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    White Plains,

    New York

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    White Plains is a city in Westchester County, New York, United States, and the eleventh-largest city in the state. An inner suburb of New York City, it is the county seat and commercial hub of Westchester, a densely populated suburban county that is home to approximately one million people. White Plains is located in south-central Westchester, with its downtown (Mamaroneck Avenue) 25 miles (40 km) north of Midtown Manhattan. As of 2013, the city's total population was estimated to be 57,866, up from 53,077 at the 2010 census. According to the city government, the daytime weekday population is estimated at 250,000. The city was ranked third in the top 10 places to live in New York for 2014, according to national online real estate brokerage Movoto.
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    White Plains Articles

    Road Trips

    5 fall foliage road trips through New York State

    So now, it’s a good time to jump on a road trip. Here are our suggested itineraries for a four-day road trip throughout upstate New York. However, read up on CDC and statewide COVID-19 mandates before heading out. For reference, I Love New York, the state’s tourism board, puts out a weekly fall foliage map report on their website. Chasm (Little Grand Canyon of East), New York. ©ujjwalstha/ShutterstockRoad trip 1: The Adirondacks Where to Stop: Lake Placid tells about the 1980 Winter Games with present-day restaurants and attractions and is close to the High Peaks Wilderness. Its challenging 46 Peaks will reward you with sweeping foliage views. Eight miles from Lake Placid, Saranac Lake has a buzzing downtown with shops, galleries and restaurants, or see Saranac Lake 6ers, a close-by collection of six beautiful peaks. Or jaunt along the scenic route to Tupper Lake and to the Wild Center, whose Wild Wild platformed trail heads across the treetops. The Tawahus Road leads to the Upper Works Trailhead, which provides an alternative route to traditional northern or eastern access to the High Peaks Wilderness. Trails at the Crown Point State Historic Site, on the shores of Lake Champlain, lead to two Revolutionary War-era fort ruins. In Bolton Landing, Adirondack Extreme Adventure Course is the largest aerial tree-top adventure park in the U.S. The Lake George area is a premier hiking destination with unparalleled beauty of the Adirondacks. Some hikes, such as The Pinnacle, jaunt along wooded trails with a switchback or two to ease the climbing burden. Where to eat: In Lake Placid, Golden Arrow’s restaurant, Generations, is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with grown and raised locally menu. Up the road from Crown Point State Historic Site, Gunnison's Orchards & Bakery serves up fresh-baked pastries, bread, cookies, pies, and their cinnamon cider donuts. End your day at Ledge Hill Brewery, for handcrafted ales and lagers mindfully brewed in Westport. Road Trip 2: Capital-Saratoga Where to stop: Starting from the Helderberg Hilltowns, John Boyd Thacher State Park in Voorheesville is perched atop the Helderberg Escarpment, with panoramic views of the Hudson-Mohawk valleys and the Adirondack and Green mountains. After hiking along the park’s Indian Ladder Trail, take a nine-minute drive to Indian Ladder Farms in Altamont. Kids can pick apples and pet farm animals and parents can unwind at the cidery and brewery tasting room. Lastly, at Falls View Park, marvel at Cohoes Falls, New York State’s second largest waterfall. Where to eat: Nine Pin Cider, New York's first farm cidery, has a tasting room in Albany’s Warehouse District, with a rotating selection. Find a traditional or a new flavorful spin on the apple cider donut at Cider Belly Doughnuts, in the heart of downtown Albany. Afternoon sun on sunset rock during Autumn, overlooking North-South Lake in the Catskills Mountains of New York. ©lightphoto/Getty Images Road Trip 3: Hudson Valley Where to stop: From New York City, first explore the lower Hudson Valley river towns, beginning in Tarrytown at the Lyndhurst Mansion along the Hudson River. Next, drive north to Garrison to see the Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center, the former home of industrial designer Russel Wright. Then, Dia:Beacon is a contemporary art museum in a Nabisco box-printing factory, whose exterior grounds were designed by artist Robert Irwin. Head to the Walkway Over the Hudson, the world’s longest elevated pedestrian bridge connecting Poughkeepsie and Highland. From Highland, drive north approximately 25 minutes to Kingston to check out the historic waterfront district. Pumpkin and apple picking can be done at Samascott Farm Orchard and Golden Harvest Farms in nearby Valatie. Where to eat: In Tarrytown, stop by the Sweet Grass Grill for a local and seasonal focused meal. In Kingston, Outdated Café has a range of salads, egg dishes, and more; purchase antiques too. For drinks, hot spots include River Outpost Brewing (Peekskill), Wolf & Warrior (White Plains), Decadent Ales (Mamaroneck), Sing Sing Kill (Ossining) and Captain Lawrence Brewing Company (Elmsford). Road Trip 4: Central New York Where to stop: From the North, the Scenic Byway - Route 20’s scenery offers unique of shopping experiences. Lake Classic Outfitters will fit the bill at Sam Smith’s Boatyard and The Blue Mingo Grill overlooking Otsego Lake. In Cooperstown, find not only the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, but also the Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum. Main Street is the visitor hub with baseball-themed shops, eateries and the home of Doubleday Field. Where to eat: Grab a bite to eat and an ice cream with a life-sized Elvis statue at Jerry’s Place just before reaching Cooperstown. Brooks’ House of BBQ is how to fill your belly when traveling from Oneonta in the south, or try a Bohemian-feel, experiential meal at Origins. In Cooperstown, Alex’s Bistro is a local favorite with flavor concoctions unmatched. The Middle Falls At Letchworth State Park In New York. ©Jim Vallee/Shutterstock Road Trip 5: Finger Lakes Where to stop: This trip takes you from Canandaigua along Routes 5 and 20 and down to Naples, home of the grape pie. County Road #12 Scenic Overlook, Kershaw Park and Onanda Park in Canandaigua offer scenic vistas and fresh lake water. In Naples, go to Artizanns for NY made souvenirs and stop by any of the local stands for Grape Pie. In Canandaigua, there’s a cute Main Street with all kinds of shops and a couple of roof top bars. Take a fun farm diversion to go to Lazy Acres Alpacas in Bloomfield. Finger Lakes National Forest, the only national forest in New York State, is located on a ridge between Seneca and Cayuga lakes with over 30 miles of interconnecting trails. They include the 12-mile Interloken Trail, which is part of the Finger Lakes Trail Association network. The Keuka Lake Outlet Trail lies between the villages of Penn Yan and Dresden and measures nearly seven miles of wooded trail and along waterfalls. Where to eat: Ethnic diversity is noticeable in Canandaigua’s restaurant scene or check the craft breweries in the area. In Naples. Monica’s Pies is known for its grape pie and Brew and Brats at Arbor Hill has locally made sausages, pies, wine and beers.

