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4 reasons why you should travel to the Bahamas this winter

By Becca Blond
January 9, 2020
Nassau Bahamas
©Peter Sitterli/500px

Hurricane Dorian was the worst tropical storm to strike the Bahamas in the country's history. The effects of the storm, from severe wind damage to flooding, left scars on the archipelago that will take years to heal, but the Bahamas is on the rebound and ready to see visitors again.

Traveling to the Bahamas this winter is not only more affordable than usual, but visiting this season also directly helps a community working hard to resume life after Hurricane Dorian’s devastating destruction. Here are the top four reasons you should visit this Caribbean archipelago this winter.

1. You can give back on Grand Bahama

Hurricane Dorian caused catastrophic damage on Grand Bahama, but today the island is largely up and running and ready to accept visitors.

Grand Bahamas is a great destination for travelers who want to give back. The dog- and cat-loving world rallied around the Humane Society of Grand Bahama during and after Hurricane Dorian. Six shelter workers and one volunteer rode out the storm inside the shelter until it flooded and their own lives were put in danger (they had to swim out to safety). But by staying so long, they saved the lives of many animals who would have otherwise perished (sadly, many still did).

The animal shelter itself was severely damaged, but thanks to a global fundraising effort is slowing start to re-build. They are happy for volunteer help with the animals — you can take a dog or two for an outing or socialize at the shelter with the cats. The shelter welcomes volunteers 11am-2pm Monday to Saturday. Many of the shelter’s staff lost everything in the storm, and donations of new or lightly used clothing are also welcome.

How to get there: The airport in Freeport has re-opened and there are flights on BahamasAir and Silver Airways to and from Fort Lauderdale most days of the week. The ferry between Freeport and Fort Lauderdale is also operating again, as is the cruise port. Many of the hotels and restaurants have opened their doors again.

Where to stay: Many of Grand Bahama’s hotels have re-opened, including the all-inclusive Viva Wyndham Fortuna, which saw major renovations post Dorian. Rates are also down about 25% and the property is located on a pretty stretch of sand on the island’s south shore. Other lodging options include Pelican Bay, Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan, Bell Channel Inn and Castaways Best Western.

2. Experience Bimini blue on a budget

As a result of the hurricane, hotel prices across the islands have fallen in an effort to draw in visitors. As such, now is a great time to visit some of the more traditionally expensive Out Islands, like beautiful Bimini.

The water around Bimini is so well known, it has its own color named after it: Bimini blue. It's the kind of place where life still moves slowly and locals get around by golf cart. Bimini was also once a favorite retreat for Ernest Hemingway, who came to write and indulge in his other passion, sport fishing, which is something else Bimini is known for.

How to get there: Bimini is the closest Bahamas island to the mainland US and is easy to access from Miami via airplane or a high-speed ferry service that makes the trip in just two hours. If you fly, you’ll arrive on South Bimini. Most of the accommodation is on North Bimini, which is just a short ferry ride away.

Where to eat: At the end of the day head to the Bimini Big Game Club Resort & Marina for a cold beer and fish sandwich at Sharky’s Bar & Grill. Located right by the pier overlooking the marina and the bonefish flats beyond, you can often see massive bull sharks swimming in the water just in front of the restaurant. You can also stay here, although the resort is definitely geared towards anglers.

Where to stay: Here you’ll find the Hilton at Resorts World Bimini is the island’s only large resort and offers some great deals, especially if you stay mid-week when the vibe is much more laidback anyway. On the weekends the property has a party vibe when Floridians pop over on the ferry from Miami. The resort features luxe suites with floor-to-ceiling windows and amenities like a rooftop swimming pool, live action casino and 10 restaurants, bars and cafes. The property can also arrange day trips that include snorkeling in and around a partially submerged shipwreck (an old rum runner known as the SS Sapona).

3. Nassau is easy to get to

Nassau is the capital of the Bahamas and actually located on New Providence Island, but everyone seems to refer to the area as Nassau. At first glance, with its throngs of cruise ship passengers, careening jitneys and vendors selling straw-goods, Nassau might not be the Caribbean escape many are looking for. But that urban bustle is exactly why we love it: it's been been a hustler hideout since 18th-century pirates were dropping their doubloons on rum and excitement. If you're looking for a classic Bahamian beach, look no further than Cable Beach, just three miles from downtown Nassau.

