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    Tarrytown,

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    Featured in Budget Travel's Cool Small Towns 2022

    A trip to Tarrytown offers visitors the perfect complement of history, dining, shopping and nature -- not to mention entertainment and first class lodging. From the majestic Hudson River views, including the Tappan Zee Bridge, to its Historic Districts showcasing 19th and 20th century architecture to its many unique shops and fine restaurants and hotels, Tarrytown offers something for everyone.

    It was in Tarrytown that America's first recognized author,Washington Irving, made his home, Sunnyside, which is open to the public for tours and special events. One of the country's oldest operating theaters, Tarrytown's historic Music Hall offers a wide variety of entertainment.

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    Budget Travel Lists

    Tarrytown, New York - Coolest Small Towns 2022

    On the shores of New York’s Hudson River, just 16 miles from the Bronx border, Tarrytown combines history, natural beauty, and a range of small businesses that make for a truly unique small-town experience. Margo Timmins, lead singer of the alt-country band Cowboy Junkies, recently announced from the stage of the Tarrytown Music Hall that the venue, on the town’s scenic Main Street, is one of her favorite places to perform because there is a great coffeehouse on one side and the yarn shop on the other. That would be Coffee Labs, purveyors of exquisite artisanal java (there will be a line, possibly out the door, but it’s worth the wait), and Flying Fingers, a favorite of Martha Stewart’s, boasting a giant sheep sculpture adorned with brightly colored yarn right outside the front door. You could spend your entire day combing Main Street for world cuisine — Lefteris’s Greek fare and Tarry Tavern’s upscale comfort food are just two wildly popular examples — or galleries, thrift shops, and musical instruments. But set aside some time to explore beautiful historic sites such as Sunnyside (once home to Washington Irving, the first man of American letters and the author of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle) and Lyndhurst (a 19th century mansion whose riverside grounds now play host to craft fairs, kennel shows, and jazz concerts). No visit to this region is complete without traversing RiverWalk, a scenic trail through the woods along the eastern shore of the Hudson, and the many winding trails in Rockefeller State Park and Preserve. More about Tarrytown Tarrytown, NY A trip to Tarrytown offers visitors the perfect complement of history, dining, shopping and nature -- not to mention entertainment and first class lodging. Keep Reading... Meet Budget Travel’s Coolest Small Towns for 2022: Content presented by Have Fun Do Good Have Fun Do Good (HFDG) is on a mission to provide adventure seekers with a unique experience that allows them to travel while giving back to the community through volunteering. Learn more at https://havefundogood.co/

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    Inspiration

    How to safely celebrate Halloween in the US this year

    Let’s face it, Halloween is going to be different this year. Because of the pandemic, the CDC recommends skipping trick-or-treating and in-person parties in favor of lower-risk activities like carving and decorating pumpkins with your family or having virtual costume contests with friends. If you’re willing to wear a mask and stay at least six feet from others, moderate-risk activities like outdoor costume parties and visits to pumpkin patches are fine, but indoor costume parties and traditional haunted houses are now considered to be higher-risk. While theme park favorites like Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios and Mickey’s Not-So-Scary Halloween Party at Walt Disney World have been cancelled—die-hards can still attend socially distanced Halloween-themed events at Hersheypark, Dollywood, Busch Gardens Williamsburg, Busch Gardens Tampa Bay and select Six Flags theme parks as long as they book tickets ahead of time, wear a mask and have their temperatures checked upon entry—communities around the country have been forced to get creative and figure out fun ways to keep the spirit of Halloween alive this year. Here’s how you can still celebrate safely. Salem, Massachusetts While Salem is best known for its witch trials of the late-1600s, it’s also a hot spot for all things Halloween. This year, however, Salem will be closed the last weekend of October and its Haunted Happenings events are moving online. Visit the Virtual Haunted Happenings Marketplace to see and buy creative wares from local artists, tour a historic home on a virtual house tour and tune in to see who wins the Halloween at Home Costume Contest. Hudson Valley, New York While most of Sleepy Hollow’s Halloween events have been cancelled due to the pandemic, some, like the All Shorts Irvington Film Festival and Tarrytown Music Hall’s Harvest Hunt and Virtual Ghost Tour are moving online this year. Sleepy Hollow Cemetery Walking Tours and a few other in-person events are also being held with Covid-19 restrictions in place, though you’ll need to book tickets online since no last-minute walk-ins will be allowed in this year. Nearby in Croton-on-Hudson, don’t miss The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze at Van Cortlandt Manor, happening now through November 1, then Nov. 6-8, 13-15 and 20-22. Tickets must be purchased ahead of time online and mask wearing and social distancing are required. Long Island, New York In Old Bethpage, you’ll find the second location of The Great Pumpkin Blaze, operating at limited capacity now through November 1, then Nov. 4-8. In Yaphank, fans of drive-thru haunted houses can brave The Forgotten Road in Southaven County Park. Purchase tickets and download the audio tracks before you go, then play them as you drive up to each of the marked signs in this immersive 30-minute Halloween experience. Washington, D.C. From ghost tours and scary drive-in movies to pumpkin-centric celebrations and Halloween happy hours, there are plenty of ways to celebrate safely in the capitol this year. Yorktown and Norfolk, Virginia For a real treat, head to the Paws at the River Market pet costume parade at 1 p.m. on Oct. 31, part of Yorktown Market Days. Nearby in Norfolk, it’s Halloween at the Chrysler Museum of Art, where staff members dress up as their favorite works of art and kids can create their own glass-blown pumpkins (timed tickets are available online). Spooky virtual tours are also happening via Facebook Live at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Oct. 31, as is a virtual Mystery at the Museum Zoom event starting at 7 p.m. Savannah and Atlanta, Georgia The Savannah Children’s Museum is hosting “Tricks, Treats, and Trains,” at the Georgia State Railroad Museum. The Children’s Museum of Atlanta also has a number of Halloween themed activities happening from October 24–31, like a costumed dance party, spooky exhibits about spiders in The Science Bar and Halloween themed arts and crafts in the Creativity Cafe. Tickets must be booked in advance and all children ages five and up are required to wear a mask. New Orleans, Louisiana Pick up a pumpkin from Lafreniere Pumpkin Patch, dress up for the Jefferson Community Band Halloween Concert on October 29, watch Ghostbusters from your car at the Pontchartrain Center, and visit the New Orleans Nightmare Haunted House, among other themed events this year in Jefferson Parish. Chattanooga, Tennessee This year, Chattanooga Ghost Tours is running its Murder & Mayhem Haunted History Tour as well as a neighborhood Halloween decorating contest, listing the most spirited houses on its website so people can check them out from their cars. Louisville, Kentucky Don’t miss the Jack O’Lantern Spectacular drive-thru experience at Iroquois Park, happening now through Nov. 1 from dusk until 11 p.m. on weeknights and midnight on Friday and Saturday. Be aware that there may be up to a 2.5-hour wait, so bring along your favorite Halloween movie to watch in the car until it’s your turn to go through. Miami, Florida Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables is hosting a special Yappy Hour and pet costume parade on Oct. 29 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Both humans and their dressed up fur babies will receive complimentary snacks during the ticketed event. Over in Miami Beach, restaurants along historic Española Way are offering Halloween night specials on food and cocktails, making it a great spot to grab some outdoor grub. Chicago, Illinois Chicago’s popular Crypt Run is a virtual 5K this year, so sign up through the website and run it on your own terms. This year’s iteration of the Music Box Theatre’s annual scary movie marathon will take place at the Chi-Town Movies Drive-In through Oct. 31. Fans of The Shining will love Room 237, an interactive pop-up experience and lounge at Morgan Manufacturing. You’ll be a guest at the Overlook Hotel, with its giant hedge maze, Gold Room cocktail bar, photo-ops based on movie scenes and specially themed drinks like “Redrum” and “Come Play With Us.” Hocus Pocus fans should stop by the “I Put A Spell On You” pop-up bar and kitchen at Homestead On The Roof now through Nov. 8, where you can taste cocktails and dishes inspired by the film. St. Louis, Missouri Celebrate Halloween at Union Station now through Oct. 31, by wearing your favorite costume, spending 30-45 minutes walking through the tent maze and four historic train cars—all decked out in spooky decorations featuring witches, skeletons and other creepy creatures—and taking home some candy and a pumpkin to decorate. Book your tickets ahead of time online, where there’s also an option to add a scenic ride on the St. Louis Wheel. San Diego, California Mostra Coffee is hosting Movie Nights Under the Stars, where you can catch a showing of Casper or Coco on Oct. 29 or Oct. 30, enjoy dinner and dessert, and win a $50 cash prize in the costume contest. Each adult ticket comes with a Mostra beverage, while each children’s ticket comes with a trick-or-treat bag full of candy. Those with little ones should check out Gyminny’s Spooky Drive-Thru, where you can safely catch a circus show, dress up in your favorite costumes, and get some goodie bags from your car.

