauce slathered smoked meats, sandwiches, and baked potatoes. Plus, you can grab some packaged brisket to take home with you. Austin institution Amy’s Ice Creams also scoops artisan ice cream in flavors like Mexican vanilla. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Travelers can follow a Texas barbecue trail without even leaving the airport. Hop from Fort Worth classic Cousin’s BBQ or Cousin’s Back Porch, to Dickey’s Barbecue Pit (the chain is based in Dallas), and The Salt Lick. Then diners can balance all that Tex with a fair share of Mex at restaurants such as Pappasito’s Cantina. Los Angeles International Airport This airport is a Hollywood gateway, so it’s no surprise the airport’s home to a few star chefs’ restaurants. For example, Top Chef winner Michael Voltaggio is the mastermind behind ink.sack, a gourmet sandwich shop. At Homeboy Bakery, diners eat local and give back to Los Angeles. The bakery is a social enterprise of Homeboy Industries, which serves formerly gang-involved men and women, and, at the bakery, trains them with job skills. Travelers can also get a local-food fix at the Original Farmers Market. After 80 years, the LA institution opened an airport locale to serve meals, snacks, and sweets straight from the market’s restaurants and stalls. John F. Kennedy International Airport Manhattan is a playground for internationally known chefs – and many have opened airport restaurants. New York City local Andrew Carmellini opened sandwich-centric Croque Madame. Top Chef Masters’ champion and James Beard Foundation award-winning chef Marcus Samuelsson founded Uptown Brasserie, serving international cuisine in a brasserie environment. Shake Shack may be a national chain now, but it started in New York City, so travelers can get their burger hit and feel like they’re eating local all in one bite. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta is the busiest international airport in the world, so travelers are likely to make their way through here at some point – or often. In Atlanta, eating at Chick-fil-A counts as eating local – the chain was founded in there – but there’s much more than chicken sandwiches and waffle fries. The first upscale restaurant at the airport, One Flew South serves global fare, while Paschal’s, a more than sixty-year-old spot, doubles down on soul food. Nashville International Airport Tourists can get in on the late-night-recording-session vibe with Nashville-born 8th & Roast Coffee Co. Burritos may not be the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of Tennessee, but Blue Coast Burrito has spread its tortilla wings across the state and has an airport setup. Music City isn’t short on beer, either. Grab a craft draft at Yazoo Brewery kiosk, Tennessee Brew Works, and Fat Bottom Brewing. Swett’s serves a classic Southern lunch—don’t miss the pecan pie. Denver International Airport Denver’s all about brews and big-time meats. Head to Denver ChopHouse & Brewery for craft beer from Denver-based Rock Bottom Brewery Co. and a menu that includes filet mignon and bison burgers. Elway’s, owned by local icon and former Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway, also serves hand-cut steaks. For lighter fare, head to Mile High City favorite Root Down, which specializes in healthy, gluten-free, and vegetarian dishes. Portland International Airport All hail the hipster gods, who have brought droves of local food to Portlandia’s airport. Travelers can get their caffeine fixes at local institution Stumptown Coffee Roasters. Eating a donut is practically required in Portland, and passengers can find versions from Portland’s second most famous shop, Blue Star Donuts at PDX. Laurelwood Public House & Brewery serves handcrafted beers and solid pub grub, like fish and chips. Food Carts PDX keeps things lively with a rotating lineup of local food trucks, which serve breakfast and lunch. Previous carts have served Cuban food, waffles, and Asian-fusion fare. San Francisco International Airport San Franciscans were going green and serving local before it was popular, and its airport restaurants reflect that tradition. Burger Joint has been plating humanely and sustainably raised meats on family farms and ranches since 1994, and it continues to do now inside the airport. The Plant Café also serves local, organic food, and sustainable seafood. On the run? Duck into Napa Farms Market, a marketplace that reflects northern California’s agricultural bounty with grab-and-go sandwiches and baked goods.