How to get there: Nassau is the easiest island in the Bahamas to access from the mainland US with direct flights on multiple airlines. Outbound US travelers get to clear US Customs and Immigration on the ground in Nassau, which eliminates having to go through customs and border control in their arrival city.

Where to stay: If you’re looking for an all-inclusive property with good food on a lovely stretch of white sand on Cable Beach then check into the Melia Nassau Beach - All Inclusive. Part of the Baha Mar development, the resort has ocean facing rooms and suites to choose from as well as 7 restaurants and 4 bars onsite.

4. Cat Island is still pristine, undeveloped Bahamas

As an antidote to the hubub of Nassau, Cat Island sits in the Caribbean relatively untouched by tourism. Another of the Bahamas' Out Islands, Cat Island, located some 130 miles southeast of Nassau, is still mostly undeveloped and known as one of the more budget-friendly islands. Derelict plantation ruins dot the islands, and the Hermitage atop Mt Alvernia forms the main historic site. Elsewhere, beaches are blissfully free of big-name resorts.

How to get there: There are two airports on Cat Island, Arthur's Town Airport and New Bight Airport, which serve chartered and scheduled flights. There is also a mailboat service from Nassau to points around the island but it only runs weekly.

Where to stay: Check out the Pigeon Cay Beach Club, which has just 11 cottages right on a gorgeous three mile long white sand beach and a shabby chic hippie vibe. It isn’t fancy, but they do have WiFi now. Breakfast and dinner are served at the honor bar and you can also cook in your cottage’s kitchen. Explore the island by bike, canoe or kayak, which are all on offer to guests.

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Inspiration

​How to ski Colorado on $200 per day (or less)

