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Spring Flights From Under $100!

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello
January 27, 2022
Lonely Planet - Los Angeles, California, United States of America
Lonely Planet

Our friends at Southwest are offering some pretty amazing airfares for winter and spring travel through May, but you have to act now: The sale ends as the ball drops on New Year’s Eve.

Book through this Thursday, December 31, to lock in travel in the U.S. through May 25, with travel to/from San Juan, Puerto Rico, slightly more limited to dates from mid-January to early March and late March to May 25.

Some of the deals on one-way flights that especially caught our eye include:

* Denver to Los Angeles from $94
* NYC to Nashville from $118
* Chicago to Ft. Lauderdale from $134

This sale can nab you a bargain even if you’ve already purchased a Southwest ticket for these travel dates: Visit change air reservation to check for a lower fare.

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Inspiration

5 Underrated European Countries You Should Visit Now

By Meagen Collins for Yahoo Travel It’s 2016 and many of you will most likely be making those two big New Year’s resolutions: 1. Lose weight and 2. Travel more!  Well, we are here to help you with the second one.  Not only are we going to inspire you to travel more, but we want to inspire you to outdo your friends this year and discover some of the best off-the-beaten-path European destinations. And guess what? They all are stunningly beautiful — and they’re super affordable too! Score! These unexpected European destinations will give you a serious case of wanderlust, and will have you packing your bags, booking a flight, and discovering the great unknown this year.   1. Kosovo Kosovo, in particular the city of Prizren, is our new favorite spot in Europe. When we were there in November, winter was approaching and the days were becoming colder. But even so, the people were still out enjoying the limited hours of sunshine they had every single day. We discovered locals drinking coffee in the numerous coffee shops around town, restaurants full every night, and bars offering cheap drinks and a chilled atmosphere. A must-see is the view from the Kalaja Fortress.  If it’s a nice day bring a picnic and hang out with the locals, many of whom are happy to chat with foreigners. What to eat: Try pljeskavica, grilled meat stuffed with cheese. We had this dish at Te Syla restaurant and it is seriously the best in town — so good we went back the next day and had it again! The prices is less than five dollars, and many restaurants serve it with salad and fries. Fun fact: Kosovo is the youngest country of the 21st century. It officially declared independence from Serbia on February 17, 2008. Related: The Best Value European Destination You’ve Never Heard Of 2. Albania We visited Tirana and Shkodra, but the coastal towns of the ‘Albanian Riviera’ are a popular place to visit during the warmer months. This country is jam-packed with so much natural beauty it would be a shame to leave it off any European trip. The people are all welcoming, and go above and beyond to help any foreigners in need of assistance. What to eat: Veal appears to be the specialty of Albania — or 'the baby cow’ as it is usually described. We recommend giving the Albanian pilaf a try, rice cooked in seasoned broth. It usually costs around $1 for a small serving. Fun fact: Albania, Armenia, Macedonia, and Vatican City are the only European countries without a McDonald’s branch. 3. Republic of Macedonia The first thing to realize is that there are two Macedonias in Europe. In fact they are side by side. One is the the Republic of Macedonia (sometimes called the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia or FYROM), and the other is a region of Greece. It’s best not to get these mixed up — otherwise you might encounter some rather upset locals.  We visited the capital of the Republic of Macedonia, Skopje, and though it is a city under construction, it’s still beautiful to visit. It’s going to be incredible once it’s finished. You can wander the streets admiring the architecture and art bridges, or head into the Old Bazaar or Bit Pazar area to get a taste of the local market scene. What to eat: Make sure you try pastrmajlija — this is a fried dough pie that is covered with salted and cubed meat pieces and sometimes cheese or egg. Often you’ll get a couple so chili peppers on top as well. The dish is so tasty there’s even a festival for it every fall. A small serving cost around $3 and fed both of us! Fun fact: Of all the Yugoslav territories, Macedonia is the only one that gained independence peacefully. Related: The Cheapest Places in Europe for Just About Anything 4. Montenegro One of the fastest growing tourist destinations in the Balkans, Montenegro offers beautiful coastlines, stunning mountains, and historic old towns to explore. Whilst not as cheap as some other Balkan destinations, you can certainly still get some bang for your buck if you go about it the right way. In the summer months prices go through the roof, but come during the off season and prices of accommodation can sometimes be negotiated. What to eat: Seafood, especially squid known as lignje, is popular in Montenegro. Due to its positioning there is also a lot of Italian influence in local cooking, with Turkish coming in a close second place. The cuisine also revolves around fresh produce including olive oil, olives, and cheese — all of which are divine. Fun fact: Montenegro features in the James Bond movie Casino Royale — but in name only. Bond supposedly bullet trains to the small European country and then joins a high-stakes poker tournament at a hotel there. But the filming was actually done in the Czech Republic. Related: The World is Not Enough: How to Travel Like James Bond 5. Romania We spent close to four months living in Bucharest in 2015, and we fell in love. The people are friendly, the countryside is captivating, and it doesn’t hurt that the cost of living is quite reasonable. Plus, being able to say you’ve visited Dracula’s castle will make you instantly cool with your friends — trust us. What to eat: When heading out for a meal in Romania know this: You will never leave the restaurant hungry. Romanian food is incredible, and the portion sizes are insane.  Make sure you try the grilled minced-meat rolls called mititei (meaning “small ones”). We also liked sarmale, which is minced meat with rice wrapped in either pickled cabbage leaves or vine leaves; it’s served with a few slices of ham or bacon and a nice big helping of polenta. For dessert, order papanasi, a boiled/fried donut of sorts that’s been smothered in jam and cream — heavenly. Fun fact: In 1889 the Romanian city of Timisoara became the first in Europe to have electric street lighting. So there you have it, Europe’s best off-the-beaten-path destinations to visit in 2016. I recommend adding these countries to your itinerary straight away, and as soon as possible too — they won’t be quite so 'unvisited’ in the coming years. 