Travel Tips

Bargain trips between Thanksgiving and Christmas 2019

Can you keep a secret? The weeks between the busy Thanksgiving and Christmas/New Year’s holidays can hold bargains for travelers who are willing and able to sneak away for an early-December “mini shoulder season.” Everybody knows Thanksgiving week is one of the busiest periods of the year, with more than 50 million Americans on the move and airfares and hotel rates typically rising. Likewise, as you get closer to Christmas Eve, the more you can expect to pay for airline seats and hotel beds. But what is not commonly understood is the sweet spot in between those holidays (roughly from late November through Dec. 20 or so) brings opportunities for savings as theme parks, hotel chains, and airlines see a big drop in demand and seek to entice travelers with good deals. Here are some of the most alluring places to consider. Disney Devotees of Walt Disney World, in Orlando, FL, who have made multiple park visits consistently report early December is one of the most magical times to enjoy iconic attractions like Space Mountain, Fantasyland, and the new Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge. Holiday decorations and events abound, including Mickey’s Very Merry Christmas Party, Minnie’s Wonderful Christmastime Fireworks Show, and Epcot’s International Festival of the Holidays and Candlelight Procession. And select Disney Resort hotels such as Animal Kingdom Lodge, BoardWalk Inn, and the Grand Floridian Resort & Spa offer up to 20 percent savings on bookings right up to December 24, when the crowds return and room rates rise. (Learn more at disneyworld.disney.go.com). If you’re considering a trip to Disneyland, in Anaheim, CA, for its holiday festivities, aim for the weeks of December 9th and 16th for lower rates at popular on-site hotels such as the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa and the Disneyland Hotel. (Learn more at disneyland.disney.go.com) Universal Studios Travelers can enjoy immersive lands devoted to the Simpsons, Jurassic Park, Harry Potter, and more, plus get a head start on holiday celebrations minus the hordes by booking a stay at Universal Orlando Resort in early-to-mid-December. You’ll enjoy the Christmas decorations and events at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, Universal’s legendary Holiday Parade, and a live retelling of Dr. Seuss’s The Grinch in the ‘Grinchmas Who-liday Spectacular.’ Hotel bargains are available for stays until December 19, including rates starting at $120/night for a four-night stay at Universal’s Cabana Bay Beach Resort, including early park-entry privileges each morning. (Learn more at universalorlando.com) A visit to Universal Studios Hollywood, in Universal City, CA, in early-to-mid-December offers similar attractions and holiday-themed events and reduced crowds, with nearby partner hotels offering reasonable packages that include room and park entrance starting around $190 per person; prices start to tick upward as you get closer to the weekend of December 20. (Learn more at universalstudioshollywood.com) Warm Beach Getaways Sure, most travelers dream of escaping the cold weather in January and February. But the “mini shoulder season” between Thanksgiving and Christmas is an ideal time to plant yourself on a warm white-sand beach at major savings. From the South Pacific to the Caribbean, warm-weather beach communities regard early-to-mid-December as a time to lure bargain-seekers. Hawaii hotels and resorts are known for offering nice post-Thanksgiving deals such as complimentary nights added to your stay; the Big Island, home to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, consistently offers the best hotel rates among the Hawaiian islands. South Florida and the Caribbean have said “buh-bye” to hurricane season and offer buy-one-get-one-free stays (which can often be even more generous than that – research deals online, then follow up with a direct call to the property and ask, politely, if they can offer you even more). European River Cruises Now is the time to research and book a 2020 December river cruise through some of Europe’s legendary Christmas celebrations and public markets. Follow cruise lines such as Viking River Cruises and Avalon Waterways on social media and sign up for alerts so you can jump on good deals, which are typically offered up to a year in advance (when cruise lines are especially eager to fill staterooms for the coming year). For the best possible taste of Europe’s Christmas markets, with their handmade crafts, elaborately decorated baked goods, and endless old-world charm, choose a cruise that will visit Central European cities like Vienna and Budapest. Note: While it’s theoretically possible to grab a last-minute deal on a 2019 Christmas markets river cruise, it is unlikely at this late date. (Learn more at vikingrivercruises.com and avalongwaterways.com) Québec City, Canada Can’t afford a trip to Paris? Opt instead to stroll the charming winding streets of Québec City, along the St. Lawrence River, where you can practice your French language skills, try an array of authentic local cuisine (including the ultimate “gravy fries,” poutine), and sip great wine. While Québec draws visitors from all over the world as the New Year arrives with its winter festival and ice sculptures (and the ice hotel, opening January 2), early December is a great time to get a taste of all the city offers before the crowds arrive. (Learn more at quebec-cite.com)