Colorado's slopes aren't just for the upper crust. There are plenty of resorts across this Rocky Mountain playground that let you experience the bluebird powder days, diversity of runs and vertical drop that the region is known for – all without ponying up nearly as much cash. Here we spill the tea on three Colorado resorts where you can ski, stay and eat for around $200 per person per day – you will eat better at some than others. Consider the Gems Card Depending on whether you are local or not and how much you plan to ski, one of the best deals for discounts is the Colorado Gems Card. The card costs $30 and works at 11 of the lesser-known ski resorts across the state (including the three listed here) providing either two for the price of one adult full-day lift ticket (must be used on the same day) or 30% off the price of a single adult full-day lift ticket. The card can be used at each of the resorts twice during the season and must be purchased before February 28, 2020. Our favorite budget Colorado ski resorts Monarch Mountain Lift Ticket: $64 to $84Accommodation: $50 to $75 per personLeftover for Food: between $41 and $86 Just outside Salida, Colorado, Monarch Mountain is proudly independently owned and known for its abundance of natural snow and affordable lift tickets. Monarch allows you to purchase lift tickets online for 40% less than what you would pay at the ticket window. Monarch’s ticket prices vary depending on the month and whether you are skiing a weekend or weekday, but for a weekday in January a 1-Day Adult Lift ticket is as low as $64 – compare this to Vail and Beaver Creek Resorts, which are the state’s most expensive at $209 for a single day. The most you’ll pay when purchasing online at Monarch is $84 per day. And if you have two people it may be cheaper to purchase the Gem Card and get the 2-for-1 special. Monarch also offers free parking at its base and a variety of terrain to offer something for all levels of riders. There is just one base area, but there is enough diversity to ski for a few days without getting bored on a total of 66 trails with 1162ft of vertical drop. For lodging, you’ll head to the town of Salida, just 30 minutes away. This atmospheric mountain town has a number of hotels with room rates averaging around $150 per night for a double with all taxes and fees, so $75 per person. If you book an Airbnb you can bring that cost down to around $50 per person on the cheaper end. After lodging and lift tickets, you’ll have around $50 to $75 left per person to spend on food. Monarch has a number of restaurants on mountain and as long as you choose your entrees carefully you should be able to afford to eat lunch here and still stay within budget. For dinner, Salida has a number of affordable restaurants including Currents and Amicas Pizza. Eldora Mountain Resort Lift Ticket: $75 - $129 (with Gem Card from $64.50)Accommodation: from $42Remaining Food Budget: between $29 and $94 This is a resort where the $30 purchase of the Gem Card really counts. If you’re skiing as a duo, you’ll pay $80 per person for the first day (factoring in the cost of the card) and then just $64.50 for the second day. Just 21 miles from Boulder and 47 miles from Denver, Eldora Mountain Resort is one of the most accessible ski resorts in the state — you can ride a city bus from Denver or Boulder to get here, which makes is super convenient and affordable from a transportation perspective. The mountain has 680 acres of skiable terrain for all levels including challenging runs on Corona Bowl and a great area for beginners. There are also two terrain parks to play in. If you plan to ski four days, then buy the Eldora 4-Pass online for $299, which breaks down to just $75 per day. It doesn’t need to be used consecutively, so if you live in Colorado and want to just ski a day at a time it also makes sense. A single day adult lift ticket at the window costs $129. For apres-ski, Boulder is a fun college town filled with restaurants and nightlife. It also has a number of affordable Airbnb options with rates as low as $42 per person per night in late January. As long as you have the Gem Card, this will leave you with nearly $100 a day to spend on food. You will be able to eat on mountain for lunch and also grab dinner a few drinks at a mid-range Boulder restaurant. Favorites include Rincón Argentino for Argentinian in a low-key setting and the Rayback Collective, a food truck park where you can cozy up to the outdoor fire pit. Arapahoe Basin Lift Ticket: around $53 to $77Accommodation: from $75Remaining Food Budget: $48 to $72 Just 68 miles west of Denver and right on the Continental Divide at an elevation of X, Arapahoe Basin Ski Area boasts the longest ski and ride season in Colorado and some seriously sizzling lift ticket deals when purchased online in advance. Depending on what day you plan to ski – mid-week is always cheaper – we saw ticket prices in January for as low as $53 for an adult full-day. On the higher side, an advance purchase lift ticket was $77. A-Basin is also part of the Gem program, so should you get stuck paying full price for a last minute lift ticket, you can still get the 2-for-1 deal here. The resort is known for its rocky steeps and chutes including 468 acres of new lift-serviced intermediate and expert terrain at The Beavers, but it also has some wide open, rolling groomers that are perfect for beginners. A long time locals favorite – it’s nickname is “The Legend,” A-Basin has a fun vibe and food and drinks on the mountain are affordable for Summit County. The resort is also famous for its parking lot scene around The Beach – the part of the lot that backs up to the lower mountain chairlifts. Reminiscent of a football tailgating party, expect music, dogs, brews and full-on cookouts. For lodging, prices are definitely a bit higher as you are in the heart of Summit County, which is home to mega resorts like Breckenridge and Keystone. There are a number of small towns that service all these resorts including Frisco, Dillon and Silverthorne. Hotels start at about $125 per person per night, but Airbnbs can go for around $75 per person per night. All of these towns have fast casual or straight up fast food dining options as well as affordable restaurants and some good craft breweries that also serve food.

