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Readers' best wildlife photos

By Sean O'Neill
updated September 29, 2021
blog_100107_readerswildlife_pano_original.jpg
Courtesy <a href="http://mybt.budgettravel.com/_Costa-Rican-Beauty/photo/6781581/21864.html">Buqo/myBudgetTravel</a>

This may be the best "Readers' Best" slide show to date. From over 1,000 submissions, we picked 20 outstanding photos—including a fabulous Florida flamingo, gorgeous butterflies in Japan, and regal-looking penguins in the Falkland Islands.

Check out the images in our slide show.

RECENT READER SLIDE SHOWS

Rainbows | Hawaii | National Parks

STILL IN SEARCH OF…

We're now collecting your photos of Mexico. Upload them through myBudgetTravel, tag them, and check back in the coming weeks for slide shows of the best submissions.

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