    Road Trips

    5 fall foliage road trips through New York State

    So now, it’s a good time to jump on a road trip. Here are our suggested itineraries for a four-day road trip throughout upstate New York. However, read up on CDC and statewide COVID-19 mandates before heading out. For reference, I Love New York, the state’s tourism board, puts out a weekly fall foliage map report on their website. Chasm (Little Grand Canyon of East), New York. ©ujjwalstha/ShutterstockRoad trip 1: The Adirondacks Where to Stop: Lake Placid tells about the 1980 Winter Games with present-day restaurants and attractions and is close to the High Peaks Wilderness. Its challenging 46 Peaks will reward you with sweeping foliage views. Eight miles from Lake Placid, Saranac Lake has a buzzing downtown with shops, galleries and restaurants, or see Saranac Lake 6ers, a close-by collection of six beautiful peaks. Or jaunt along the scenic route to Tupper Lake and to the Wild Center, whose Wild Wild platformed trail heads across the treetops. The Tawahus Road leads to the Upper Works Trailhead, which provides an alternative route to traditional northern or eastern access to the High Peaks Wilderness. Trails at the Crown Point State Historic Site, on the shores of Lake Champlain, lead to two Revolutionary War-era fort ruins. In Bolton Landing, Adirondack Extreme Adventure Course is the largest aerial tree-top adventure park in the U.S. The Lake George area is a premier hiking destination with unparalleled beauty of the Adirondacks. Some hikes, such as The Pinnacle, jaunt along wooded trails with a switchback or two to ease the climbing burden. Where to eat: In Lake Placid, Golden Arrow’s restaurant, Generations, is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with grown and raised locally menu. Up the road from Crown Point State Historic Site, Gunnison's Orchards & Bakery serves up fresh-baked pastries, bread, cookies, pies, and their cinnamon cider donuts. End your day at Ledge Hill Brewery, for handcrafted ales and lagers mindfully brewed in Westport. Road Trip 2: Capital-Saratoga Where to stop: Starting from the Helderberg Hilltowns, John Boyd Thacher State Park in Voorheesville is perched atop the Helderberg Escarpment, with panoramic views of the Hudson-Mohawk valleys and the Adirondack and Green mountains. After hiking along the park’s Indian Ladder Trail, take a nine-minute drive to Indian Ladder Farms in Altamont. Kids can pick apples and pet farm animals and parents can unwind at the cidery and brewery tasting room. Lastly, at Falls View Park, marvel at Cohoes Falls, New York State’s second largest waterfall. Where to eat: Nine Pin Cider, New York's first farm cidery, has a tasting room in Albany’s Warehouse District, with a rotating selection. Find a traditional or a new flavorful spin on the apple cider donut at Cider Belly Doughnuts, in the heart of downtown Albany. Afternoon sun on sunset rock during Autumn, overlooking North-South Lake in the Catskills Mountains of New York. ©lightphoto/Getty Images Road Trip 3: Hudson Valley Where to stop: From New York City, first explore the lower Hudson Valley river towns, beginning in Tarrytown at the Lyndhurst Mansion along the Hudson River. Next, drive north to Garrison to see the Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center, the former home of industrial designer Russel Wright. Then, Dia:Beacon is a contemporary art museum in a Nabisco box-printing factory, whose exterior grounds were designed by artist Robert Irwin. Head to the Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting Poughkeepsie and Highland. From Highland, drive north approximately 25 minutes to Kingston to check out the historic waterfront district. Pumpkin and apple picking can be done at Samascott Farm Orchard and Golden Harvest Farms in nearby Valatie. Where to eat: In Tarrytown, stop by the Sweet Grass Grill for a local and seasonal focused meal. In Kingston, Outdated Café has a range of salads, egg dishes, and more; purchase antiques too. For drinks, hot spots include River Outpost Brewing (Peekskill), Wolf & Warrior (White Plains), Decadent Ales (Mamaroneck), Sing Sing Kill (Ossining) and Captain Lawrence Brewing Company (Elmsford). Road Trip 4: Central New York Where to stop: From the North, the Scenic Byway - Route 20’s scenery offers unique of shopping experiences. Lake Classic Outfitters will fit the bill at Sam Smith’s Boatyard and The Blue Mingo Grill overlooking Otsego Lake. In Cooperstown, find not only the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, but also the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum. Main Street is the visitor hub with baseball-themed shops, eateries and the home of Doubleday Field. Where to eat: Grab a bite to eat and an ice cream with a life-sized Elvis statue at Jerry’s Place just before reaching Cooperstown. Brooks’ House of BBQ is how to fill your belly when traveling from Oneonta in the south, or try a Bohemian-feel, experiential meal at Origins. In Cooperstown, Alex’s Bistro is a local favorite with flavor concoctions unmatched. The Middle Falls At Letchworth State Park In New York. ©Jim Vallee/Shutterstock Road Trip 5: Finger Lakes Where to stop: This trip takes you from Canandaigua along Routes 5 and 20 and down to Naples, home of the grape pie. County Road #12 Scenic Overlook, Kershaw Park and Onanda Park in Canandaigua offer scenic vistas and fresh lake water. In Naples, go to Artizanns for NY made souvenirs and stop by any of the local stands for Grape Pie. In Canandaigua, there’s a cute Main Street with all kinds of shops and a couple of roof top bars. Take a fun farm diversion to go to Lazy Acres Alpacas in Bloomfield. Finger Lakes National Forest, the only national forest in New York State, is located on a ridge between Seneca and Cayuga lakes with over 30 miles of interconnecting trails. They include the 12-mile Interloken Trail, which is part of the Finger Lakes Trail Association network. The Keuka Lake Outlet Trail lies between the villages of Penn Yan and Dresden and measures nearly seven miles of wooded trail and along waterfalls. Where to eat: Ethnic diversity is noticeable in Canandaigua’s restaurant scene or check the craft breweries in the area. In Naples. Monica’s Pies is known for its grape pie and Brew and Brats at Arbor Hill has locally made sausages, pies, wine and beers.