    Inspiration

    These Spots Win the "Travel Oscars"

    Film location scouts spend a lot of their time on the road zeroing in on the most drop-dead gorgeous, or creepy, or sophisticated places for film crews to work their magic. Each year, devoted travelers play "location scout" themselves by evaluating some of the top Oscar-nominated films for vacation-worthy destinations. Here, three of this year's winners. ASHEVILLE & SYLVA, NC The title Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri might suggest to you that the film was not shot anywhere near North Carolina. But the town of Sylva, NC, near Asheville, stood in for the fictional Missouri town in Martin McDonagh’s compelling movie, with local buildings given new facades bearing signs such as “The Ebbing Herald” and “Ebbing Police Department.” And those “three billboards” were shot east of Asheville, near Black Mountain. Local lodging is reliable and affordable, including the Cambria Hotel & Suites Downtown Asheville, which represents what we love about the Cambria brand: its’ devotion to distinctive contemporary design and great service. NEW YORK CITY & WHITE PLAINS, NY Another dose of cognitive dissonance: The Post, Steven Spielberg’s acclaimed film about the Washington Post newspaper was shot, in part, in New York. The old AT&T building in White Plains stood in for the old Post headquarters in DC (which was demolished), and Washington’s streets were re-created, complete with vintage automobiles, on a street in Brooklyn. While the NYC area is notoriously pricey for hotels, good deals are available, and we like The Look Hotel, Red Hook, an Ascend Hotel Collection member (the Ascend brand always delivers freshly designed yet homey properties), and the Cambria Hotel & Suites White Plains Downtown. ATLANTA, GA Baby Driver was shot in the streets of downtown Atlanta, including a car chase on the Buford Highway Connector southbound, and the historic Pullman Yard. Atlanta lodging includes  Inn at the Peachtrees, an Ascend Hotel Collection member, a good base of operations for exploring the city’s historic sites.