Inspiration

Have You Taken Our "Where Should You Go in 2016" Quiz?

We knew that our Where Should You Go in 2016 Quiz would be a hit with Budget Travel readers, but we were also psyched that the quiz (which determines your "travel personality" then matches you to one of our top 2016 destinations) is such a hit with our own staff: We’ve all been having a blast taking the quiz, comparing the revealing results (I was pleasantly surprised by my result!), and sharing with our friends and colleagues on social media. Here, a quick look at where our Where Should You Go in 2016 Quiz says we should be going in 2016. How about you? ICELAND, our No. 1 “Where to Go in 2016” destination pick, was recommended to BT’s Photo Editor Whitney Tressel (“My best friend is getting married and I want to plan her bachelorette party in Iceland!”), Media Relations Representative Amy Mironov (“It’s on my bucket list!”) and Digital Project Manager Ruthie Kaposi (“I’ve always wanted to visit its otherworldly landscapes.”). By the way, don’t forget to enter for a chance to win a trip to Iceland! CUBA was my personal quiz result, and, as Editor in Chief (not to mention a Cold War baby), I have to admit that just being able to wholeheartedly recommend this gorgeous, once-forbidden island as a potential travel destination for Americans is a dream come true. Plus, I’ve been repeatedly watching our brand-new exclusive Cuba video and counting the days till I can get there in person. PORTUGAL resonated with a bunch of BT staffers, including President, Publisher Elaine Alimonti (“It’s the choice for foodies like me!”), Advertising Manager Maureen Kelley Stewart (“My husband and I were in Lisbon for 48 hours in 2014 and can’t wait to get back there!”), and Marketing Manager Rosalie Tinelli (“It’s a part of Europe I’ve always wanted to see, and I’m ready for some new and exciting food and wine!”). MARTINIQUE is where the quiz says Senior Editor Jamie Beckman should be headed (“Perfect because not only do I enjoy Caribbean beaches, I also enjoy French wine and cheese. Total win-win!”). GREECE was a nice match for Creative Director Chalkley Calderwood (“I have wanted to go for years and this is a sign that it has to move to No. 1 on my bucket list.”). ISLA HOLBOX, a Mexican dream trip, is apparently perfect for photo director Amy Lundeen (“It’s been on my travel list for years!”) and Lead Developer Chad Harter (“I’m pretty much always looking for a beach vacation.”). SAN ANTONIO is a good fit for Director, Business Development Michelle Craig (“I am a huge fan of culture and history. I hear the River Walk is awesome for a fun-filled evening.”).

Inspiration

Wanna Fly to Havana?

