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    Manhattan is a city and county seat of Riley County, Kansas, United States, although the city extends into Pottawatomie County. It is located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 54,100. The city was founded by settlers from the New England Emigrant Aid Company as a Free-State town in the 1850s, during the Bleeding Kansas era. Nicknamed "The Little Apple" as a play on New York City's "Big Apple", Manhattan is best known as the home of Kansas State University and has a distinct college town atmosphere. Fort Riley, a United States Army post, is located 8 miles (13 km) west of Manhattan.
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    InspirationRediscover AmericaTravel Tips

    Most affordable destinations for New Years Eve 2022

    Priceline.com has released a list of the most affordable NYE destinations around the USA. *Based on average round-trip ticket costs and average daily hotel rates for travel anytime between December 17, 2021 - January 1, 2022. Most affordable round trip flights Times Square in NYC. Credit: schalkm, Getty Images 1. New York ($312) The ball drop in Times Square is a rite of passage, and Manhattan tends to go all out for new years eve festivities. 2. Las Vegas ($314) Vegas throws great parties! Our recommendation for NYE is this affordable 80s and 90s dance party on Fremont Street (must be 21+). Buy tickets here. 3. Fort Lauderdale ($317) Celebrate the new year in downtown Fort Lauderdale, which will have a band, free street festival, and a brilliant fireworks display at midnight. 4. Chicago ($319) Chicago has a new year's party for everyone. We count almost 30 different options for you to celebrate on the official city website, ChooseChicago. 5. Atlanta ($326) Atlanta celebrates the new year with a college football bonanza. Check out the Chic-fil-a Peach Bowl, and then celebrate your favorite team into next year. Most affordable hotels Credit: Sean Pavone, Getty Images 1. Las Vegas ($130) Say what you want about Vegas, it knows how to throw a party! Our recommendation? Dance the night away and then find a cheap hotel off the strip. Travelers can find great deals in Las Vegas on Priceline.com. 2. Pigeon Forge ($139) Pigeon Forge's Winterfest is a great family-friendly place to ring in the new year. The city puts up over 5 million lights to create a winter wonderland, as well as a fireworks display at midnight. 3. Washington, D.C. ($140) DC has a new year's party for every style and price range. Check out the list of great parties by clicking here. 4. Kissimmee, FL ($145) The Orlando area theme parks are a fabulous experience around the holidays, and several are staying open until midnight to ring in the new year, including Disney World's Epcot and Magic Kingdom. 5. Houston ($146) Houston has tons of family-friendly events to ring in the New Year. Our favorite is the High Noon Countdown at the Woodland Children's Museum on December 31. Celebrate with a dance party and several balloon drops, then get the kids home for bedtime! Check out Priceline's Season of Savings event - 6 weeks of rotating weekly deals on all types of travel. Travelers can save up to $625 on packaged bookings with extra discounts on select hotels in Las Vegas, Orlando, Mexico, and Hawaii including The Venetian Resort (LV), Virgin Hotels Las Vegas, Curio Collection by Hilton (LV), B Resort and Spa (Orlando, an official Walt Disney World Resort), Sheraton Waikiki (HI), Secrets The Vine Cancun Resort & Spa (MX, All-Inclusive and Adults Only), and more. All bookings must be made by Sunday, December 5, with travel to occur throughout 2022 (see website for exact details and terms as travel dates vary by hotel to receive additional savings). Be sure to check out Priceline.com to check out the deal of the week which is unveiled on Monday each week through January 3, 2022.

