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    McDonough,

    Georgia

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    McDonough is a city in Henry County, Georgia, United States. It is part of the Atlanta metropolitan area. Its population was 22,084 at the 2010 census, up from 8,493 in 2000. The city is the county seat of Henry County.The unincorporated communities of Blacksville, Flippen, Kelleytown, and Ola are located near McDonough, and addresses in those communities have McDonough postal addresses.
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    McDonough Articles

    Budget Travel Lists

    6 Oahu Hikes That Belong on Your Bucket List

    From picturesque views of turquoise water to stunning waterfalls and lush tropical forests, there is a trail on Oahu to please every type of outdoor enthusiast and hikers of all skill levels. The best part? Working them into a day full of other adventures is a cinch. All quadrants of the island have a hike to offer tourists and locals alike, as well as sights to see and food to devour. Whether it is a quick sweat session followed by some fun in the sun or a longer, more strenuous workout with pupus to punctuate the day, there is something for everyone on the beautiful Hawaiian island of Oahu.  1. Koko Head Crater Trail (Gennadiyp/Dreamstime) Koko Head Crater Trail, one of the most strenuous island hikes, is a former railway turned hike that is not for the faint of heart. Comprised of over 1,000 railway ties arranged like stairs, this 1.5-mile roundtrip trek will test the endurance of even the most avid hikers with steep inclines and a portion that acts as a bridge, as the under footing has completely eroded. The panoramic views of Hanauma Bay, Hawaii Kai, and Makapu’u make this hike worth it. The wide “stairs” offer plenty of space to step off to the side for a water break and it’s not uncommon to see children and runners frequenting this trail—it’s popular! Try to get here before it gets too hot, and be sure to pack plenty of water. When finished, head into Kaimuki, a suburb of Honolulu, for brunch at Koko Head Cafe (headed up by Top Chef alum Lee Ann Wong) and stay awhile to browse at Sugarcane Shop, a local boutique that sources gifts and souvenirs from local artists. 2. Lanikai Pillboxes (Kalai80/Dreamstime) Located on the east side of Oahu, Lanikai Pillboxes is a short hike that offers screensaver-worthy views of turquoise water and white sandy beaches throughout. The one-mile roundtrip trail starts with a steep vertical incline, then hits relatively flat terrain followed by a hilly peak before reaching the summit marked by two "pillboxes" (former military bunkers). Views at the top extend over Kailua and Lanikai Beaches, some of the best the windward side of Oahu has to offer, with the Mokulua Islands dotting the backdrop. Because the entrance to this hike is buried within a residential neighborhood across from the Mid Pacific Country Club, parking can be tricky, so adhere to the no-parking signs and be respectful of homeowners' driveways. The Pillboxes put you in a prime location for venturing into Kailua Town for post-hike light bites at the Kalapawai Café (be sure to order the browned-butter salted chocolate chip cookie for later), followed by shave ice, a Hawaiian staple, at President Obama’s favorite haunt, Island Snow. 3. Makapu'u Lighthouse Trail (Patrick Evans/Dreamstime) Makapu’u Lighthouse Trail’s fully paved incline makes it stroller-friendly and easy to navigate without worrying about footing, but the cliffs are steep at points, and the trail doesn’t have guardrails, so little ones have to be watched closely if they’re on their own two feet. A lookout point on the way up offers information about viewing the humpback whale migration, which occurs from November through early spring. There’s a viewing scope, but pack a pair of binoculars to increase your chances of seeing a whale or other wildlife. Views of Makapu’u Lighthouse and Koko Head greet hikers who navigate the mile to the very top, and on clear days, neighboring islands Molokai and Lanai can be visible in the distance. When you’re back at sea level, make a right out of the Makapu’u parking area, drive the coastal highway into Waimanalo for burritos at Serg’s Mexican Kitchen or a vegan plate from Ai Love Nalo, and enjoy your well-earned grub right on Waimanalo Beach, which is consistently ranked one of America’s best beaches. 4. Ehukai Pillbox Hike (Kaitlin Hanson) A short uphill hike, the Ehukai Pillbox is distinguished by the historic World War II bunkers on Oahu’s North Shore. The path’s entrance is located across the street from Sunset Beach and a muddy trail with a few built-in stairs that lead to captivating views of the famed Banzai Pipeline, where surfers like Kelly Slater and John John Florence ride the waves each winter. A painted picnic bench makes for a good water break stop before heading up to the first bunker, where the forest opens up to unobstructed ocean views. For those continuing to the second pillbox, a giant peace sign painted on a rock marks the spot where soldiers would watch for enemy ships during World War II. The incline on this 1.5-mile roundtrip hike is enough to make it slightly strenuous, so be sure to stop by Ted’s Bakery to refuel. Grab a slice of the famous haupia pie and take it across the street to eat on the sand before continuing on to explore Turtle Bay Resort, where Forgetting Sarah Marshall was filmed. 5. Aiea Loop Trail (Joshua Mcdonough/Dreamstime) The Aiea Loop Trail is an easy-to-moderate trail that clocks in at just under five miles and overlooks Honolulu and the surrounding neighborhoods. Mostly covered by lush foliage, the trail meanders through slight elevation changes and is a good choice for a more shaded experience. Part of the greater Keaiwa Heiau State Park (open daily from 7:00 a.m. to 6:45 p.m.), the Loop also leads to Kalauao Falls, which can be accessed via a side trail, an option for more experienced hikers who can easily navigate steep inclines. The trailhead is centrally located on the island, which makes it a great option before or after visiting Pearl Harbor (advance reservations recommended). On the way back toward Honolulu on Nimitz Highway, stop at La Tour Cafe for a crispy chicken sandwich, then try a coco puff, a cream-filled pastry that all the locals rave about, a half-mile down the road at Liliha Bakery. Drive just a bit further into the up-and-coming neighborhood of Kaka’ako to explore the hand-painted murals by local artists that are refreshed annually. 6. Waimea Falls Park + Botanical Garden (Kaitlin Hanson) Hikers of all levels can enjoy Waimea Falls (open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; $17 for adults, discounted admission for seniors, children, and military), a tropical park that boasts a botanical garden and waterfall, located across the street from Waimea Bay. Around two miles out and back, the lush flora and fauna of Oahu surround a simple walking trail that leads to the 30-foot waterfall. A run-off pool below offers visitors the opportunity to cool off and take a dip under lifeguard supervision. Exhibit signs along the trail provide guests the opportunity to learn about the plants and history of Waimea Valley. After visiting the waterfall, head a half-mile up the road to snorkel or dive at Shark’s Cove, one of the best spots on the island for spotting marine life. Before heading out, walk across the street to grab a fresh poke bowl or Tsunami Sandwich from Aji Limo Food Truck, then relax on the sand to catch the sunset at Waimea Bay.