    Road Trips

    Affordable Summer Road Trips: One-Tank Escapes From 9 Cities

    Road trip season is here, and there's no better way to kick off summer than hopping in the car and exploring destinations that are an easy, fun drive away. Here are nine destinations that will pay off big dividends on the less-than-two-hour investment—and one tank of gas—it takes to get there. 1. FROM CHICAGO: INDIANA DUNES, IN The Indiana Dunes sit along a 15 mile stretch of Lake Michigan’s southern shore. It’s only about 35 miles down I-90 from Chicago International Airport, but you’d be forgiven if you thought you were whisked away to the Sahara. Even the pine forests around the dunes sit on sand. Then, of course, the sprawling, shimmering lake will remind you that you are absolutely not in the desert. This destination draws birders in the spring, kayakers and other water sport enthusiasts in the summer, and anglers in the fall. There’s plenty for everyone else to enjoy throughout the 15,000-acre site as well, like tranquil forests, scenic prairies and marshes, a visitor center with a bookstore and junior ranger guides for kids, and 50 miles of trails—many of them quite rugged. And no need to rush back to Chicago at the end of the day. The surrounding area has eateries ranging from a sushi stop to laid-back pubs to a steakhouse, not to mention restaurants focused on seasonal farm-to-table menus. 2. FROM BOSTON: CONCORD, NH About 75 miles north of Boston, a straight shot up I-93, New Hampshire’s state capital offers more than just a hearty helping of outdoor options, like the wooded hiking trails at Audubon McLane Center, and New England history (see: the Pierce Manse, a museum in what was once the home of Franklin Pierce, the 14th president, and the majestic gold-domed state house, which was built in 1819). Fueled in part by urban types relocating here in search of a slower-paced life, a burgeoning dining scene has been taking shape alongside the longstanding institutions. Newell Post, for instance, is a popular breakfast/lunch stop that's been serving familiar dishes with a regional accent since it opened in 2012, and Revival, a locally minded eatery that opened in 2017, has been drawing crowds with its updates on classic New England fare. Concord also has a bigger music scene than most towns its size, with cafes and small venues hosting local indie performances while the Capitol Center for the Arts sees bigger acts. 3. FROM NEW YORK CITY: TARRYTOWN, NY For most travelers, New York City is the final destination, not a pass-through point, but whether you’re visiting the east coast or have lived in one of the five boroughs your whole life, it’s worth packing your bags for a trip to Tarrytown. This veritable country escape is a 30-minute drive from Midtown, just off the New York State Thruway (I-87) at the eastern landing of the Tappan Zee Bridge, or a 38-minute ride on MTA’s Metro-North Railroad, which leaves frequently from Grand Central. Quaint but lively, Tarrytown is a throwback to village life. There are pretty green spaces, a charming Main Street, and picturesque brick buildings that play host to restaurants, ice cream shops, antique stores, and cute boutiques, not to mention the grand, historic Tarrytown Music Hall where you can catch a broad range of local and national acts. If history piques your interest, take note that the town was a thruway on the Underground Railway, a hometown of Washington Irving, and a retreat for the Rockefellers, who built a family estate here in 1913. It’s a terrific place to catch your breath after a few days in the city. 4. FROM TORONTO: PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY (Alisonh29/Dreamstime) Prince Edward County is to Toronto what the Hudson Valley is to New York City, which is to say a super-hip urban escape with a growing number of gorgeous boutique hotels and dynamite creative restaurants, food trucks, and farmers’ markets. That should come as no surprise, given the regions abundant organic farms. With its rural landscape and natural attraction, PEC, about two and a half hours from both Ottawa and Toronto, is a refuge for creative types who expanded the area’s artistic footprint with their shops and galleries. And about those natural attractions: Sandbanks, one of the largest beaches in Ontario, offers swimming, fishing, hiking, sailing, and camping, while the pilgrimage-worth Lake on the Mountain, a provincial park (the Canadian equivalent of a state park), delivers a mind-bending sight, with the freshwater lake stretching out onto a cliff over a bay. And what’s more, it’s a terrific wine region, and the sheer number of vineyards make it a destination in its own right. 5. FROM SEATTLE: VASHON ISLAND, WA When you hear “American island escape,” it’s easy to think of Hawaii or North Carolina’s Outer Banks. The Pacific Northwest, though, is dotted with enchanting little islands—many of which are easy to get to and easy to fall for. The 37-square-miles Vashon Island, the largest in the Puget Sound, is about a 90-minute ferry ride from Fauntleroy Terminal in West Seattle, and the destination (population 10,000) is nothing short of a rural old-world paradise. Thanks to its backwoods roads, stretches of farmland, and protected waters of Quartermaster Harbor, the island is best explored by bike or kayak, both of which you can rent. Many of the small towns along the highway can be loosely described as artist colonies with a hippie vibe. Galleries, cafes, and an array of restaurants proliferate, plus there are seasonal performances, like outdoor concerts and Shakespeare in the Park, and the Vashon Center for the Arts (vashoncenterforthearts.org), a regal performance space and gallery that came with a $20 million price tag when it opened in 2016. Today it’s home to the Vashon Opera, a decade-old company, and host to a variety of local and national acts. With that many options, you’ll likely need more than a weekend. 6. FROM AUSTIN: GEORGETOWN, TX A mere 30 miles north of Austin, Georgetown was once a sleepy bedroom community, but lately it's come into its own, largely because real estate prices and lack of availability have pushed artists, musicians, and other creative types out of what some refer to as the music capital of the world. In the past few years, Georgetown has emerged as a portrait of modern America against a historic backdrop. It was once a stronghold of Western life along the Chisholm Trail, and the town square, a lively gathering place, is also a historic site to behold, with gorgeously preserved Victorian-era buildings. Dining options range from high-end bistros to cheery, creative pizza shops, like 600 Degrees Pizzeria. But what really makes this small town a culinary destination is its wineries, including the Georgetown Winery right in the middle of the town square. For those looking to do extensive vineyard visits, take note: The town is 90 minutes from Hill Country, a thriving wine region that's quite vast, as to be expected in Texas. 7. FROM DENVER: CHEYENNE, WY When it comes to short trips from Denver, we’re casting our vote for crossing state lines and checking out Cheyenne, despite Colorado's many adorable mountain towns. The Wyoming state capital is about 100 miles from Denver International Airport, and to make things easy, there’s a shuttle from the terminal to downtown Cheyenne (greenrideco.com). The city's biggest claim to fame is the annual Cheyenne Frontier Days, a festive pageant-like salute to rodeo and all things Western, but there are plenty of ways to celebrate America's vintage Western spirit here year-round. For starters: check out the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum, the Cowgirl Museum of the West, and more. It's an easy city to explore on foot: The Victorian-style downtown includes a delightful mix of country-chic outfitters, hip boutiques, bookstores, and vintage shops, plus a variety of restaurants, many of which offer noteworthy craft beer selections. 8. FROM LOS ANGELES: PASADENA, CA Los Angeles may have the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, but its neighbor to the east has some sparkle of its own. A little more than ten miles from downtown L.A. via CA-110, Pasadena boasts world-class arts institutions, an array of delicious places to eat and drink, and a picturesque, walkable old-town area, all against a backdrop that looks like something out of a film set—and that’s because it might very well be one. Pasadena is an unsung hero of the movie-making scene, and it’s such a staple that there’s an entire walking tour devoted to filming locations around town. But it’s not all stardust and sequins. Stroll along Old Pasadena’s Colorado Boulevard, where you’ll find big-brand chains and indie boutiques alike; pop into the Norton Simon Museum (nortonsimon.org), where classic works by Picasso and Degas complement modern pieces like massive murals by California native Sam Francis; book a table at one of the city’s 500 restaurants (think green juice and avocado toast at Sage Vegan Bistro and blockbuster northern Italian fare at Union Restaurant); and catch a show or a game at the Rose Bowl before you head back to La-La Land. 9. FROM NASHVILLE: FRANKLIN, TN A 20-mile shot down I-65 from Nashville, Franklin (population 75,000) has serious music-world credentials—enough to hold its own against Music City. This powerhouse town has country and western in its blood: Stars like Wynonna Judd have been known to pop in for the famous open-mic night at Puckett’s Grocery, and country royalty like Alan Jackson and Keith Urban have owned property in the area. With a beautiful 16-block stretch of historically preserved buildings—an array of shops, galleries, and homes—plus a storybook-worthy Main Street, downtown Franklin is Americana incarnate. Main Street is anchored by the landmark Franklin Theatre, a performance and movie venue that's been lovingly restored to its original 1937 glory. Further afield, the quaint hamlet of Leiper’s Fork is a hip one-stop shop for anyone seeking old-school Southern soul. You’ll find it here in antique shops and galleries, eateries dishing out classic regional fare, distilleries producing small-batch whiskies, and local institutions like Finds in the Fork, a paradise for vinyl collectors. Weather permitting, settle in for an alfresco flick at the Leipers Fork Lawnchair Theater. It’s country living at its finest.For travel inspiration, know-how, deals, and more, sign up for Budget Travel's free e-newsletter.