Inspiration

5 Ski Resorts Under an Hour from Major Airports

That first moment standing atop a mountain, goggles clear and skis waxed, can be the ultimate winter bliss. But there’s a whole lot of transportation leading up to that snowy perch. Not to mention travel pitfalls like long drives in rough weather, missed air connections, and baggage claim snafus. Luckily, several of the country’s best summits aren’t far from major runways, where you can find yourself schussing from plane to slope in no time. Check out these prime ski resorts, all within an hour’s drive from well-served international and regional airports. 1. Solitude Mountain Resort, Utah From Salt Lake International Airport (SLC), skiers and boarders will love the bevy of world-class mountains all within a tight 60. (They don’t call this town “Ski City” for nothing!) Even better, SLC is a major hub for Delta Airlines, and serves nearly a dozen more carriers big and small – including United, Southwest, Alaska, jetBlue, Frontier, KLM, American, and other airlines. You don’t have to ski to recognize some of the area’s famous winter destinations, like Park City, Deer Valley, Alta, and Snowbird. But head to Big Cottonwood Canyon to check out Solitude Mountain Resort, home to eight chairlifts, 80 runs, three bowls, and 500 annual inches of snow. Historic Solitude has been going strong since 1957, and now encompasses 1,200 acres; condos and townhomes; plus a Bavarian ski-in/ski-out lodge with heated outdoor pool and hot tub, spa, and easy access to shops, bars, and restaurants. Don’t miss the special dining experience of trekking via snowshoe to The Yurt, where chefs serve a four-course dinner inside a Mongolian yurt in the forest. 2. Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Fly into Nevada’s Reno-Tahoe International Airport (RNO), drive southwest about 55 minutes into California, and find yourself at one of America’s largest ski resorts. Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is home to 42 total lifts, and 270 trails across 6000 acres – plus a Scenic Aerial Tram that climbs 2000ft high to an altitude of 8200ft, yielding magnificent mountain and Lake-Tahoe panoramas. Known for its lengthy ski and snowboard season and daily sunshine, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows earned fame when it served as the host site of the entire 1960 Winter Olympics. 3. Stowe Mountain Resort, Vermont Vermont may be small, but Burlington International Airport (BTV) stays busy year-round, thanks to direct flights from about a dozen cities on a variety of airlines. From there, access to slopes around Mount Mansfield is a cool 55 minutes, either to Smugglers’ Notch, or luxurious Stowe Mountain Resort. Stowe stands out for its 11 lifts and a sightseeing gondola, which take riders up to Vermont’s highest peak (Mt. Mansfield) and sister mountain Spruce Peak. The base lodge anchors Stowe’s New England–village vibes, complete with spa, performing arts hall, ice skating, and an indoor rock-climbing center. 4. Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Wyoming The only airport within a national park, Jackson Hole Airport (JAC) is just 21 miles/35 minutes from Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. And what spectacular site for each, boasting views of the Teton Mountains in the south end of Yellowstone National Park. Skiers, boarders, and other winter-sports fanatics may find a bit of frosty heaven here. There are 17 lifts and 130 runs over 2500 skiable acres and 3000 backcountry acres; plus loads of other sports and leisure activities on the slopes and in posh downtown Jackson Hole. Easy access comes year-round, with directs on several airlines from a dozen major cities into its regional airport. 5. Aspen Snowmass, Colorado So you want a quick ride from the airport to the slopes? Central Colorado’s Aspen/Pitkin County Airport (ASE) may have them all beat with a speedy seven-mile, 15-minute drive to Colorado’s Snowmass Village. True, Apsen/Pitkin is a smaller regional airport, but nonstop service from major US hubs make it an easy port even in winter. (You also can opt for the Eagle County Regional Airport (EGE), about 80 minutes north, which also serves Vail and Beaver Creek mountain villages). Among the more vibrant Rocky Mountain resorts, Aspen Snowmass is a sprawling resort that draws skier, boarders, and other snow lovers from around the world. From its prime location in Snowmass Village, the resort offers 40 lifts and more than 330 runs over 5,300 acres, plus access to a town rich with events, dining, and nightlife.

Inspiration

Take a Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Tour at These Real-Life Locales