    Road Trips

    The Midwest's Coolest Road Trip

    Let's be honest: The media has been none too kind to the Rust Belt over the years. The usual visual clichés—shuttered factories and empty storefronts—have reinforced the idea that the region is no vacation destination. That's old news. To bypass the stretch of the Rust Belt between Cleveland and Pittsburgh is to miss out on the pleasures of heritage and history and the excitement of an evolution in progress. I have experienced both the tradition and the transformation of this area firsthand. After living elsewhere in the U.S. for more than a decade, I moved back to Northeast Ohio, hoping to reconnect with what I knew and loved about the region and discover what else is in the works. What better way to become reacquainted with my Rust Belt roots than to hit the road with a new perspective and an old friend—my sister. Day 1: Cleveland to Youngstown, Ohio (75 Miles) We started our trip from my home in the suburbs of Cleveland—a city that deserves far more than a one-day drop-in. A major player in the history of manufacturing in Ohio and a community deeply invested in revival, Cleveland has enough music and cultural attractions, groundbreaking dining spots, and reasonably priced entertainment to justify a much longer getaway. When visiting the North Coast—named as such for Lake Erie, Cleveland’s northern border—for any length of time, do not miss the West Side Market in the Ohio City neighborhood (1979 W. 25th St., crepes from $5). In 2012, the market celebrated its 100th anniversary, and one stroll through the indoor bazaar of fresh meats, pastries, cheese, and produce on a Saturday morning will show you why it has thrived for more than a century. We hit the road on Interstate 80, the Ohio Turnpike. For all the times I had traveled east on the turnpike, never had I stopped at Cuyahoga Valley National Park—a 33,000-acre preservation framing the Cuyahoga River (1550 Boston Mills Rd., Peninsula). The rolling crests of the valley and rich forest had always been a pleasant sight from the highway, but to actually experience the park is to know that it really is a national treasure. We made the easy hike to Brandywine Falls then enjoyed the cliffs and birches of the Ledges Trail. Just an hour east of the park is the city of Youngstown, a place full of rich traditions and cultural assets. The Butler Institute of American Art is a marvel that boasts more than 10,000 works from the colonial era to the modern and contemporary periods, including paintings by big-name artists like Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, Chuck Close, and Georgia O’Keeffe (524 Wick Ave, free). For a different aesthetic, jump across the street to the McDonough Museum of Art, which features primarily contemporary works (525 Wick Ave). The sleek Modernist facility provides a satisfying contrast to the classically designed Butler. A visitor will not go hungry in Youngstown unless she works at it. Diligently. Just two blocks from the art museums is Cassese's MVR, a restaurant that began in 1927 as a pool room and was granted the second liquor license in the city at Prohibition's end (410 N. Walnut St.). Since 1938, the Cassese family has served Italian American favorites named for relatives, friends, and the chefs who have made the food something to keep coming back for. The sauce is still homemade, as is most of the menu. We enjoyed a meal on the back patio, where we took in the sights and sounds of bocce on three gravel courts. We were so engrossed in the games that we almost passed up the pizza. For the crust alone, we're lucky that we didn't. Among all that was familiar in Youngstown, we stumbled upon something new to us: Rust Belt Brewing Company, a craft brewery that makes its beers in the old B&O train station along the Mahoning River and serves them in its downtown Tap House (beers from $4.50, 112 W. Commerce St.). The flight of brews we sampled ranged from the dark-roasted Coke Oven Stout