    Inspiration

    The best books to read in every state in America

    As soon as coronavirus arrived in New York City last winter, my brain became a tangle of anxious thoughts, pounding down on my already overtaxed amygdala. I had one salvation: a three-by-two map of America hanging in my living room. While most of my friends set their sights on the Balis and Bermudas of the world, my only travel goal has long been to visit every state in America. Ostensibly, this map’s point was to be the canvas for a smattering of pins until I created a multi-hued distribution upon all 50 sates. In actuality, the point was to accomplish something, to wrangle up America into a palm of pastel thumbtacks, to live a life full of stories. Stories from a life of zigzagging our great terrain this past year, it turned out, would not be in the cards as travel restrictions and lockdowns made all too clear from the outset of this mess. But as I squinted once again at the pin-less sweep of real estate on my wall somewhere between Minnesota and Oregon early last spring, I realized I could still get to work on these travels, if I got a little creative. Thus, my 50 states book project was born, where I embarked on a challenge to read a tome set in every state in the union. I still met people and places and things and disasters and triumphs, but I didn’t rent a car, or hop on a plane, or even scour the internet high and low for Clorox wipes to sanitize my hotel room. Instead, I let William Least Heat-Moon, Bill Bryson, and Paul Theroux lead me on road trips, I hung out with that guy who walked across America, Peter Jenkins, I chased redbirds in Kentucky with Sharon Creech, listened to crawdads singing in North Carolina, and I went on one hell of a bender with Hunter S. Thompson in Vegas. I spent a grand total of $233.96 buying used books on Amazon—less than an average one-night hotel stay in Chicago, mind you. I read classic texts and obscure novels, fiction and nonfiction, humorous and heartbreaking, and it completely changed the way I think about travel. For one thing, given the titles I read, I can now unequivocally say the best adventures are the outdoors ones. My nationwide literary adventure had me walking around my own little nook of a park, Sutton Place Park in Midtown Manhattan, like I was a Thoreauvian naturalist (I’m not sure how he’d feel about the giant neon Pepsi Cola sign across the East River). In lockdowns, these books gave me inspiration to find meaning in the toughest of days knowing that This Too Shall Pass, and the road awaited me. It even helped me feel a little less pissed when my well-intentioned best friend would send me gorgeous mountain-y snapshots from her quarantine castle in the Hudson Valley. After all, I had just gotten back from a whirlwind stint in Iowa. Perhaps counterintuitively, surveying a book from every state in America blurred the lines of my much-loved pushpin map. Alaska was Alabama was Kentucky was Kansas. On page 18 of my Michigan selection, The Deer Camp: A Memoir of a Father, A Family, and the Land That Healed Them by Dean Kuipers, I came across this passage: “The great American anarchist Edward Abbey is probably not a terrific role model for mature relatedness—by all reports, he had prickly relationships with other people and, like Henry David Thoreau, needed the solitude he so extolled. But in Desert Solitaire Abbey addressed that need to confront our position vis-à-vis the nonhuman world…” In a quick swoop of the pen, my Michigan author had referenced my Maine essayist and my Utah wordsmith. We’re all independent, yet linked. Separate, yet dependent. Alone in the woods, yet with your friends on the forest floor. Alaska is Alabama is Kentucky is Kansas. Alabama Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep Cep does a deep dive into Harper Lee’s true-crime book about reverend Willie Maxwell, an alleged serial murderer that never was finished and published. Her portrait of To Kill a Mockingbird’s scribe, Harper Lee, is just as fascinating as the unreal story of Maxwell. Alaska Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer There’s hardly a stretch of 10 pages in this book without creased corners and underlining, in this enthralling account of a renegade college grad who abandons the conventions of traditional life on Alaska’s harsh frontiers. Arizona Arizona Then and Now: People and Places by Karl Mondon By the time I got to my Arizona selection, my eyes had glazed over from so. much. text. Thankfully, this assortment of archival photos from the Jeremy Rowe Collection juxtaposed with modern-day photography from Mondon was exactly what I needed. Nothing will beat the heavenly Grand Canyon, but the main street photos of towns like Bisbee and Winslow really made me nostalgic for wandering a new teeny town’s downtown for the first time. Arkansas Hipbillies: Deep Revolution in the Arkansas Ozarks by Jared M. Phillips Hippies of the Haight-Ashbury variety + backwoods hillbillies = “Hipbillies.” A fascinating perspective on this Southern counterculture from the 1960s and ‘70s, I was intrigued to learn about these back-to-the-landers’ incredible impact on the future of the Ozarks. California The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan Head to San Francisco in this award-winning gem from Tan that also brings you along to China in stories of immigrant Americans, the lives and pain they left behind, and the chapters they’ve built anew. Colorado The Voyeur's Motel by Gay Talese A journalist uncovers a heck of a world after receiving an anonymous letter from a peeping Tom who owns a hotel in Aurora and spies on unknowing guests. It’s creepy, it’s can’t-put-down, and it will definitely have you look around extra carefully after you check into a hotel room. Honorable mention: Stories I Tell Myself: Growing Up with Hunter S. Thompson by Juan Thompson Connecticut The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin Well, guess I need to see the 2004 movie starring Nicole Kidman now. Because, wow, what a book: When Joanna arrives in Fairfield County with her husband and kiddos from New York City an American horror classic ensues, from the same author as Rosemary’s Baby. Delaware And Never Let Her Go: Thomas Capano: The Deadly Seducer by Ann Rule This book has something for every kind of reader, true crime, politics, superb research, psychological nuances...the list goes on and on. You’ll stay up way past your bedtime finishing this one. Florida Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh Woman decamps from her busy life and heads to Captiva Island, off the coast of Fort Myers. Woman picks up various seashells and uses them as metaphors to reflect on life: work, relationships, struggles, joys. Turns out said woman is married to a Nazi (see: New Jersey), which ruins this poetic, rhythmic philosophical missive for me. Georgia Between Georgia Torn between two families, a husband and a best friend love interest, the tension is palpable in this Southern Drama with a capital D. As one reader referenced in the Amazon reviews, the saying "We don't hide crazy in this family. We sit it down on the front porch and give it a cocktail” was just made for this book. Hawaii The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings You know a book is that good, when the George Clooney movie version doesn’t even hold a candle to it. There’s a wife in a coma and her extramarital affair, a husband forced to reckon with raising his two daughters alone and being heir to a ton of primo real estate, and so much more