    Travel Tips

    10 Foolproof Tricks to Beat Flight Anxiety

    Does the idea of flying cause you to break out in a cold sweat? You aren't alone. More than 25 million Americans suffer from some form of flight anxiety, making aerophobia (fear of flying) the second biggest fear in the US after public speaking. If you do fall in this category, you've probably had friends and family remind you numerous times that flying is the safest mode of transportation. While that's very true – your chances of dying in a plane crash are about one in 10 million compared with a one-in-272 chance of dying in a car crash – that's not always enough to quell the jitters. And advice like showing up early at the airport to eliminate unnecessary stress is practical as well, but for the most nervous nellies among us, it takes a little bit more to get us up in the air. We turned to the experts – Todd Farchione, Ph.D., of Boston University's Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders, Martin N. Seif, Ph.D., ABPP, of the Anxiety & Phobia Treatment Center, and Captain Steve Allright of British Airways' Flying With Confidence program – to find out exactly what to do to help alleviate flight anxiety. Thanks to their advice, we put together a 10-step guide to help you conquer your fear – because nothing should stand between you and the vacation you deserve. 1. Name your phobia Figuring out what triggers your fear in the first place is an important first step toward conquering flight anxiety. Different aspects of flying can trigger different fears depending on the person – for instance, one person may be afraid of turbulence and feel nervous during a perfectly normal takeoff, while an individual with germaphobic tendencies may be more concerned about the spread of germs in a confined space. "The common denominator for more than 90 percent of flight phobics is the fear that they will become overwhelmed with anxiety during the flight," says Seif, a clinical psychologist who runs the Freedom to Fly program at the Anxiety & Phobia Treatment Center in White Plains, New York. It helps to recognize that your phobia is irrational, but you need to be able to pinpoint the cause of your fear before you can take that next step. 2. Familiarize yourself with airplane noises You're about to land and the plane is rattling like both of its wheels are about to fall off – is it time to panic? No, the carry-on luggage and the seat-back tables are shifting slightly – just like they do every time the plane takes off and lands. Sometimes all it takes to combat anxiety is a little information. Read up on the typical bumps and noises that may occur during a flight. It also helps to understand just how rigorous safety measures are for aircraft. For example, aircraft must be able to support one-and-a-half times the maximum load it would ever carry and weathering environmental extremes such as 120-degree temperatures. "Our anxiety is fed by 'what if?' catastrophic thoughts. Once you become knowledgeable, your 'what if' thoughts will be limited by the facts," said Seif. 3. Check the turbulence forecast While turbulence is a perfectly normal part of flying – it happens when the plane encounters normal weather patterns like air currents or clouds – the idea of shaking while in the air can be very unsettling. Turbcast (iTunes, $1.99) was designed by a pilot and analyzes weather patterns as a pilot would, giving fliers an inside look at factors like air pockets and thunderstorms that can cause turbulence in the first place. Translation: The more you know about what causes that shaky feeling and how much of it you can expect while you're airborne, the less you'll be afraid of it. 4. Bring a photo of your destination Visualizing your destination and imagining yourself there can be a powerful antidote to stress – and can help keep you focused on the prize at the end of the journey. You can do this with or without a photo, but having a physical image to refer to – whether it's a picture you've downloaded on your phone or a postcard – can help to keep your mind from wandering. Allright says another method is to "imagine yourself in a safe place, somewhere you feel comfortable and safe. Your bedroom, perhaps, or on a beach. Take yourself there with your eyes closed and relax." The idea is to take your mind off the little things that make you nervous about flying and focus on the positive aspects of your journey. 5. Skip coffee and wine Captain Allright says to avoid both caffeine and alcohol, as they can leave you feeling more dehydrated during the flight, as well as aggravate anxiety issues. Nervous fliers should avoid a seemingly comforting pre-flight alcoholic beverage, since alcohol can also make it harder for your body to adjust to being airborne and bring on a nasty bout of jet lag. Instead, opt for water and a light meal pre-flight, or carry along a light snack like carrot sticks, nuts, or an apple to keep you feeling nourished. 6. Distract yourself In a nutshell – distraction works. Airlines now provide the little comforts of home – like televisions, music channels, and magazines – to help distract you from noises and bumps during the flight and make you feel more at home in a strange place. One of the best ways to distract yourself during a flight is to bring a book that you've already started and are deeply engrossed in or a season of your favorite television show. Farchione says if people associate televisions with being safe at home, and there's a television on the plane, they will feel similar familiar feelings of comfort. 7. Tell the flight attendants Dr. Seif says it's a good idea to let others know you're not too keen on flying – you may be able to speak to the pilot briefly while you board the plane or receive extra attention from flight attendants during the flight. If you're traveling with friends or family members, talk to them about what makes you nervous so they can help alleviate the tension, but don't let the conversation spiral into a contest over who has had the scariest flight experience. Sometimes just knowing that others are available to help you in case your anxiety surfaces is enough to help keep that anxiety in check. 8. Embrace safety information No, your plane is not going to crash (and whatever you do, do NOT start envisioning disaster scenarios). But knowing that you're prepared for anything can be empowering. Watch an airline safety video while you're still in the comfort of your home so that you can "master" the procedure in your head (Air New Zealand did an especially entertaining take on the safety video, featuring characters from The Hobbit, as well as a hilarious safety video starring fitness guru Richard Simmons). Once you're on board the aircraft, take time to read the airline safety card in the seat pocket in front of you. If it makes you feel better, you could even go so far as to book your seat in the back of the plane, which has been repeatedly shown to be the safest part of the aircraft in the event of a crash. 9. Use this breathing technique Allright says deep breathing is very important during takeoff and other points during the flight where you experience anxiety. "If someone is very anxious, it is actually very difficult to change their breathing pattern," he says. "Try holding your breath and then breathing deeply, or better still, force yourself to breathe out for as long as you can and then take a long, deep breath." Seif and Farchione both recommended taking deep breaths, since this triggers the calming response and can help to prevent hyperventilation. Try to maintain a relaxed posture as well, and not cling to the chair's armrests, since this can heighten any anxiety you may be feeling. 10. Have relaxation remedies handy Some doctors prescribe anxious fliers with fast-acting anxiety medications like Xanax or Valium, but Farchione warns that you should be aware that each has its own side effects and that you may feel tired for hours after the plane has landed. If you don't have a prescription, herbal remedies like St. John's Wort or Scullcap may help calm nerves too, according to an article by USA Today. Bring the medication or the herbal remedy, but hold onto it as a "last resort" option. When you feel jitters coming on, start by employing a minor relaxant, such as sipping chamomile or peppermint tea. Farchione says that doing the things you associate with being calm and content will help remind you to remain calm as you fly. You may find that simply knowing the medication is there in case of emergency is comforting enough – and you can reap the benefits without the side effects.