    Inspiration

    New York's Hudson Valley

    Ever since the Dutch patroons settled the green hills that flank the Hudson River in the seventeenth century, aristocrats have been building their dream homes along its scenic banks; today many are open to the public, offering a glimpse into the rarified world of America's early movers and shakers. Built mostly on the eastern bank, they cover every style in the book, from Gothic to Beaux-Arts to Federal; this concentrated wealth of historic architecture, unique in the United States, can easily fill a week's drive or more (especially during its gorgeous fall foliage season), but you can take in the approximately 130-mile stretch from New York City to the town of Hudson in as little as three or four packed days. In New York City, car rental outfits are plentiful; cut rates in half by renting at Newark Airport. Invest in a good regional map and head north on the Henry Hudson Parkway, which leads into the Saw Mill River Parkway and to Tarrytown, the first stop. From there, scenic Route 9 links the rest of the towns, though the Taconic State Parkway may be used when time is short. And you can save bucks as well as time by following a classic itinerary focusing on the historic highlights and patronizing the clusters of economical motels and dining spots where you can eat well for less than $15 a person. Note that most attractions close from approximately November through April, with some opening again briefly in December with romantic holiday candlelight tours; always check when planning your trip. New York City to Tarrytown (25 Miles) Head north out of Manhattan on the Henry Hudson Parkway, past white birch trees and the occasional creek tumbling over mossy boulders, the boxy tenements of the Bronx melting into inviting forests freckled with red-brick and white-clapboard towns. In well under an hour - but light-years away from Manhattan - you make your first stop, the pretty village of Tarrytown. This is Sleepy Hollow country, so don't miss Sunnyside (W. Sunnyside Lane, 914/591-8763), the riverfront homestead of that tale's writer, Washington Irving. This Dutch stone cottage "all made up of gable ends, angles and corners," in Irving's words, makes an excellent spot for a picnic. Adjacent is Lyndhurst (635 S. Broadway, 914/631-4481), a sprawling jumble of towers, rose windows, and steep roofs that's America's finest example of Gothic revival. This 1838 cross between an Arthurian fantasy castle and a setting for a romance novel is dressed in "Sing Sing marble" quarried by inmates from the notorious Ossining prison nearby. The elaborate interior fools our eyes with trompe l'oeil plaster passing for marble, mahogany, and flocking, a technique then much in vogue (and ironically more expensive than the real thing). It's pricey, but you do get a lot of sightseeing bang for those bucks at Kykuit ("KIKE-it," Dutch for "lookout"; 914/631-8200), a wisteria-clad stone mansion built in 1913 for John D. Rockefeller and which housed four generations of his clan before joining the National Trust as a historic site. Approaching on the shuttle from the Kykuit Visitor Center at Philipsburg Manor in Sleepy Hollow, the scale of the grounds is impressive, stretching down to the river and dotted with Governor Nelson Rockefeller's modern sculptures. The gardens, fountains, and vistas are worth the trip in and of themselves, but the house also offers great artworks, furniture, and Oriental porcelain, and there's even a fascinating collection of classic cars in the coach barn.  SleepsSaw Mill River Motel (25 Valley Ave., Elmsford, 914/592-7500, sawrivermotel.com) Just outside Tarrytown, a pleasant, two-story red-brick affair with 127 rooms. Elmsford Motel (19 Tarrytown Rd., 914/592-5300) A more basic but clean and quite presentable 48-roomer. Eats In the small but lively Tarrytown downtown, inexpensive restaurants abound despite the upscale look. Top picks: Bella's Restaurant (5 South Broadway, 914/332-0444) Plain, honest diner-style food in a plain, honest setting; entrées $6.25 to $11.25 with bread, salad, and two sides. Main Street Pizza (47 Main St., 914/631-3300, mainstreetpizzatarrytown.com) The pizza's great, but the dinners ($5.75 to $12, including bread and either pasta or salad) are even better in this sparkling tiled eatery. Tarrytown to Hyde Park (55 Miles) The next morning, pick up Route 9 for the idyllic 25-mile drive to the town of Garrison, where Boscobel (1601 Rte. 9D, 845/265-3638; boscobel.org), a 12-room mustard-and-cream Federal-style frame house, was built in 1808 for a certain States Morris Dyckman upon his return from England (where, like many staunch loyalists, he'd fled after the British defeat in the revolution - not unlike King Charles II, who hid from the anti-Royalist troops of Oliver Cromwell in the English forest for which the house is named). Simple and practical, the period furnishings are a far cry from the overwrought Victoriana of some of the area's other manses. Don't miss the floor in the entry hall; a cloth painted to look like marble. From here, time permitting, two great side trips across the Tappan Zee Bridge are the military academy at West Point (845/938-2638; general admission free, guided bus tour $6 adults, under 12 $3) and the Storm King modern art center (Old Pleasant Hill Road, Mountainville, 845/534-3115; adults $7, seniors $5, students $3, under 5 free). Continue north into nearby Cold Spring, one of the Valley's more charming - though admittedly expensivish - towns (though with several decently priced dining spots). Stroll along Main Street, admire the neat Victorian homes and poke around the many shops and antiques dealers that have sprung up to serve the weekend hordes from New York. Another 27 miles on Route 9 will take you to Hyde Park (zooming through the sprawl of Poughkeepsie), in terms of mansions perhaps the Valley's mother lode. Its pi`ce de résistance is the Franklin Delano Roosevelt National Historic Site (Rte. 9, 845/229-9115; nps.gov/hofr), the birthplace, home, and gravesite of our 32nd president. Dating from the early nineteenth century, the Georgian colonial revival edifice (known as Springwood) offers a fascinating look into his life with furnishings, busts, and memorabilia. The first-ever Presidential Library and Museum is here, too, born of FDR's desire to provide future generations with easy access to the documents of his presidency. The museum offers thought-provoking exhibits ranging from his role in World War II to his White House desk to Eleanor Roosevelt (whose Dutch-style hideaway, Val-Kill, is also on the estate and visitable). De rigueur for students of excess, on the other hand, is the nearby Vanderbilt Mansion (Rte. 9, 845/229-9115; nps.gov/vama). The most opulent - some might say tacky - of the houses, the 55-room Italian Renaissance extravaganza was built by Frederick Vanderbilt (grandson of Cornelius, the original robber baron) at the height of the Gilded Age of the 1890s, a time when famous (and infamous) financiers and magnates rode roughshod over the American