that will leave you unable to think about anything else for a couple of days. Idaho Idaho by Emily Ruskovich I’ll be the first to admit I picked this book up for the eye-catching floral design on the cover, but I couldn’t put it down for the pathos bleeding through every page. When a mother kills her child, so much more crumbles and is lost, but the beauty here is in all that is found, practically, philosophically, and otherwise. Illinois Searching for John Hughes by Jason Diamond When I was an editor at Men’s Journal in 2016, I sat in the cubicle next to Mr. Diamond (remember these things called offices) and this book encpatures so much of who he is: wise, writerly, idiosyncratic, and a touch grumpy. Enjoy the ride as he commences a quest for the filmmaker behind Home Alone, Sixteen Candles, and National Lampoon’s Vacation. Indiana The Fault In Our Stars by John Green I’m still crying, but to be fair, how could you not be crying after reading this novel about two kids who love like there are thousands of tomorrows despite the terminal cancer diagnoses with which they’re both reckoning. Iowa The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid by Bill Bryson 1950s-era Iowa is brought to life in this oft humorous memoir from the beloved travel writer. It really made this New York City kid feel like she was missing out on a quintessential childhood experience by never having attended a county fair. Kansas In Cold Blood by Truman Capote A true crime classic that revolves around the brutal slaying of four family members in a small town in Western Kansas and the detective work that ensues. The book was praised for utilizing novelistic techniques to describe the characters and their feelings, a trailblazer for the nonfiction genre. Kentucky Chasing Redbird by Sharon Creech Lockdowns have had me returning to tween books (don’t judge me), and I don’t regret the walk down memory lane in the least, especially in the company of the protagonist Zinny. The industrious youngster sets out into the woods and grapples with grief, blossoming love interests, and frustrating family dynamics along the way. Don’t we all? Louisiana Magic City by Yusef Komunyakaa Step inside 1950s Louisiana in Komunyakaa’s hometown of rural Bogalusa in this harrowing collection of poems. Within, the talented poet tackles racism, sexuality, and economic inequalities with a swift, vivid hand. Maine The Maine Woods by Henry Thoreau What I would give to escape this city jungle and take a walk in the Maine woods right about now. Thankfully, Thoreau’s quintessential naturalist account of three trips into the rugged woods with philosophical musings intertwined with the detailed physical descriptions of all that Thoreau witnesses. Pretty foreboding for the mid1800s: “the mission of men there seems to be, like so many busy demons, to drive the forest out of the country.” Maryland Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler Admittedly, I picked up this book because there was a tantalizing slice of pie on the cover. But I’m glad I did: Follow along for all that unfolds as one grieving Baltimore family learn about long-hidden truths and struggles to cope. Massachusetts Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom I mean, what can I say about Tuesdays with Morrie? In this blockbuster memoir-cum-biography, a journalist visits his beloved former college professor at home as he dies of ALS. A five-star book (albeit, with some four-star writing). A beautiful biography of a life well lived, and a workaholic writer who’s outlook is changed because of his inspiring teacher’s example. Michigan The Deer Camp: A Memoir of a Father, A Family, and the Land That Healed Them by Dean Kuipers It was easy to fall in love with Kuipers’ elegant prose in a story about an estranged father and his three sons and what happens when said absent dad tries to make amends after buying 100 acres of hunting property in middle-of-nowhere Michigan. It’s a memoir I know I’ll be recommending for years to come. Minnesota Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich I had picked this book up because I was supposed to gather with a crowd of hundreds to see Erdrich speak at the 92nd Street Y this past month. Needless to say, that blessed packed auditorium never came to fruition, but I’m glad I still devoured this spooky, powerful account of a pregnant woman in a world where expecting mothers are held captive in hospitals. Honorable mentions: Freedom by Jonathan Franzen; The Good Girl by Mary Kubica Mississippi The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner I did it. I read a full Faulkner book. And while I probably would have understood more about this Deep South family and Dilsey, their black servant, had I read the SparkNotes, if only for the occasional heart-stopping quote like “Clocks slay time... time is dead as long as it is being clicked off by little wheels; only when the clock stops does time come to life.” Missouri The Broken Heart of America: St. Louis and the Violent History of the United States by Walter Johnson This Missouri native and now Harvard professor captures the oft overlooked history of St. Louis, tracing the city from Lewis and Clark’s 1804 expedition to modern times, with moving examples in each chapter. It’s a tough look at racism in our country from centuries past to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson in 2014, but a look well worth taking. Montana A River Runs Through It and Other Stories by Norman Maclean So far, I’ve lost one friend to Big Sky Country since lockdowns commenced, and I can now totally appreciate why. Penned by a retired English professor who commenced his fiction career at 70, this novella and accompanying short stories will have you eager to fly-cast and play cribbage amidst a backdrop of trout streams, drunkards, and whores (maybe not the whores). Nebraska The Swan Gondola by Timothy Schaffert Venture to the 1898 Omaha World's Fair – filled with sinners and saints – as one ventriloquist stumbles upon a new love. The book has burlesque dancers, snake oil salesmen, and plenty of wild west drama and romance. In these strange times, what more could you want? Nevada Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson Like The Plot Against America (see: New Jersey) I didn’t think this stream of conscious book would be for me, so I was amazed that I polished it off in three evening reading sessions. Vegas is wild, life is wild, and it’s all gravy baby in this fast-paced (psychedelic) trip. New Hampshire Last Night in Twisted River by John Irving If this doesn’t make you want to traipse around New Hampshire (minus an accidental murder and an unfortunate sheriff), I don’t know what will. The inventive novel takes detours to Iowa, Vermont, and more, as you get to know three generations of men and a rotating cast of women and feel particularly drawn to say goodbye to your smartphone for a while and retreat to 1950s Coos County, New Hampshire. New Jersey The Plot Against America by Phillip Roth In this lengthy novel, Roth reimagines a world in which Nazi sympathizer Charles Lindbergh is President, creating fantasized historical fiction that has striking parallels to today’s dystopian America. The book focuses on Philip’s upbringing in Newark in the 1940s in a tight-knit Jewish community, with a brother desperate to leave and a cousin returning home from World War II missing a leg. Overall, this book a nice reminder for me that reading beyond your typical wheelhouse pays dividends. Check out the miniseries on HBO Max after you’re