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the hit show from Amazon Prime Video, not only fueled nostalgia for 1950s New York City, it brought us to vintage Paris streets and summers in the Catskills. Now, with the premier of season 3, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is taking her show on the road. Want to follow along? Here are some of the key locations you can visit right now from the Maisel universe. The Gaslight Cafe – NYC For her first comedy set, Mrs. Maisel drunkenly stumbles into the cellar of a West Village comedy club and speakeasy she frequented with her philandering husband. And though there was a bar called The Gaslight in the Meat Packing district which recently closed after 21 years, the Gaslight Cafe at 116 MacDougal St. was shuttered in 1971. An underground home for creativity of all types, it hosted the likes of Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan, who recorded a live album there in 1962. The interior shots were filmed inside a studio in Brooklyn, but you can visit the exteriors at 97 St Mark’s Place in the East Village. Old Town Bar – NYC This Flatiron gem, Joel Maisel’s favorite hangout, is one of the oldest bars in the city and serves one heck of a cheeseburger to boot. If the prohibition-era marble-topped bar could talk, it might decide to take the fifth, but the vintage restrooms kind of say it all. An eclectic crowd of tried and true New Yorkers mingle with tourists and everyone enjoys watching the waiters serving food delivered on the dumbwaiter. See it at 45 E. 18th St. The Maisel Apartment – NYC The Upper West Side is Midge’s playground, and her parents’ opulent Manhattan apartment is filmed inside The Strathmore at 404 Riverside Drive, Apt 3N, overlooking the Hudson River. The building itself dates to 1909, is constructed of brick, limestone and terra cotta, and is located in Morningside Heights, closer to Columbia University (where Marion’s father, Abe, teaches) than the Museum of Natural History. B. Altman – NYC When Midge decides to make her own cash so she can spend nights killing it on the mic, she gets a job at this classic, now defunct, department store. The original, landmarked, building still stands nearly unchanged at 65 Fifth Avenue, though it’s now the Graduate Center for the City University of New York. Pop around the corner to the 34th St. entrance to witness the show’s exact shot, but sadly, you won’t be able to purchase any lipstick. The inside scenes were shot inside the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, a former bank in Brooklyn. Chez Paul – Paris When Mrs. Maisel and her father hoof it to Paris to convince Rose Weissman to come back to New York, they take a family meal in this sweet bistro at 13 rue de Charonne, Bastille in the eleventh arrondissement. The romantic, turn-of-the-century décor and checkered tablecloths highlight the classic French menu, like the perfectly cooked steak au poivre, gratin dauphinois, and of course the steak tartar - which sadly goes uneaten in the scene. Madame Arthur – Paris After wandering the City of Lights, Midge stumbles into this drag cabaret, which is exactly what it is in real life. Located at 75bis rue des Martyrs, 18th arrondissement, Madame Arthur has hosted bohemian luminaries such as Pablo Picasso and Toulouse-Lautrec and now presents upscale drag shows in two different theaters every night. After the cabarets, the space turns into a club which stays open until 6am. Steiner Resort – the Catskills Back from Paris and ready for some relaxation, the Weissmans and the Maisels head to the Catskills — with manager Susie not far behind. Just a few hours drive from Manhattan, this New York State mountain range was labeled the Borscht Belt and hosted a certain pair of dirty dancers back in the day. Scott’s Family Resort, on Oquaga Lake, stood in for Steiner Resort and still offers access to the same summer cottages, ballroom and even bowling alley that the gang frolicked in onscreen. Plunger and romper not included. The Rockaways – Queens When Susie is kidnapped for cash by two mobsters, they drag her kicking and kind of screaming to the Rockaways, a NYC beach area in Queens known for its surfing, tacos and cheap beer. Of course, everything turns out OK on the subway ride, once the goons realize Susie also grew up there. You can follow in their footsteps by catching the A, J or Z trains to Rockaway Boulevard, or hopping on a NYC Ferry to Rockaway Landing. The Cedar Tavern – NYC When Midge starts dating the handsome bachelor, Benjamin, she is sucked into the New York art scene when they visit this dive bar. Known for its weekly salon for artists, The Cedar Tavern moved twice since it opened in 1866 and shuttered for good in 2006. The scene was actually filmed in McSorley’s, a similarly old-timey bar at 15 E 7th St. near University Place. Here you can toss peanut shells on the floor and order sloppily poured mugs of just two types of beer, light and dark. Sadly, if this were really where the two lovebirds came to mingle, they would never have made it inside – McSorley’s didn’t allow women until 1970. Miami Beach – Miami We haven’t had a ton of spoilers for season 3, but we do know that Susie and Midge head to Miami and have the pleasure of staying at the horseshoe-shaped Fountainebleau. A beachfront resort built in 1954 with a massive pool, Versailles-like gardens and swinging scene, it was luxury incarnate and favored by celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Judy Garland and even Elvis, and still enjoys a retro, sherbet-colored vibe today. Its Mid-Beach location has become more popular with the opening of other high-end resorts like the Soho Beach House and The Confidante. Las Vegas Other than the occasional crumb dropped by producers on Instagram, we don’t know much about the locations in Vegas, but we do know This Is Us star Sterling K. Brown joins the crew as a straight-talking manager and we do see some marquees mocked up with Maisel. Other than that, you’re just going to have to tune in on December 6th to find out if what happens in Vegas…well, you know the rest.