to the deliciously floral Peacemaker Imperial IPA. Jillian Blair, brewery manager, explained the brewery's interest in celebrating the city's industrial identity while refining a familiar concept. "We want to brew a good beer that everyone can enjoy," Blair said. "We think of it as giving back to and honoring the American worker." In the summer months, stopping by one of Youngstown's many Italian heritage festivals is a must. Events like the Brier Hill Italian Fest made eating trailer-prepared cavatelli, spicy sausage sandwiches, and apple dumplings cool long before the food-truck trend (Victoria and Calvin streets). Youngstown, Ohio, to Columbiana, Ohio (18 Miles) Before leaving, we took in two glimpses of Youngstown from Fellows Riverside Gardens (123 McKinley Ave). On one end of the bloom-laden garden is a panorama of downtown; the other overlooks Lake Glacier and the northern edge of 2,330-acre Mill Creek Park. The central stretch of rolling, well-tended lawn invites leisurely strolls with plenty of pauses to smell the award-winning roses. Inspired by memories from childhood, we made our way down to Lake Glacier and rented pedal boats (Glacier Boathouse, West Glacier Dr.). Just a half hour of pedaling across the still, forest- framed lake and we were ready to drift and enjoy the scenery. Farther south in Mill Creek Park we visited Lanterman’s Mill, a working grist mill that has been stone-grinding wheat, buckwheat, and corn just like it did when it was first built in the mid-19th century (980 Canfield Rd.). A short drive south is Columbiana, Ohio, a small village with big rural charm. We stopped by the Shaker Woods Festival, a large gathering of craftspeople that happens for three weekends each August (44337 County Line Rd). We browsed handmade wares under a canopy of century-old trees and sampled roasted pecans, sweet kettle corn, and lemonade shakes, then stayed in the heart of the village at the Columbiana Inn, a fully renovated 1904 Beaux Arts-style B&B (rooms from $125 per night, 109 N. Main St). Its highlights include repurposed-wood decor and innkeeper Paul Bissell's world-famous hash browns—a potato masterpiece of local garlic, cheese, and sausage. Day 3: Columbiana, Ohio, to Pittsburgh (83 Miles) Winding through the Ohio River Valley on the way to Pittsburgh, we stopped where it all started for early colonial settlers and Rat Pack crooner Dean Martin: Steubenville, Ohio. Historic Fort Steuben is a replica of the fort built after the Revolutionary War to house and protect government surveyors ($5, 120 S. Third St). Their task: Lay out the first ranges of the Northwest Territory, the land destined to become Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Like Cleveland, Pittsburgh needs much more than one day for true exploration. Two hours at the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh was far from enough. We marveled at the bones of Apatosaurus louisae, the dinosaur named for Andrew Carnegie’s wife, Louise, and lingered in the photo gallery—the museum was the first to exhibit photography as art. During a stop for a quick burst of fuel at La Prima Espresso Bar in the Strip District, Italian language teacher turned coffee importer Sam Patti educated us on how to do espresso in the traditional style: Start with a single, well-made shot and enjoy it while standing at the bar, preferably with good conversation and good friends (single espresso $2, 205 21st St). For dinner, we sipped alcohol-free birch beer and chose from an ever-changing selection of "untraditional" pierogies at Church Brew Works—an old church turned microbrewery (pierogie $18.50, 3525 Liberty Ave). Before heading to bed at lovely Sunnyledge Boutique Hotel and Tea Room (rooms from $139 per night, 5124 Fifth Ave), we rode the historic Duquesne Incline ($2.50, 1197 W. Carson St) overlooking downtown Pittsburgh, a fitting end to our Rust Belt road trip: watching the sun set on where we'd been and looking forward to where we might go next.