done. Honorable mention: Shore Stories: An Anthology Of The Jersey Shore by Richard Youmans (Editor) New Mexico House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday After I told a friend in California about my little project, I was touched when this book arrived in my mailbox a few days later. This Pulitzer Prize novel by esteemed Kiowa journalist moved me in all the right ways during such a time of turmoil with the unforgettable Abel, a Native American man who returns to his reservation after fighting in World War II. New York The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger In a time when it was easy to forget New York City’s boisterous splendor, it was comfort food to cavort around famed landmarks and reconvene with old Phoebs, Holden, and even pimply Ackley. As for “those ducks in that lagoon right near Central Park South,” I’m pleased to report they appear to be COVID-free and frolicking about even as hell and temperatures freeze over. Honorable mentions: A Walker in the City by Alfred Kazin; Here Is New York by E.B. White; Manhattan’45 by Jan Morris; An Unwanted Guest by Shari Lapena; The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America by Russell Shorto North Carolina Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens A haunting murder story with unforgettable characters, a moving love story, and evocative descriptions of nature’s wonders, all set in the marshlands of the Old North State. North Dakota The New Wild West: Black Gold, Fracking, and Life in a North Dakota Boomtown by Blaire Briody Part culture analysis, part travelogue, this book about the oil biz delivers on the premise of its title — especially on the wild front. Ohio Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance From page one to the end, try putting this book down as it simply yet poignantly captures the realities of growing up in a family riddled with addiction and drama. P.S. If you watched the stekkar new Netflix flick, you’ll definitely appreciate reading the original memoir. Oklahoma A Map of Tulsa by Benjamin Lytal Dubbed “a love letter to a classic American city,” this love story in a Tulsa that straddles the line between dusty and sparkling is unlike any other you’ve ever read. Oregon Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed Okay, so it also covers California and Washington, but since the author lives in Portland, we’ll give this unique, achingly beautiful memoir to her stomping grounds. Chronicling one woman’s quest to hike the PCT in the cradle of grief, this memoir will change your outlook on everything from nature to family. P.S. Reese Witherspoon stars in the 2014 movie adaptation. Pennsylvania Rabbit, Run by John Updike This was the first Updike book I read, but it won’t be the last. I think one Goodreads reviewer nailed it: “Have you ever seen something noted because it is a representation of a specific thing? For example, a building might be marked with a plaque as a perfect representation of a type of architecture. Well, this book should be marked with a plaque as a perfect prose example of America in the late 50s/early 60s.” It wasn’t pretty, it wasn’t progressive in its treatment of women, but man was it enthralling. Rhode Island The Islanders by Meg Mitchell Moore Get to know Anthony, Joy, and Lu, three strangers whose lives become intertwined on Little Rhody’s picturesque Block Island. They may call it a summer beach read, but I call it cozy quarantine perfection. South Carolina The Last Original Wife by Dorothea Benton Frank Set in Georgia and South Carolina, its a low-country love story that will leave you feeling Hallmark movie good. Also, the descriptions of towering trees, Sullivan’s Island, and Charleston restaurants, will help you indulge the armchair traveling spirit we all need right now. South Dakota Deadwood by Pete Dexter When the going gets tough, the tough head to Deadwood...at least in the 1870s if you’re Wild Bill Hickok or Calamity Jane. Expect searing grit. Booze, sex, betrayal, and murder in an action-packed work of fiction you won’t soon forget. Tennessee Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver A searing fictional narrative that grapples with the effects of climate change and draws you into the world of a young woman living on a farm in an isolated sliver of Tennessee. If you’re a lover of the mystical monarch butterflies, this is definitely for you. Texas God Save Texas: A Journey Into the Soul of the Lone Star State by Lawrence Wright Diverse chapters covering everything from hurricanes and guns to music and Texan heroes, get a taste of this big, beautiful, and oft contradictory state. (Which, by the way, is so much more than Austin) Utah Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness by Edward Abbey This best-seller reminded me of the understated, almost eerie grandeur of Utah (I once took a SUP yoga class in thermal waters within the Homestead Crater, a 10,000-year-old crater, about a half-hour outside of Park City, if that’s not enough trendy activities rolled int one) — and had me itching to return. Through Abbey’s elegiac prose, sourced from journals and reflections of his time spent as a ranger at Arches National Park outside Moab, you’ll yearn for the day when you can visit all of the natural wonders he describes for yourself, and with new eyes. Vermont Stranger in the Kingdom by Frank Mosher It’s a real treat to get lost in fictional Kingdom County, Vermont, in this tale that centers around a small town, a murder, and life in New England. Dealing with difficult themes like racism, Mosher manages to weave in humor and moral lessons without being preachy. Virginia The Jezebel Remedy by Martin Clark What happens when a married couple who are partners in law in a small Virginia town encounter a mysterious death of their most eccentric clients will leave you surprised at each twist and turn. One of my first quarantine reads last spring, it’s a veritable page-turner and welcome distraction from the relentless news cycle. Washington Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson (Spoiler alert!) The last line of this courtroom drama regarding a case of a drowned fisherman on remote San Piedro Island was well worth slogging through the entire book for me: “Accident ruled every corner of the universe except the chambers of the human heart.” West Virginia Last Mountain Dancer: Hard-Earned Lessons in Love, Loss, and Honky-Tonk Outlaw Life by Chuck Kinder This Goodreads review just about summed it up: “At turns uproariously funny and break-my-goddamn-heart sad, Last Mountain Dancer started off good and ended even better, set in a world where Hank Williams occupies the same spiritual space as the ubiquitous Jaaaaaysus.” Suffice to say, I’m looking forward to the day when I get to visit these country roads for myself. Wisconsin Population: 485 — Meeting Your Neighbors One Siren at a Time by Michael Perry I’ve visited my fair share small towns in Wisconsin like outdoorsy Door County’s fly-speck gem, Sister Bay, and Elkhorn to see the Dave Matthews Band play the much-hyped amphitheater that is Alpine Valley, but I’ve never ventured to one quite like Perry’s hometown of New Auburn, rendered beautifully in this unforgettable memoir. Wyoming Wrapped and Strapped by Lorelei James I like Harlequin romance novels, so shoot me. Hippie vegetarian meets hunky cattle farmer in a raunchy stint at the ole Split Rock Ranch and Resort in this “Blacktop Cowboys” series mass market paperback hit. Now I definitely want to visit Wyoming for the, um, scenery.