Inspiration

Where to Travel for the Best Canadian Wine

Despite its chilly reputation, Canadian wine has been winning awards and making a name for itself for years. That includes chardonnay from Prince Edward County, appellation wine in Nova Scotia and everything from full-bodied reds to crisp whites in the Okanagan Valley. Although the wine is often super affordable (think $15-$20 CAD a bottle with little to no tasting fees – that’s about $11.50 to $15 USD!) it still tends to be exclusive, since many wineries only sell their wine from the tasting room. So traveling to the wine is often your best bet, and luckily, Canada has a lot to offer. These are the best Canadian wine regions worth busting out your passport for. Okanagan Valley, British Columbia The Okanagan Valley is Canada’s only desert, with dry, hot (really!) summers and cool evenings. With more than 185 wineries, the Okanagan Valley is British Columbia’s largest wine region by far, and the second most productive in Canada. Four different sub-regions exist in this stretch of land and the soil is ripe for many different wine varietals, including merlot, pinot gris, syrahs and rieslings. The area attracts a diversity of winemakers, too. The first indigenous-owned and operated winery in North America, Nk’Mip Cellars, is at the southern end of the Okanagan in the town of Osoyoos. Their chardonnay won gold at the Chardonnay du Monde in 2018. Just 20 minutes north in Oliver, two brothers who immigrated from Punjab, India, now run the small but successful Kismet Estate Winery, which won more than a dozen awards in 2018 for everything from their syrah and malbec reserve to their rosė – all while selling the majority of their grapes to other winemakers in the area. And the area’s features are strong enough that vintner Severine Pinte left France to be the winemaker and viticulturist LaStella Winery since 2010. Prince Edward County, Ontario Two hours east of Toronto, Prince Edward County is a popular escape for Canadians and New Yorkers alike thanks to their nearly 500 miles of sandy shoreline. When it comes to wine, they’re still the new kids in town, though they have 40+ wineries and have spent the last two decades building their reputation as top-notch winemakers. The region is known for their pinot noir and chardonnay, whose vines they painstakingly bury underground at the end of each harvest to keep safe from the icy winters. Both Rosehall Run’s 2017 JCR Pinot Noir Rosehall and their 2016 Cabernet Franc Single won gold at the National Wine Awards of Canada, and the area has had a string of awards against international competitors as well. Bunches of wine grapes waiting for frost for ice wine harvest in Ontario © Horst Petzold | Dreamstime.com Niagara, Ontario Niagara is one of the better-known wine regions in Canada, most famous for their ice wines – a syrupy-sweet drink made from grapes left on the vine into winter, where temperatures have to reach -8 degrees celsius before they’re harvested. The seasonally frigid temperatures around the Great Lakes are especially well-situated to make this kind of wine, which is why Niagara has grown its vintner reputation on it. If you’re hoping for more than a dessert drink when touring wine country, two of Niagara’s rieslings took home gold at 2019’s Decanter World Wine Awards, and the baco noir from Sue-Ann Staff Estate Winery won bronze at the 2019 Berlin International Wine Competition. To get around, you can drive, ride on a double-decker bus, or try one of the increasingly popular cycling tours. The Eastern Townships, Quebec The Eastern Townships, a collection of small cities and towns that sits two hours east of Montreal, is already a popular all-seasons getaway for New Englanders. Golf, water sports, skiing, cycling, four provincial parks and a high concentration of spas make it an easy choice when folks nearby need an escape. The elegant architecture and largely Francophone population make it feel much farther from the US than it actually is. The area is also responsible for the majority of Quebec’s local wine. One of the best ways to get a taste for the region is via their Wine Route, which follows more than 20 vineyards in the Brome-Missisquoi region. You won’t have to worry about finding your way around, as the entire 140 km (that’s about 87 miles) route is marked. Standout vineyards include Vignoble de l’Orpailleur, which has won numerous international awards for their ice wine, and Vignoble Domaine des Côtes d’Ardoise, Quebec’s first vineyard, which has mastered everything from reds to rosés and ciders over the years. Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia This area is perhaps better known for the Bay of Fundy, which has the highest tides on earth – sometimes as high as 56 feet – and regularly has 15 different species of whales swim by. It’s so special that it’s been named one of the seven wonders of North America, alongside other spots like the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls. But Annapolis Valley, which runs alongside the Bay of Fundy, has its own bragging rights, too. Home to the bulk of Nova Scotia’s wineries (11 of 18) you’d be remiss not to try Nova Scotia’s Tidal Bay appellation wine while visiting. This crisp white showcases the cool climate and oceanic influence, and uses a blend of white wines that must be grown in the Nova Scotia region. This year, Annapolis Valley vineyard Lightfoot and Wolfville won the award for Best Winery at the 2019 Atlantic Canadian Wine Awards as well as took home several different awards for their vintages, including a tied win for the Tidal Bay of the year.

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