landscape. A highlight is the boudoir of Louise Vanderbilt, done up in a style I call "Liberace gone loco"-an orgy of curlicues, tapestries, and gilding. Use Hyde Park as a base for checking out lots of other attractions within striking distance: apart from the Samuel Morse home and museum in Poughkeepsie (2683 South Rd., 845/454-4500; lgny.org), nearby are several pick-your-own apple and berry farms (I especially like Greig Farm on Pitcher Lane in Red Hook, 845/758-1234); the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in Rhinebeck (44 Stone Church Rd., Rhinebeck, 845/758-8610; museum $6 adults, $2 ages 6-10, weekdays; museum/air show $12 adults, $5 ages 6-10, weekends), a museum and summertime air show featuring World War I aircraft; and the Omega Institute (150 Lake Dr., Rhinebeck, 800/944-1001), a moderately priced New Age resort east of Rhinebeck that from May to October offers summer-camp-style pleasures mixed with classes and talks on topics both familiar and far-out. Sleeps  The Inn at Hyde Park (537 Rte. 9; 845/229-9161) Twenty-two smallish, plainish units in a beige woodframe motel across from Rollermagic. Doubles $55-$65. The Roosevelt Inn (4360 Rte. 9, 845/229-2443, fax 845/229-0026) Twenty-five clean-cut, basic rooms in a brown-shuttered building; doubles from $45-$55. Vanderbilt Motel (Rte. 9 at Linden La., 845/229-7100, fax 845/229-5312) A tad dated and no pool, but still a good value at $49-$64; 18 rooms. Golden Manor (522 Rte. 9, 845/229-2157) A charming Greek Revival-style motel with 38 impeccable rooms and a large outdoor swimming pool, run by a welcoming Korean-American family; doubles $45-$65. Super 8 Motel (4142 Rte. 9, 845/229-0088, fax 845/229-8088) Cute faux-Tudor two-story property with 61 comfortable rooms, $69-$100. Eats Cold Spring: Cold Spring Depot (1 Depot Sq., 845/265-2305) Possibly the most happening spot in town, with indoor/outdoor seating and a menu whose best bets are daily specials and pub food, served with sides or salad, $8 to $15. Cold Spring Pizza (120 Main St., 845/265-9512) A full Italian menu (ranging from $5.50 to $12) and quality pizzas in a simple setting. Hyde Park: Pete's Famous Diner/Restaurant (546 Rte. 9, 845/229-1475) Better-than-diner fare in a cute setting. Best deal: $7-to-$10 combo platters including sides, soup, and salad. Eveready Diner (540 Rte. 9; 845/229-8100) Cheerful Art Deco-style chrome diner offering home-style dinners for $7-12, including fresh veggies, salad, and bread. Best Wok (Hyde Park Plaza, Rte. 9, 845/229-0319) Simple but tasty Chinese take-out joint with a handful of tables; entrées around $7 and combination platters (with fried rice and egg roll) around $6. Hyde Park to Hudson (35 Miles) The northernmost stretch of our Route 9 itinerary includes some jewels of its own, including Clermont, a white-frame colonial-era landmark tucked away in northern Dutchess County, so we cruise north, sometimes on Route 9, sometimes along hilly country lanes bordered by low stone walls and fruit orchards, with quick stops along the way at the grand Mills Mansion (Old Post Rd., Staatsburg, 845/889-8851; adults $3, ages 5-12 $1), another Gilded Age robber baron's playground between Hyde Park and Rhinebeck, and at Montgomery Place (845/758-5461; adults $6, seniors $5, ages 5-17 $3), a lovely nineteenth-century jewel on Annandale-on-Hudson's picturesque River Road. North of Red Hook and west of Route 9 (518/537-4240; adults $3, seniors $2, kids 5-12 $1) is the oldest (1730s) and charmingly simplest of the riverfront estates - Clermont, the ancestral homestead of the Livingston clan. George Washington and other founding fathers really did sleep here; it was, in fact, Robert Livingston who administered the oath of office to our first president and served as minister to France. As if that weren't enough, he also bankrolled Robert Fulton's history-making steamboat - which took its name from the house and stopped by in 1807 on its maiden voyage down the Hudson. From Clermont, the last half-hour stretch of Route 9 takes you past more orchards and on to the once-roughneckish town of Hudson, a former whaling center that fell on hard times when that industry went belly up, and more recently has reinvented itself as the Valley's antiques capital, with pricey consignment shops everywhere you look and even the occasional celebrity driving up from New York to refurbish the penthouse (fortunately, most lodging and restaurant prices haven't yet gone similarly upscale). Take a leisurely stroll through the restored red-brick downtown, which mostly means Warren Street and antiquing. Not all of it's priced out of reach; some surprising, smaller values can still be snagged here. Two more local manses merit stops. In the town of Kinderhook about a half hour north on Route 9H is Lindenwald (518/758-9689; adults $2, under 16 free), the eclectic Victorian home and farm of Martin van Buren. Our eighth president may not be our best known, but he did help lay the foundations for the partisan politics we all know and love. The second house is one of the Hudson Valley's funkiest sights, perched high on a hill four miles south of Hudson and right across from the Rip Van Winkle Bridge leading across the Hudson to the Catskills. Commanding a view of the mighty Hudson slicing through wooded hills, Olana (Rte. 9G, 518/828-0135; adults $3, seniors $2, kids 5-12 $1) is the the quirky Persian-style home of nineteenth-century landscape painter Frederick Church that has caused many a jaw (my own included) to literally drop. Inside, the decor is eclectic but heavy on Islamic art. In a way, it's more about the setting than the house-which, while interesting enough with its fancy brickwork and Victorianoid turrets, is clunky in its attempt to re-create the subtleties of Middle Eastern architecture in a New World setting. From Hudson, drive directly back to New York City in two hours on the Taconic Parkway or the New York State Thruway, cut eastward to the Berkshires of Massachusetts on Route 23, or continue north toward Albany and western New York. The Hudson Valley may be a shiny touristic jewel in New York State's crown, but this is a region that just keeps on giving. Sleeps Warren Inn (731 Warren St., 518/828-9477, fax 518/828-3575) The Valley's best value, a former movie theater with 14 lovely, recently renovated rooms for $45 double year-round right in the historic district. Joslen Motor Lodge (320 Joslen Blvd., off Rte. 9, 518/828-7046) Sixteen fresh and impeccable units five minutes north of downtown; doubles $60-$70 ($100 with a kitchenette). St. Charles Hotel (16-18 Park Place, 518/822-9900, fax 518/822-0835) For a touch of class, this elegant, 34-room property, recently renovated, rents out doubles from $79-$119 year-round. EatsColumbia Diner & Restaurant (717 Warren St., 518/828-9083) Simple, honest food and value in an authentic chrome diner; seven or so daily specials (with sides) $4 to $6. Earth Foods Cafe Deli (523 Warren St., 518/822-1396) Freshly prepared, wholesome fare from $6 to $12 in a rustic cafe in the thick of downtown.