    Inspiration

    10 beautiful livestreams to brighten your day

    Enter the live stream. These videos provide a real time glimpse into a destination. And while they may not be a perfect cure for wanderlust, they do provide an instant portal to somewhere new and exciting – all without costing a penny or requiring a quarantine period! Ahead, ten live streams to enjoy while you daydream about packing your bags for real. Jackson Hole, Wyoming Visit skiers paradise from the comfort of home. Watch as visitors snap pictures under one of Jackson Town Square’s famed elk antler arches and pop in and out of shops like Jackson Trading Company. Ready to explore even more of the region? See Jackson Hole has over 50 streams featuring an elk refuge, ski slopes, an alpine slide, and more. Deerfield Beach, Florida Tranquility is transmitted via WiFi thanks to this stream of Deerfield Beach. While the view rotates among scenes of the beach, boardwalk, and skyline, the vibe captured is mostly sunny and always soothing. Listening to ocean sounds as birds call in the distance is so peaceful, it doesn’t take much imagination to convince yourself you’re actually in Florida. It is a bit like having a mini vacation in your pocket at all times. Brooks Falls, Alaska Need a boost of excitement? Try the Brooks Falls stream. You’ll be gasping at your screen as brown bears in Katmai National Park swipe their next meal out of the water. And with some bears consuming upwards of 30 fish per day, the action is endless. This stream isn’t always live, but even in the off-season, it plays highlights from past broadcasts that are well worth the watch. For your best chance to catch the action as it happens, tune in during the summer months when bears hunt from the large groups of salmon heading upstream. Banzai Pipeline, Hawaii Don’t let the sound of waves breaking on the shore fool you; this isn’t your grandma’s sound machine! The Pipeline Cam shows adrenaline-seeking surfers hanging ten on some of O’ahu’s best – and gnarliest – waves (some towering up to 30 feet!) The Pipeline’s Ehukai Beach also hosts some of the world’s most prestigious surfing competitions including the Billabong Pipe Masters. New York City It may be awhile before you get your hands on your next Levain chocolate chip walnut cookie or feel fully comfortable exploring the city by subway, but that doesn’t have to mean foregoing the excitement of New York City completely. This broadcast from St. George Tower captures The Big Apple’s iconic skyline between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges. Need even more NYC? This Times Square stream delivers the hustle and bustle straight to your screen – no dodging of those photo-loving mascots required. Duluth, Minnesota You don’t need to be a maritime enthusiast to appreciate this live stream, but stick around long enough and you just might become one. There’s something inexplicably magical about watching massive freighters – often loaded with coal and iron ore – pass through the Duluth Ship Canal as they traverse Lake Superior, serenading spectators with their horns as they go. (And shocking online viewers out of a midday slump!) Redondo Beach, California Next time you’re California dreamin,’ start streaming the City of Redondo Beach Pier camera. The view of the Pacific and lucky beachgoers will no doubt add a bit of sunshine to your day. For a different view of the town, check out the City of Redondo Beach Harbor Camera which often captures a glimpse of recreationists hitting the water by paddle board, kayak and boat. Las Vegas, Nevada Nowhere in the United States delivers on that promise of excitement (and excellent people watching!) quite like the Las Vegas Strip. This camera swivels up and down the street from its perch at the American Eagle storefront providing a birds-eye-view of the action. You’ll catch glimpses of Vegas hotels including Excalibur with its colorful medieval facade, New York-New York and its on-site roller coaster, and Paris Las Vegas with its replica Eiffel Tower. Leavenworth, Washington With panoramic mountains and charming Bavarian-inspired architecture, Leavenworth not only looks like it is in Europe, it looks straight out of a storybook! During the day, shoppers fill the streets, and in the winter, sledders fly down the hill at Front Street Park. Tune in between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day to catch a glimpse of the town all lit up for the holidays – the scene is almost as breathtaking as those mountain views. Yellowstone Gone are the days of loading up the minivan, hitting the road, paying an entrance fee, and hoping you make it to a viewing area at just the right time to see Old Faithful erupt. Now all it takes is a few clicks. Watch Old Faithful and a dozen other geysers in Yellowstone’s Upper Geyser Basin area in real time on the National Park Service website. The site also provides a handy estimate of when Old Faithful is set to erupt next so you never miss the excitement. Another perk? The park’s yummy sulfur smell can’t be transferred over WiFi... yet!

    Inspiration

    Spend the night at FAO Schwarz via Airbnb

    Airbnb is coming to the rescue for one very lucky New York City-based family to create a magical holiday season for their little ones during this strange time. For just $25 (plus taxes and fees) you can create a once-in-a-lifetime experience for your children by sleeping over at the most iconic toy store on Earth, FAO Schwarz in Manhattan. The winners will have private access to the gigantic store’s many entertaining vignettes as well as endless toys and games to play with during the overnight stay on Monday, December 21st thanks to Airbnb. New York City residents can request to book a holiday sleepover at FAO Schwarz starting on December 15th at noon EST for the chance to make your kiddos’ holiday wishes come true. Be sure to pack your most comfortable footie pajamas as you're bound to spend hours exploring the mega toy store’s many attractions during the unforgettable evening. A real-life FAO Schwarz’s toy soldier will guide you through one of the world’s oldest toy stores. There will be a larger-than-life music lesson on the store’s iconic Giant Dance On Piano, a Build-A-Bear workshop session to create a new plush holiday friend, an opportunity to build your own remote-controlled car that you can race to your heart's desire down the halls of FAO Schwarz, and a breathtaking science experiment guided by FAO Schwarz’s Professor Atlas. Of course, no trip to FAO Schwarz is complete without a shopping spree at the two-story, 20,000-square-foot toy wonderland. There are countless toys and games in every corner of the shop making it easy for Santa to pick out perfect gifts for your kids from plush teddy bears to race cars thanks to a complimentary store credit included in the package. Have fun as you shop by using your imagination to play in the store’s rocket ship and other memorable play areas. Your family will be treated to a fantastic holiday feast joined by a troupe of teddy bears, extra-large candy canes, a toy train, and a sweet winter wonderland themed table setting. Unwind in the family room and snuggle by the electric fireplace with plush toys and admire the 75-foot holiday tree glowing outside your window in Rockefeller Plaza. Parents will tuck in for the night to sleep in a sleigh bed. Kiddos will love the bunk beds complete with a slide. A gigantic red teddy bear will be there to provide comfort to your little ones, but you're all sure to dream sweetly while surrounded by so much magic. The entire evening, including the guided tour, will adhere to social distancing regulations of remaining six feet apart and everyone will wear masks in order to keep your family and staff safe. Prior to your visit, the store will be cleaned in accordance with the CDC guidelines. Should it become necessary to cancel the stay, Airbnb will offer the winner a $1,000 USD Airbnb coupon and FAO Schwarz store credit. In the holiday spirit of giving back, Airbnb will make a one-time donation to the FAO Schwarz nonprofit partner St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The National Cancer Institute is the only designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in the country devoted solely to children battling cancer. Non-NYC residents can still partake in the holiday cheer through Airbnb’s Online Experiences with FAO Schwarz including a magic lesson hosted by FAO Schwarz’s Professor Abracadabra where hopeful mystical practitioners can learn new illusion tricks. FAO Schwarz’s Professor Atlas will host a crash-course in chemistry, teaching guests how to make glow-in-in-the-dark slime at home. There will also be a holiday story read by an FAO Schwarz toy soldier. These family-friendly Airbnb Online Experiences can be booked through airbnb.com/happyholidays and enjoyed throughout the holiday season.