    Inspiration

    Five Hamburg Neighborhoods Best Explored By Bike

    This article was written by Megan Eileen McDonough, Founder of Bohemian Trails. Despite being Europe's richest city, Hamburg's humble neighborhoods don't show off, but rather, showcase both old and new influences in true style. From alternative Sternschanze and lively St. Pauli to modern HafenCity, these five neighborhoods showcase the many faces of Hamburg. The next time you find yourself in the Baltic Sea Region, head straight to Hamburg and rent a bike for the best city views. SternschanzePerhaps one of Hamburg's best examples of gentrification, Sternschanze, or simply "Schanze," is Hamburg's hippest neighborhood of the moment. The graffiti-covered buildings and walls give the area a charming grungy appeal while the high-end restaurants, trendy cafes and fashion boutiques provide a stark contrast. Due to an increase in rents, many families and couples have flocked to the area but it's still a cultural playground for all residents. HafenCityEven from a distance, HafenCity looks completely different than anywhere else in Hamburg. This brown development project, when completed, will affect a total of ten neighborhoods of different sizes. In a nutshell, the entire area is undergoing a serious revamp, with hotels, offices, shops, buildings and residential spaces replacing old port warehouses. From an architectural standpoint, it's impressive to say the least and easy to get around by bike. St. PauliSt. Pauli might be better known as Hamburg's "red-light district," but there's also a bit of Beatles' history here. The Reeperbahn is the main street and serves as an unofficial divider between day and night attractions. On one side there are galleries and on the other, a slew of nightclubs. Things generally pick up around 11pm and it can get rather crowded, so keep an eye out for traffic. Swing by INDRA, the music venue where the Beatles first performed. KarolinenviertelAlthough technically the northern part of St. Pauli, Karolinenviertel has a distinct look and feel that deserves just as much attention. Park your bike near Marktstraße and and wander in and out of the shops. This area has experienced quite a bit of gentrification as well yet there are still remnants of what it looked liked years before. Fashionistas should head to Maison Suneve and those on the hunt for home goods with a twist will appreciate Lockengeloet. AltonaAn independent city until 1937, Altona is now part of Hamburg and an emerging one at that. The Altona Museum gives a great crash course into the area while Ottensen is the main street for shopping as well as bars, cafes and restaurants. Since Altona is more west than the other neighborhoods on this list, biking is a quick and easy way to experience everything from the architecture to the bohemian atmosphere and multicultural flair. 