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    DESTINATION IN New York

    Westchester County

    Westchester County is located in the U.S. state of New York. It is the seventh most populated county in New York and the most populated north of New York City. According to the 2020 U.S. census, the county had a population of 1,004,457. Situated in the Hudson Valley, Westchester covers an area of 450 square miles (1,200 km2), consisting of six cities, 19 towns, and 23 villages. Established in 1683, Westchester was named after the city of Chester, England. The county seat is the city of White Plains, while the most populous municipality in the county is the city of Yonkers, with an estimated 199,663 residents in 2018. The annual per capita income for Westchester was $67,813 in 2011. The 2011 median household income of $77,006 was the fifth highest in New York (after Nassau, Putnam, Suffolk, and Rockland counties) and the 47th highest in the United States. By 2014, the county's median household income had risen to $83,422. Westchester County ranks second in the state after New York County for median income per person, with a higher concentration of incomes in smaller households. Simultaneously, Westchester County had the highest property taxes of any county in the United States in 2013.Westchester County is one of the centrally located counties within the New York metropolitan area. The county is positioned with New York City, plus Nassau and Suffolk counties (on Long Island, across Long Island Sound), to its south; Putnam County to its north; Fairfield County, Connecticut to its east; and Rockland County and Bergen County, New Jersey across the Hudson River to the west. Westchester was the first suburban area of its scale in the world to develop, due mostly to the upper-middle-class development of entire communities in the late 19th century and the subsequent rapid population growth. Because of Westchester's numerous road and mass transit connections to New York City, as well as its shared border with the Bronx, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen much of the county, particularly the southern portion, become nearly as densely developed as New York City itself.