    Budget Travel Lists

    50 Budget-Friendly Black Friday and Cyber Monday Travel Deals

    Whether you’re planning a staycation or an epic adventure, these Black Friday and Cyber Monday travel deals will help you do it for less, with rates starting under $200 per night and most travel dates extending through 2021. Note that blackout dates apply, most properties and tour companies have flexible cancellation policies and some links won’t be active until sales begin on November 27, 2020. Vacation Packages and Guided Tours Amtrak Vacations: This year’s round of “Track Friday” specials includes savings of up to $300 per couple on National Parks Rail Vacations and up to $300 per couple on private sleeper upgrades when you book at least five nights November 26–30 and travel in 2021. Apple Vacations & FunJet Vacations: Book November 25–December 3 for travel through October 31, 2021 to save up to $175 on trips of at least two nights within the continental U.S. (use promo code BLACKFRIYAY5) or up to $500 on trips of at least three nights to Hawaii, Costa Rica, Mexico and the Caribbean (use promo code BLACKFRIYAY4). Booking.com: Make up for lost time and book hotels through the site or app now through December 1 to save at least 30% when you travel by December 31, 2021. Cheap Caribbean: Save up to 75% on trips booked through December 1 for travel through December 2021. You’ll also save $75 on trips of at least five nights (use promo code CYBER75 and travel by December 31, 2020), $150 on trips of five to six nights (use promo code CYBER150 and travel January 1–December 31, 2021) and $250 on trips of at least seven nights (use promo code CYBER250 and travel January 1–December 31, 2021). Contiki: Now through December 3, travelers ages 18–35 can save 30% on tours happening April 1, 2021–October 31, 2022. Just make a deposit during the Cyber Sale and pay off the rest of it by March 31, 2021. Expedia: Save up to 50% on hotels and attractions all over the world by booking now through December 1—plus an extra 12% if you use the Expedia app—and traveling by September 12, 2021. Friendly Planet Travel: You’ll be able to save up to $1,300 per person on more than 60 guided tours including round-trip airfare, luxury accommodations and most meals by booking November 30–December 7 with a $99 deposit. G Adventures: Save up to 21% on select trips from January 1–December 21, 2121 when you make a deposit of $1 now through November 30. Pay the full deposit amount by January 31, 2021 and the rest of your trip fees at least 60 days prior to departure (120 days ahead for Expedition tours). Intrepid Travel: Save 20% on all international trips and 10% on all domestic trips when you book now through December 1 for travel January 1–December 15, 2021. Toucan Travel: Adventure travel fans can save 35% on 12 of Toucan Travel’s most popular guided tours by booking now through December 8. Best of all, travel dates extend through 2021 and 2022 so there’s plenty of time to plan your perfect trip. Hotels in the U.S. Aparium Hotel Group: Seeking a boutique hotel staycation? Look no further than the Crossroads Hotel in Kansas City, Detroit Foundation Hotel in Michigan, Hewing Hotel in Minneapolis, Hotel Hava in Tampa, the Surety Hotel in Des Moines and the MC Hotel in Montclair, New Jersey. Receive a $50 food and beverage credit each night when you use promo code THANKS, book November 27–30 and visit by February 28, 2021. Carter Hospitality Group Winery Resorts: Save 20% at Carter’s family-owned resorts in Temecula, California, and Texas Hill Country and receive a welcome bottle of wine when you book by December 1 and stay by September 12, 2021. Hyatt: Book a stay at Hyatt’s participating properties by December 6 and get 20% off when you stay by April 4, 2021. Sign up for the World of Hyatt loyalty program, as members can save 22% and earn rewards toward future stays. Kimpton: Sign up for IHG Rewards Club, then reserve a night at one of Kimpton’s hotels now through December 7 for travel through September 7, 2021 to save 25%. Kimpton’s also donating $5 per night to No Kid Hungry, so you’ll be helping to end childhood hunger while taking a much-needed break. Wyndham Hotels & Resorts: Save 25% on stays at more than 9,000 hotels in 90 countries with this week-long mobile app flash sale starting November 24. Download the app, enroll in the Wyndham Rewards loyalty program and book at least two nights by December 1 for travel through January 18, 2021. California Paso Robles Inn: Just 3.5 hours from Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Paso Robles Inn is offering savings of 40% on stays through May 27, 2021 when you book by December 2. You’ll also save 15% on gift certificates to the hotel, its sister property The Piccolo, Terro Rooftop Bar and The Piper Wine Bar. Casa Secoya: Use promo code BLACKFRIDAY to save 25% on stays through April 1, 2021 at this charming dog-friendly abode in Monte Rio, located along the Bohemian Highway and Russian River in Sonoma County. Pacifica Hotels: Plan a California coast staycation at one of 30 independent boutique hotels—and save 45% when you book November 27–30 and travel by March 31, 2021. The Meritage Collection: Save 21% on two-night Napa Valley stays, score a $21 daily food and beverage credit and donate $21 to the First Responders Children’s Foundation when you book by December 1 and stay by April 30, 2021. Fishing: Monterey Bay is an ideal fishing spot for finding "big fish" (Western Outdoor News). Embark from Old Fisherman's Wharf with J&M Sport Fishing and save more than 30% on a fishing trip. Colorado The Curtis: Plan a staycation in Downtown Denver at this retro-chic hotel known for its hyper-themed rooms. Track down limited rates from $53 a night during its Black Friday sale, happening November 27–30. Florida El Paseo: This charming Miami-meets-Mediterranean hotel, located along Española Way in South Beach, is offering 40% off stays in 2021 when you book now through December 4. Plunge Beach Resort: Use promo code Save50 to save 50% at this chic Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resort. Just book via the website (or call 754-312-5775) by December 1, 2020 and plan to stay Sunday through Thursday in 2021. Provident Hotels & Resorts: Save 25% at Crystal Palms Suites, Oceana Beachfront Suites and Sunset Vistas Beachfront Suites in Treasure Island—located about 20 minutes from