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  • Jekyll Island, Georgia
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    Jekyll Island,

    Georgia

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    Jekyll Island is located off the coast of the U.S. state of Georgia, in Glynn County. It is one of the Sea Islands and one of the Golden Isles of Georgia barrier islands. The island is owned by the State of Georgia and run by a self-sustaining, self-governing body.It was long used seasonally by indigenous peoples of the region. The Guale and the Mocama, the indigenous peoples of the area when Europeans first reached the area, were killed or forced to leave by the English of the Province of Carolina and their native allies, and by raids by French pirates. Plantations were developed on the island during the British colonial period. A few structures still standing are made of tabby, a coastal building material of crushed oyster shells. The island was developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was evacuated during World War II by order of the US government. In 1947 the state of Georgia acquired all the property, for security and preservation. A popular tourist destination, the island has beaches frequented by vacationers. Guided tours of the Landmark Historic District are available. Bike trails, walks along the beaches and sandbars, and Summer Waves, a water park, are among the active attractions. The historic district features numerous impressive and ambitious buildings from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The island is also full of wildlife, consisting of many different mammals, reptiles, and birds living and breeding in the island's inland salt marshes. In 2018, Architectural Digest named Jekyll Island one of the 50 most beautiful small towns in America.The island was listed as a census-designated place prior to the 2020 census.
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    St. Simons Island, Georgia - Coolest Small Towns 2022

    Sure, not everybody remembers that Georgia — renowned for its inland forests and mountains and urban centers like Atlanta and Savannah — has drop-dead gorgeous beaches. St. Simons Island, on the state’s southern coast, is a good place to get acquainted with the watery side of the Peachtree State. (St. Simons is one of Georgia’s four “Golden Isles,” barrier islands that also include Sea Island, Jekyll Island, and Little St. Simons island). Here, you’ll find a number of quaint villages that boast one-of-a-kind shops and museums. Explore historic sites such as St. Simons Island Lighthouse (dating back to 1872), Fort Frederick National Monument, and Christ Church. Then hit the waterways in a kayak, take a sunset bottlenose dolphin cruise, ride in unique open-air trolleys (which also offer an after-dinner Ghost Tour!), go on a cycling tour, or spend the day fishing with the help of an experienced local guide. Tuck into a plate of shrimp and grits at one of the island’s eateries,like Crabdaddy’s Seafood Grill, or stop by the Public House for exceptional pork chops. More about St. Simons Island St. Simons Island, GA St. Simons Island, GA is home to fabulous beaches, golfing, charter fishing, spas and salons, and a variety of restaurants, fun events and entertainment for everyone. Keep Reading... Meet Budget Travel’s Coolest Small Towns for 2022: Content presented by Have Fun Do Good Have Fun Do Good (HFDG) is on a mission to provide adventure seekers with a unique experience that allows them to travel while giving back to the community through volunteering. Learn more at https://havefundogood.co/

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    10 Affordable Alternatives to Luxury Resort Hotels