    Road Trips

    Hudson Valley Revisited

    The Hudson River, once America's central transportation artery, tends to be overlooked nowadays. Weekenders from New York City and upstate residents choose the efficiency of the New York State Thruway and the Taconic Parkway over the Nines (as I like to call the various branches of Route 9 that ramble along both sides of the Hudson River Valley). This just means less traffic for the rest of us. Day one: New York to Fishkill Trying a new route out of New York City, I actually get lost in Yonkers. The mini-detour allows me to enjoy the back roads that hug the Hudson, which I can see through the trees, flowing on my left. Back on Route 9 proper, I decide to stop at Sunnyside, the home of writer Washington Irving. (The town of Sleepy Hollow is up the road.) Guides in period costume offer tours of the house, a quaint cottage on the riverbank; it's where the well-traveled author spent his final days. A quarter mile north I also pop in to see Lyndhurst, the grand Gothic Revival mansion of Wall Street tycoon Jay Gould, who traveled by yacht from his waterfront property to New York City. The railroad would have been quicker, but it was owned by his archenemy, Cornelius Vanderbilt. Highlights of the daily tour are Gould's Renaissance-art collection and the fine stained-glass windows. I stop in Tarrytown for lunch: a Portuguese feast at Caravela. Grilled octopus melts in the mouth, just as it should, and the codfish croquettes are rich yet fluffy. Heading north up 9, I decide to keep Kykuit, John D. Rockefeller's expansive family home, for another trip and move on to Croton Gorge Park, a favorite local picnic spot. The park sits at the base of the Croton Dam, which holds most of New York City's drinking water. It was built in 1842; until 1955, the water was transported to the city via the Croton Aqueduct. Just past Peekskill, Route 9 splits into two parts. I take 9D, which runs along the river, rather than 9 proper, which takes a faster inland path north. Where's that Beatles CD when I need it? I'm on a long and winding road, beside granite cliffs. With a bit of imagination, this could be the Italian Alps. The tricky part ends at Bear Mountain Bridge, which crosses the Hudson at the place where American Revolutionary forces blocked the path of the British fleet with a giant iron chain. From here it's only a half-hour drive to Cold Spring. I putter in and out of the knickknack shops of a Main Street that runs steeply toward the river - it really should be turned into a giant skateboarding park--and I take stock of the Lower Hudson's east side over farfalle al limone and a glass of Cabernet at Cathryn's Tuscan Grill. Cold Spring has a number of B&Bs, but the Courtyard by Marriott, a few miles north in Fishkill, puts me closer to Beacon, the next day's first destination. Day two: Fishkill to Rhinebeck "This place is changing overnight," says the teenager in the Chthonic Clash Coffeehouse as he fixes me a latte. "Some locals don't like it, but I say the quicker the better." Named after Mount Beacon, where colonists lit fires to warn of British troops during the Revolutionary War, the town of Beacon has been reborn thanks to the opening last year of Dia:Beacon, one of the most impressive art galleries in the country. Inhabiting a sprawling 1929 Nabisco factory, the airy 240,000-square-foot space (much of it lit by skylights) is perfect for viewing large art installations. The museum is home to pieces by 22 artists, including Andy Warhol, whose 1978 Shadows is a single work on 72 canvases, and Richard Serra, represented by seven gorgeous sculptures. You do a lot of walking at Dia, and by the end I'm hungry. I head into town for a taste of the old Beacon--bacon and eggs at the wonderfully gaudy Yankee Clipper Diner, a recently renovated downtown institution. Browsing the galleries and antiques shops that are contributing to the town's renaissance, I have no luck in my perpetual search for vintage gas station signs. But there's consolation in the excellent apple pie at the Upper Crust Café and Bakery. Up next is Hyde Park. The town is dominated by the 290-acre National Historic Site built around Franklin Delano Roosevelt's family house and the separate house built for Eleanor Roosevelt a few miles east of Route 9. FDR's father bought the family home, Springwood, in 1867. Visitors can view the house, FDR's grave site, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and Museum, which includes some 44,000 books along with his White House desk and chair. The late-afternoon light is fading slightly as I drive out of the Roosevelt site, so I put my foot to the floor. There's a piece of Hudson Valley history that I really want to catch - the ostentatious estate of Frederick William Vanderbilt, also in Hyde Park. Built in 1899, the 54-room Vanderbilt Mansion was meant to evoke European nobility, and the approach certainly feels like you've entered a royal estate. I'm too late for the house tour, but the grounds are lovely. As the sun begins to set over the western banks of the Hudson, the light casts an orange glow all around. After so much local history, a