St. Petersburg and 40 minutes from Tampa—when you book November 27–December 4 for trips through December 23, 2021. Club Med: Save 60% off at amenity-packed resorts in the Caribbean, Mexico and Florida. Hawaii Kauai Beach Resort save more than $400 on regular rates and puts you in a remodeled room. Plus, with availability through June 2021, there's plenty of time to pack your bags and decide when to treat yourself to a Hawaiian escape. Massachusetts Hotel Commonwealth: Treat yourself to a staycation in Boston, with rates from $106 a night, complimentary parking and 6 p.m. check-out. Just use promo code Cyber6, book November 27–November 30 and visit by March 31, 2021. New Jersey Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa: Atlantic City lovers can save 10% and receive a $20 food and beverage credit by booking November 30–December 5 for stays through March 31, 2021. The Asbury Hotel: Head to Asbury Park on the Jersey Shore, where you’ll save 20% for one night, 30% for two nights, 40 for three nights and 50% for four nights. Use promo code MERRIER on November 27 to book stays through April 30, 2021. New York The James New York–NoMad: Save 50% on a trip to this NYC institution, located in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, by booking your stay before December 7 and visiting through December 31, 2021. The Naples Hotel: Looking for an affordable wine-filled escape to the Finger Lakes? Use promo code NHBF2020, book November 27–30 and visit by April 30, 2021 to save 25% on one night. Note that a two-night minimum stay is required for weekend trips. North Carolina The Monte Vista Hotel: Whether you want a cozy winter getaway, refreshing spring escape or an early summer trip, you'll save nearly 35%. This cozy mountain retreat is a short walk from the local shops, museums and restaurants of Black Mountain and offers easy access to the Blue Ridge Parkway Oregon LOGE Bend 45% off at the newly opened LOGE Bend. Did we mention it’s valid from ski season into early spring and weekends are also included? Rhode Island The Wayfinder Hotel: Save 30% on rooms booked November 30–December 6 when you stay by December 31, 2021. Hammetts Hotel: It’s a buy-one-get-one-free sale at Hammetts Hotel in Newport. Book your stay November 27–December 1, either by using this link or calling 401-324-7500 and visit by April 29, 2021. Gurney’s Newport Resort & Marina: Save 50% on suites and 40% on hotel rooms when you book now through December 1 and stay visit by December 30, 2021. Providence Marriott Downtown: Enjoy perks like 2 p.m. late check-out, complimentary parking and two 30-minute spa treatments at the onsite G. Salon & Spa, plus rates from $199 a night when you book November 25–December 1. Note that stays must happen Tuesday–Sunday through February 28, 2021. Texas Hilton Anatole Dallas: Save 20% on Breakfast with Santa packages, with rates from $187 per night when you book through this link from November 27–30. You’ll get 1 p.m. check-out, a special breakfast for two adults and two children with the man himself and access to other holiday events happening at the hotel. Vermont Hotel Vermont: Enjoy an escape to Burlington with rates from $159 a night when you book on November 30 for stays January 1–April 30, 2021. You’ll also receive a welcome drink at onsite restaurant Juniper, one of the best places in town to find locally sourced meals. Virginia The Alexandrian: For a fun getaway from Washington, D.C., head to nearby Alexandria, and save 20% on stays from December 3, 2020 to March 31, 2021 when you book now through November 30 via this link. Sessions Hotel: Close to the Virginia and Tennessee border in Bristol, Virginia, this stunning Marriott property is offering king rooms from $129 per night with a $25 gift card to Southern Craft, its onsite BBQ restaurant. Book “The Winter Getaway” by calling 276-285-5040 November 27–30 and staying December 1, 2020 to February 28, 2021. Lansdowne Resort & Spa: About 45 minutes from Washington, D.C. in Leesburg, Virginia, Lansdowne Resort & Spa is a great place to unwind. Save 30% on stays in 2021 with promo code BFCM when you book November 27–30. Hotels in Mexico and the Caribbean AMResorts: Save on stays at more than 60 all-inclusive hotels and resorts in the Caribbean and Mexico, with rates starting at $55 per night at Sunscape Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic, $68 per night at Sunscape Puerto Vallarta Resort & Spa and $92 per night at Dreams Tulum Resort & Spa, among a host of other offerings. While travel dates vary, most can be booked for stays through December 22, 2021. Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts: Enjoy 75% off your next all-inclusive stay in the Caribbean, Mexico or Spain when you book now through December 3 and travel by December 17, 2021. You’ll also score $1,200 worth of resort credits for four-night stays or $1,630 in resort credits for seven-night stays, which can be used toward spa treatments, room upgrades, meals, golf and other perks. Karisma Hotels & Resorts: This year’s Mystery Mexico Sale lets you save up to 80% with rates at adult-only all-inclusives in Riviera Maya and Cancún from $99 per person per night and family resorts from $129 per person per night. Book now through December 5 and travel anytime in 2021. Renaissance Curaçao: Stay in the heart of Willemstad on your next trip to Curaçao with this deal that saves you up to 20% on stays through December 21, 2021 when you book November 27–30. Jungle Bay Dominica: This deal saves you 5% and brings starting rates at the luxury wellness resort down to $203 per night when you book November 27–December 26 and travel by May 1, 2021. Saint Lucia’s Cyber Monday Sale: Save up to 60% and receive complimentary upgrades and other perks at 17 participating properties, each with its own booking and travel dates, deals, promo codes and minimum-night stay requirements. Affordable options include Bay Gardens Hotel (from $82 a night), Bay Gardens Inn (from $87 a night), Bay Gardens Marina Haven (from $92 a night), Harbor Club (from $131 a night), Windjammer Landing Villa Beach Resort (from $141 a night) and Bay Gardens Beach Resort & Spa (from $152 a night). Ocean Club Resorts: Every third night booked at this Turks and Caicos haven November 27–30 is free as long as you reserve more than two nights, travel March 1–December 18, 2021 and use promo code BFCM.