    Inspiration

    6 Tips For Sticking to your Budget in Switzerland

    Switzerland is one of those once-in-a-lifetime, bucket-list-worthy types of trips so of course you want to make the most of it. That said, it’s not the most affordable destination out there. While the country may have a reputation for breaking the bank [Editor's Note: Switzerland uses Swiss Francs for their main currency, not euros], you'd be surprised by how many budget alternatives are available. Here are six of my best tips for sticking to your budget and still having the best trip ever. Visit during the off-season Like any destination, traveling off-season will likely save you money. Not only are flights less expensive but hotel rates are lower, too. In Switzerland, high season is from July through mid-September and since Switzerland is also a top ski destination, December and January are popular months, too. If you’re not a fan of cold weather, shoot for either late spring or early summer. You’ll still be able to experience nice weather without the crazy crowds. For skiers, book your trip after New Years. Buy a Swiss Pass If you’re planning a multi-city trip (and even if you’re not), the Swiss Pass will likely save you a good chunk of change. In a nutshell, the pass offers unlimited travel on trains, busses, and boats. There are a few options depending on how long you plan to be in Switzerland including 3, 4, 8, or 15 consecutive day passes. Another major perk of investing in the Swiss Pass is that it grants you free access to 480 museums plus discounts to other touristic attractions. All in all, it’s a major money saver. Shop at local markets There’s no way around it; Swiss dining is pricey. Instead of splurging on three decadent meals a day, take advantage of local markets. There are open-air markets in just about every major city, each selling local produce like fruits, vegetables, cheese, meats, and bread among other treats. In some cases, you can even sample wine or buy a glass for about $6. Grocery stores in Switzerland are top-tier and affordable, especially Coop and Migros. When you do eat out, opt for bars and cafés. Find free activities Depending on when you visit, there are plenty of outdoor activities that don’t cost a thing. In Bern, for example, it’s free to swim in the River Aare. The water is chilly and the current strong, but on a hot summer day, it’s instantly refreshing. Picnics are another great way to enjoy the Swiss landscapes. Look for gardens with a city view, like the Rosengarten (rose garden) in Bern. For something a little more adventures, take a hike, literally! There is no shortage of trails in Switzerland. Know your options While spur-of-the-moment trips are certainly thrilling, they might result in unexpected costs. Researching ahead of time ensures that you know all of your options and can make the smartest decisions. When searching for hostels, hotels, or homestays, find out if breakfast and Wi-Fi are included. These perks can help cut daily costs. Similarly, it never hurts to ask your hotel for a ride. Some hotels offer complimentary shuttles to and from the airport or the train station. Pack smart Packing can be a pain but don’t just throw random items into your suitcase and hope for the best. Shopping in Switzerland isn’t cheap and you’ll want to avoid that at all costs (pun intended)! For winter trips, bring along your own sports gear. That way, when you hit the slopes, you’ll only need ski rentals. For summer stays, pack sunscreen and any medications you might need while on the road. Pharmacies are everywhere but prices are higher than what you are probably used to back home. This article was written by Megan Eileen McDonough, Founder of Bohemian Trails.

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