motel really won't cut it. Nearby Rhinebeck, a sophisticated town in its own right, is home to the Beekman Arms, a favorite resting place and watering hole for the weary traveler since 1766. The smell of cooking food and a roaring open fire greet you on arrival. Day three: Rhinebeck to New Paltz It's time to cross the river. The Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge offers clear views both north and south-this far upstream, the river is still over half a mile wide. Saugerties is another of those cute antiquing towns that seem to pop up every 30 miles along this part of the valley. It also has an excellent little café and deli called Ann Marie's. But Saugerties' most extraordinary attraction, Opus 40, is a few miles outside the town limits, in the foothills of the Catskills. Harvey Fite, a devotee of Mayan architecture, spent 37 years working with hand-powered tools to create a six-and-a-half-acre composition of bluestone ramps, terraces, pools, and fountains, with a nine-ton monolith as its centerpiece. He died in 1976, but the sculpture and a museum dedicated to his work are open from Memorial Day to Columbus Day. The road down from Opus 40 is narrow and winding, so it comes as some relief to get back on 9W, on the western side of the Hudson. At Kingston, I cut inland on Route 32. I'm headed to New Paltz and one of the region's most impressive landmarks. A 251-room Victorian castle on Lake Mohonk in the Shawangunk Mountains, the Mohonk Mountain House was a getaway destination for Teddy Roosevelt and Andrew Carnegie, among others. Today it's an exclusive retreat far beyond my budget. But you can buy a day pass to the grounds for $15 ($11 for kids) and spend the afternoon wandering. Day four: New Paltz to New York It takes about 25 minutes to get back to 9W from New Paltz, but from that point on, the road is right by the river. This part of the valley is wine country - at least six vineyards lie between New Paltz and Newburgh, and most offer tours and tastings. I turn right off Route 9 just south of Marlboro and head up a steep hill to Benmarl Winery, site of America's oldest vineyard. A rugged driveway leads to the main house, also the home of owner Mark Miller, who in the '50s and '60s was an illustrator for romance magazines and novels. Miller offers a lively narrative as he guides you through the cellars and a gallery devoted to his former profession. He might even join in a tasting of his trademark Chardonnay and Zinfandel. Leaving Benmarl, I drive into Newburgh, toward the newly renovated waterfront. Newburgh Landing is part of a $1.8 million state-funded scheme to tidy up the Hudson River. It's home to a number of cool cafés and restaurants. I choose Café Pitti, a brick-oven pizza joint with outdoor seating and a fine view of Dia:Beacon across the river. An espresso and some raspberry gelato make the afternoon even more enjoyable and prepare me nicely for the final drive back into New York City. I make quick time through West Point, hop on to the Palisades Parkway, and zip back down to the George Washington Bridge and New York City, stopping just once more to marvel at the tall, sheer vertical drop of the ancient Palisades cliffs that tower over the Hudson below. Finding your way From JFK airport, head north on the Van Wyck Expressway to the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge. After crossing, take 678 north to the Cross Bronx Expressway west; exit at Route 9 north. From LaGuardia, take the Grand Central Parkway to the Triborough Bridge. Go north on the Major Deegan (I-87), then west on the Cross Bronx Expressway to Route 9 north. From Newark, drive north on the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95). Cross the George Washington Bridge and exit at Route 9 north. 1. New York to Fishkill, 64 miles If you're driving from Manhattan, take the Henry Hudson Parkway to Route 9 north. Continue through Yonkers, Tarrytown, and Sleepy Hollow. At Peekskill, switch to 9D north, which leads to Cold Spring. Continue north on 9D. At Beacon get on 82 north to Fishkill. 2. Fishkill to Rhinebeck, 28 miles From Fishkill, get on I-84 north and take it to Beacon. After Dia:Beacon, continue north on 9D, which rejoins 9 just north of Wappingers Falls, then skirts Poughkeepsie, before winding up at Hyde Park and Rhinebeck. 3. Rhinebeck to New Paltz, 50 miles In Rhinebeck, take 9 north to 9G north. Go west on Route 199 over the Kingston-Rhinecliff bridge; 9W north leads to Saugerties. For Opus 40, from the New York State Thruway at Saugerties, get on Route 212 west toward Woodstock. From the light at the Hess gas station, go 1.6 miles to a fork; turn left onto Fishcreek Road. After 2.4 miles, turn right at the stop sign onto Highwoods Road. After a half mile, turn right onto Fite Road; it ends at Opus 40's entrance. Leaving, take Glasco Turnpike east to 9W south. At Kingston, go south on Route 32 to New Paltz. Stay at the Econo Lodge. 4. New Paltz to New York, 95 miles From New Paltz, take 299 east to 9W south. It goes through Marlboro to Newburgh, and eventually to the Palisades Parkway south to the George Washington Bridge into Manhattan.