    Budget Travel Lists

    Top 7 travel destinations that have had a serious glow-up

    For many Americans, repurposing marvelous old buildings is always better than tearing them down. And while the term “urban renewal” comes with a little baggage, it’s hard to argue with its particular way of salvaging and adapting neglected older spaces for our modern world. City planners and architects across the country have found spectacular ways to reimagine vintage structures. You’ve seen it at New York City’s High Line, which converted a dilapidated Manhattan railroad into a lovely 1.5-mile “linear park.” And this year in Chicago, the gigantic, abandoned Old Post Office will open its repurposed 2.8 million square feet as a 21st-century office complex featuring a food hall, rooftop park, and restored Art Deco design. So for those travelers who appreciate the splendors of historic preservation and civic innovation, this shortlist of revitalized urban destinations is for you. 1. BeltLine, Atlanta One of the great Southern cities has circled back to its roots with adaptive-reuse projects across town – most notably along the BeltLine, itself a remarkable project. In 2005, Atlanta opened the first BeltLine section, a retired railway corridor–turned–multi-use trail that’s today lined with public art and parks. It drew more residents and businesses to the east side, and sparked the transformation of a massive old Sears distribution complex into Ponce City Market, now a dazzling mixed-use retail, dining, commercial, and residential center. Other industrial spaces along the trail have found new life too, like Inman Park’s Krog Street Market. More are sure to follow as new BeltLine sections open up in coming years, eventually spanning 33 miles. 2. Crescent Park, New Orleans Waterfronts across the country have been rediscovered in recent decades, thanks to city planners realizing the potential to replace retired wharves with versatile public space. In New Orleans, such creative thinking led to Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile linear park just east of the French Market. What once was a bustling industrial riverfront has since 2014 been a busy 20-acre green space with picnic areas, a dog run, and seasonal events and festivals. The Crescent City is seeing adaptive reuse elsewhere too, as seen across the Warehouse Arts District, at spots like the Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery, a modern hotel that prizes the building’s 19th-century heritage. In the Central Business District, Pythian Market is a locally curated food hall inside a restored 1908 tower with a fascinating tie to the city’s early civil-rights movement. 3. Discovery Green, Houston From parking lot to 12-acre park – that’s the story of Houston’s downtown Discovery Green. With the support of local philanthropy foundations, in 2002 the city seized the opportunity to convert concrete lots into an urban park with playgrounds, music stages, trails, gardens, bocce courts, restaurants, and other public amenities. The LEED-certified park now draws more than 1.2 million annual visitors, and has inspired revitalization projects across Midtown and East Downtown neighborhoods. 4. The Wharf, Washington, DC Washington’s Southwest neighborhood had for decades been a neglected corner of town, due partly to accessibility challenges caused by highways dividing it from major attractions. But that changed in 2017, when a $2 billion development transformed the industrial waterfront into the mixed-use District Wharf. The 10-acre neighborhood is now more easily accessible from the Metro (with a short walk or free shuttle), by car or cab, or by water taxi or private boat. These days, visitors from around the region flock to the Wharf that’s home to both restored historic structures and new “green” architecture – forming a year-round recreation, entertainment, and dining destination on the Washington Channel. 5. Crosstown Concourse, Memphis Old warehouses remain prized property for urban developers looking to adapt rather than build anew. Just head to the Crosstown Concourse in Memphis, where a humongous Sears store and distribution center, abandoned in 1983, became a thriving “vertical urban village” in 2017. The art deco complex that once served millions of mail-order customers now accommodates shoppers, diners, residents, and workers across its 1.2 million sq ft. It’s even home to a charter high school, medical clinics, a YMCA, and a contemporary arts organization with galleries and performance space. (Memphis is one of several US cities that have reused retired Sears complexes. You’ll find similar projects in Minneapolis, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Boston.) 6. Downtown Project, Las Vegas Not so much a single project as an evolving investment, Las Vegas’s Downtown Project is the city’s ongoing urban-revitalization initiative in its historic Fremont East/East Village districts. Driven (and financed) by Zappos founder Tony Hsieh, who parked the company headquarters there in 2013, the Downtown Project has poured $350 million into the neighborhood’s 61 acres. Today, Vegas visitors, workers, and residents enjoy new (and newly supported) businesses along the established street grid – from restaurants and bars, to arts spaces and boutiques, all complemented by award-winning urban design and public art. Befitting a project led by an online retail giant, the project’s Container Park houses nearly 40 businesses in repurposed shipping containers. 7. The Steel Yard, Providence The industrial character of Providence’s Valley neighborhood turned out to be a perfect setting for a vibrant urban arts studio. In 2002, the Steel Yard took over the century-old Providence Steel and Iron building just a year after it shuttered. Since then, all 12,000 sq ft have served as nonprofit workspaces for ceramics, woodwork, welding, blacksmith, and jewelry creators on the banks of the Woonasquatucket River. The Steel Yard reopened a refreshed space last year, and along the way it’s inspired other proprietors to make use of Valley’s lofty, leftover brick complexes, including the “elevated street casual” eatery Troop. Look for more action in this area over coming years, as city planners develop a linear park called Woonasquatucket River Corridor linking Downtown Providence to Valley in the coming years.

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