    Sure, luxury accommodations have it all: picturesque locations, well-appointed guest rooms, full-service spas, and activities. But they also have enormous price tags to match. From the hills of Massachusetts to the beaches of Hawaii, we scoured the U.S. for budget-friendly alternatives to some of the country’s top resorts. We sought accommodations with similar stand-out amenities, locales, and styles, but that clocked in around $250 a night (or even less). Here are some of our favorite resorts—at prices you can actually afford. 1. McCloud Mountain Lodge, TN Family-run McCloud Mountain Lodge offers the kind of pastoral views and fresh cuisine you’d expect from the justly celebrated Blackberry Farm two hours to the south, but with a much smaller price tag, from $150/night. The adults-only McCloud Lodge perches on a cliff face above a valley dotted with farm fields, red barns, and the tributaries of nearby Norris Lake, one of the area’s recreational draws. Guest rooms’ private patios overlook this epic view—one only surpassed by the vantage from the restaurant’s glass gazebo, which cantilevers over the valley. At this restaurant you'll savor house-smoked meats; the purveyor is a competitive barbecue master. 2. Liberty Hill Farm & Inn, VT Liberty Hill Farm & Inn boasts peaceful surroundings, and offers an authentic real-life farm stay at a price—$142 per adult per night—that is literally less than 10 percent that of Vermont’s only luxury, five-star resort, Twin Farms. Guests at Liberty Hill lodge in a 1825 Greek Revival farmhouse with maplewood floors and country furnishings. Nearly 300 Robeth Holsteins graze on the farm, and their fresh milk goes into creamy butter and aged Cheddar used in many of the family-style meals served here. Hiking and cross-country skiing are close at hand; the farm connects to one of the best Nordic ski trails in the Northeast. 3. Ka’anapali Beach Hotel, Maui, HI Ka’anapali Beach Hotel offers an activity lineup focused on Hawaiian cultural classes, including hula dancing kapa (cloth making), lei making, Hawaiian farming, and ukulele classes, to name a few. The resort’s oceanfront rooms and 11-acres of tropical gardens complete the island vibe, and the rates, from $256/night, are less than a third of those at Maui’s posh Montage Kapalua Bay Hawaii. 4. The Lafayette Hotel, San Diego The Lafayette Hotel has one of the most iconic—and photogenic—pools in Southern California, designed by former Tarzan actor and one of the top competitive swimmers of the 20th century, Johnny Weissmuller, in 1946. Ever since, Hollywood royalty like Ava Gardner have gathered poolside. Colorful, chic guest rooms and private bungalows wrap around the pool. Don’t miss the chance to grab a cocktail at the bar; it was the setting for the bar scene in Top Gun. And raise a glass to paying a fraction—from $109/night—of what you’d pay at nearby Rancho Valencia Resort & Spa. 5. Jekyll Ocean Club, GA South of the tony private beach of Georgia’s Sea Island, Jekyll Ocean Club is Jekyll Island’s newest addition. The modern suites are truly oceanfront; the only thing standing in between guests and the beach is the pool deck. Guests can opt for kayaks and stand-up paddle boards for tours of the island’s tidal creeks, a big savings—with room rates from $239/night—over nearby sailboat-focused, five-star The Cloister Sea Island. 6. Blantyre for Seven Hills Inn, Lenox, Massachusetts Seven Hills Inn is set on 27 acres of stunning gardens. Guests lodge in a renovated Gilded Age mansion and enjoy small-plates and craft cocktails at the in-house Plunkett Lounge. It offers easy access to the best of the Berkshires from outdoor recreation to fall foliage viewing, from farm-to-table restaurants to art institutions, like the Norman Rockwell Museum. At $99/night, you’re getting Berkshires elegance for a quarter of the price of the nearby luxe Blantyre. 7. Lakeway Resort and Spa Austin, TX Lakeway Resort Spa has great offerings: a full-service spa, three large swimming pools (one with a swim-up bar), and a restaurant with Southern comfort fare overlooking Lake Travis. In the heart of Texas Hill Country, Lakeway is a short drive—and, at $135/night, many dollars—away from the celebrated Lake Austin Spa Resort. 8. Sweet Grass Ranch, MT At family-run Sweet Grass Ranch, guests join daily rides through big-mountain country and rolling meadows, as well as casting for trout in the ranch’s streams and lakes. It’s a working cattle ranch, so accommodations are decidedly country-style. Cozy rooms are available in the historic lodge or individual cabins. Enjoy the pinch-me views and the pinch-me rates—from $225 for riders, from $180 for non-riders—especially when compared with rates at the posh Ranch at Rock Creek nearby. 9. MacCallum House, Mendocino, CA The boutique MacCallum House offers views of both the Pacific Ocean and the town of Mendocino comparable to those from the celebrated Brewery Gulch Inn, but with rates starting at a more affordable $199/night. Guests book into a charming Victorian home with a nearly wrap-around porch or rooms in the surrounding cabins or restored barn. The MacCallum House restaurant is rated one of the best on the coast, and stays include gourmet breakfasts, as well as in-room mini bars stocked with local wine. 10. The Standard Miami Beach, Miami, Florida Steps away from South Beach, The Standard features clean, modern lines and peaceful, tropical gardens. Many of the guest rooms have private terraces overlooking the beachy pool area. The spa channels the best of global wellness with a Turkish-style hammam, Roman waterfall hot tub, Finnish sauna, and an Arctic plunge pool, to name a few of the offerings. All this from $180/night, a big savings over Miami Beach’s posh Setai.

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    Affordable American Winter Beach Escapes