We're still pinching ourselves that travel to Cuba is getting easier and easier, and many of us have rewritten our bucket list with a dream trip to Havana, with its vibrant music scene, great cuisine, and iconic Spanish Colonial architecture and vintage cars, near the top. In fact, Cuba is no. 3 on Budget Travel’s Where to Go in 2016 list. So we were pleased to learn that JetBlue, partnering with Cuba Travel Services, is now offering two charter flights connecting New York and Havana with nonstop service each week. The second weekly flight, departing each Tuesday, was added in response to the U.S. government further easing restrictions so that approved travelers can now travel to Cuba with close relatives. Travelers can now choose between Tuesday flights and Friday flights from JFK to Havana’s Jose Marti International Airport (HAV), bringing the once-off-limits Caribbean island even closer to many more Americans. We’ve been reporting for months about what the future of travel to Cuba may look like, including expanded people-to-people tours and even ferry service from the Florida Keys, but JetBlue is actually serving Americans who want to be among the first to get there. When you’re ready to fly to Cuba from JFK (after meeting the current U.S. guidelines and getting approval), you can book your flight at CubaTravelServices.com (Cuba Travel Services selected JetBlue to operate its charter flights). JetBlue also partners with charter airlines out of Ft. Lauderdale and Tampa, operating on 150-seat Airbus A320s, offering free Wi-Fi, inflight entertainment, free snacks and soft drinks, and the comfy legroom JetBlue passengers have come to expect. "More people are exploring the possibility of travel to Cuba with government restrictions easing this year, and we are happy to accommodate that growing demand," said Scott Laurence, senior vice president airline planning at JetBlue. "We thank Cuba Travel Services for trusting us to serve Cuba-bound customers with the JetBlue's award-winning experience on their way to Havana." "Cuba Travel Services is excited for all the positive changes allowing more Americans to visit Cuba. We are offering more flexibility to our travelers and introducing our new online booking engine at CubaTravelServices.com, which will allow passengers to reserve and purchase their tickets in real time," said Michael Zuccato, General Manager at Cuba Travel Services. "Our partnership with JetBlue will facilitate the high quality travel experience our clients have grown accustomed to."

Inspiration

Confessions of a Sommelier

Guillem Kerambrun, beverage director of the New York City bistro Benoit by Alain Ducasse, uncorks wine-ordering tips, secrets of the trade, and advice for nabbing yourself a bargain bottle. Q: How did you first get interested in wine? A: Even as a little boy in France, I was paying atten­tion to beverages. There was an orange juice I didn't like and another I did like because it was balanced, not too sweet, and had some pulp. My father, a true epicurean, instilled my love of wine. When I was 15, a profes­sor at hotel management school helped me hone my knowledge and skills. Q: What are the perfect food and wine pairings? A: There is no perfect food and wine pairing. Some diners like to accentuate the acidi­ty or bitterness, while others like to balance the two. The role of the sommelier is to find the bottle that will speak to everyone's palate at the table. We have to cap­ture the moment while taking everyone's tastes and moods into account because, just like coffee, we don't always want the same thing.READ: "Eat and Drink Your Way Through Louisville's Urban Bourbon Trail" Q: What great wines do you drink at home? A: I don't regularly drink premier grands cru classés, but instead I try to select something new at my local wine shop. It's part of continuing to learn. Q: What are some unexpected challenges in your line of work? A: When I'm invit­ed to a private dinner, the hosts are sometimes overly stressed about whether the wines they are pouring will impress me. I always let them know that I'm not always drink­ing wine as a profession­al. I sometimes like to dis­connect and enjoy wine in a leisurely manner. Q: Some people are very nervous about ordering wine. Any tips? A: People with lim­ited wine knowl­edge can start by telling me what they like to drink at home, and their price range. Anoth­er factor is whether the context of the meal is to impress, with an unbeat­able Bordeaux like Pessac-Léognan or Pierre Seillan's Vérité Sonoma wines, or in leisure mode with friends looking to discover small "star" wines like a Riesling from the Finger Lakes or a Provençal rosé.READ: "13 Amazing American Food Festivals" Q: Do you have a favorite cheap wine? A: One always compares the quality of the drinking experience to the price. I won't name names for fear that my supplier will increase prices with the next vintage, but there are some affordable and superb côtes du rhône wines that I'm really enjoying, one of which I will offer by the glass at Benoit next month.

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