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    DESTINATION IN New York

    Westchester County

    Westchester County is located in the U.S. state of New York. It is the seventh most populated county in New York and the most populated north of New York City. According to the 2020 U.S. census, the county had a population of 1,004,457. Situated in the Hudson Valley, Westchester covers an area of 450 square miles (1,200 km2), consisting of six cities, 19 towns, and 23 villages. Established in 1683, Westchester was named after the city of Chester, England. The county seat is the city of White Plains, while the most populous municipality in the county is the city of Yonkers, with an estimated 199,663 residents in 2018. The annual per capita income for Westchester was $67,813 in 2011. The 2011 median household income of $77,006 was the fifth highest in New York (after Nassau, Putnam, Suffolk, and Rockland counties) and the 47th highest in the United States. By 2014, the county's median household income had risen to $83,422. Westchester County ranks second in the state after New York County for median income per person, with a higher concentration of incomes in smaller households. Simultaneously, Westchester County had the highest property taxes of any county in the United States in 2013.Westchester County is one of the centrally located counties within the New York metropolitan area. The county is positioned with New York City, plus Nassau and Suffolk counties (on Long Island, across Long Island Sound), to its south; Putnam County to its north; Fairfield County, Connecticut to its east; and Rockland County and Bergen County, New Jersey across the Hudson River to the west. Westchester was the first suburban area of its scale in the world to develop, due mostly to the upper-middle-class development of entire communities in the late 19th century and the subsequent rapid population growth. Because of Westchester's numerous road and mass transit connections to New York City, as well as its shared border with the Bronx, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen much of the county, particularly the southern portion, become nearly as densely developed as New York City itself.