    When the mercury drops a little too much and the snow piles up a little too high, it’s time for a winter escape. We’ve rounded up some of America’s finest winter beaches, each with its own distinct flavor at a price that’s right. THE GEORGIA COAST When it comes to warm beaches, great price, and convenience, Georgia should spring to mind this time of year. The barrier islands of the state’s southern coast offer some of the best stretches of sand, great weather, and the welcoming vibe every vacationer craves. We love St. Simons Island for its incredible white-sand beaches, history, and ample golf courses, but we also love that the best way to get around the island may be on a rented beach cruiser bike, giving you the opportunity to leave your car behind and truly disconnect from all the stuff you went on vacation to escape. Points of interest on the island include a charming lighthouse, a 19th-century church, and ancient oak trees with their distinctive moss drapery. Grab a plate of shrimp and grits at Crabdaddy’s Seafood Grill and grab an affordable room (well under $150/night) at the Village Inn & Pub and other hotels on the island. To learn more about St. Simons Island, visit exploregeorgia.org. An easy day trip from St. Simons Island, Jekyll Island is relatively wild (more than 60 percent of its land is protected from development) and home to some of the most beautiful beaches in Georgia. Just drive back to the mainland from St. Simons and over the bridge to Jekyll, where you’ll find 10 miles of beach (including favorites Driftwood and Glory), the 250-acre Historic Landmark District, the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, a water park, and four golf courses. To learn more about Jekyll Island, visit exploregeorgia.org. Tybee Island is a 20-minute drive from Savannah, making it one of the most convenient winter escapes in the U.S., not to mention one of the most affordable. Here, you’ll find classic beach activities like a boardwalk, pier, and souvenir shops, low-key restaurants like the Crab Shack (yu must try the steamed oysters and Low Country boil with shrimp, sausage, and potatoes), and comfy motels, the beachfront Hotel Tybee (well under $150/night) and others. What’s not to love? Don’t miss the Tybee Island Light Station and Museum, a 270-year-old site with historic buildings that visitors can tour and the Civil War-era Fort Pulaski National Monument on nearby Cockspur Island. To learn more about Tybee Island, visit exploregeorgia.org. MOLOKAI, HAWAII No traffic lights. No resorts. The world’s highest sea cliffs. Volcanoes (don’t worry they’re extinct). If you can’t relax on Molokai, the least-visited of the major Hawaiian islands, it’s possible you’re just not trying hard enough. Seek out the gold sand of Papohaku beach, visit the island’s biggest town (a whopping 7,000 people live there), and head to downtown Kaunakakai for local Hawaiian favorites such as mahi-mahi. CATALINA ISLAND, CALIFORNIA For anyone who has visited Los Angeles and complained about the traffic (aka, everyone): We love the fact that cars aren’t allowed on Catalina, just 22 miles off the Southern California coast, unless you count golf carts, which you can rent if you really need to. Yes, this is a place to really get away from it all. After the 90-minute ferry ride, you’ll enter another world, where bicycles are the best way to get around, and exploring the island’s interior in search of birds (you may even see a bald eagle), is one of the prime activities. The town of Avalon is where you’ll find charming shops, restaurants, and affordable lodging. PUERTO RICO Besides being a quick flight from many U.S. cities, no passport required, Puerto Rico can also use your help: Tourism dollars help fund the island’s recovery from hurricane damage sustained in 2017. You’ll love the beaches, great food, and natural beauty, typified by El Yunque National Forest, a rainforest (bring a poncho!), perfect for a half- or full-day guided tour of sites such as La Coca Falls and the Yokahu Lookout Tower. Feast on traditional local fare such as arepas and plantains, washed down with a pina colada (the drink was invented in Puerto Rico in the 1950s), and tour charming Old San Juan, one of the oldest and most historic city centers in the U.S. For great views, visit El Morro National Monument, a 16th-century Spanish colonial fort that offers some of the most Instagrammable moments in the Caribbean. ST. CROIX, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS The easternmost point in the United States is in the Caribbean, in the U.S. Virgin Islands: St. Croix may be small as far as islands go, but when it comes to winter getaways, it sure reminds you that good things come in small packages, with great opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, eating Caribbean favorites such as conch and snapper, and acres of golf for those who define “vacation” as time on the links. We love historic Christiansted, where you’ll find reliable hotels and restaurants at good prices.

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    DESTINATION IN Georgia

    Golden Isles

    The Golden Isles of Georgia are a group of four barrier islands and the mainland port city of Brunswick on the 100-mile-long coast of the U.S. state of Georgia on the Atlantic Ocean. They include St. Simons Island, Sea Island, Jekyll Island, Little St. Simons Island, and Historic Brunswick. Mild winters, together with natural beaches, vast stretches of marshland, maritime forests, historical sites, and abundant wildlife on both land and sea have made the Golden Isles a travel destination for families, nature-lovers, fishing and water sports enthusiasts, golfers, and history buffs. All the islands are located within Glynn County and make up the lower middle section of Georgia's eleven barrier islands. Annual mild temperatures average 68 °F, with July highs of 90 °F. St. Simons is the largest of the four, with a permanent population of 12,743 residents as of the 2010 census. Curled around its north end and accessible only by boat is Little St. Simons Island—privately owned and maintained in its natural state with a small capacity guest lodge and cottages. Jekyll Island is owned by the state of Georgia and operated as a state park, with limited residential areas. Sea Island is owned by Sea Island Acquisitions, LLC, and is home to the world-famous Cloister resort and residential homes valued in the millions of dollars.The City of Brunswick traces its history back to early Colonial times, and the founding of the Georgia colony by General James Oglethorpe. From its earliest days, the port of Brunswick was important to the growth and economy of the new nation. In 1789, George Washington named Brunswick one of the five original ports of entry for the thirteen colonies. During World War II, Brunswick hosted an important construction site for Liberty ships, and Naval Air Station Glynco, a major operational base for blimps. Tourism is the most important economic driver in the Golden Isles, with an estimated 2.4 million visitors in 2014. Other key components of the local economy include the Port of Brunswick, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, aviation support services, and manufacturing. Travelers to the area arrive primarily via Brunswick Golden Isles Airport and Interstate 95. McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport serves general aviation.