ADVERTISEMENT

Take a Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Tour at These Real-Life Locales

By Tobey Grumet, Lonely Planet Writer
January 12, 2022
Midge And Rose

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the hit show from Amazon Prime Video, not only fueled nostalgia for 1950s New York City, it brought us to vintage Paris streets and summers in the Catskills. Now, with the premier of season 3, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is taking her show on the road. Want to follow along? Here are some of the key locations you can visit right now from the Maisel universe.

The Gaslight Cafe – NYC

For her first comedy set, Mrs. Maisel drunkenly stumbles into the cellar of a West Village comedy club and speakeasy she frequented with her philandering husband. And though there was a bar called The Gaslight in the Meat Packing district which recently closed after 21 years, the Gaslight Cafe at 116 MacDougal St. was shuttered in 1971. An underground home for creativity of all types, it hosted the likes of Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan, who recorded a live album there in 1962. The interior shots were filmed inside a studio in Brooklyn, but you can visit the exteriors at 97 St Mark’s Place in the East Village.

Old Town Bar – NYC

This Flatiron gem, Joel Maisel’s favorite hangout, is one of the oldest bars in the city and serves one heck of a cheeseburger to boot. If the prohibition-era marble-topped bar could talk, it might decide to take the fifth, but the vintage restrooms kind of say it all. An eclectic crowd of tried and true New Yorkers mingle with tourists and everyone enjoys watching the waiters serving food delivered on the dumbwaiter. See it at 45 E. 18th St.

The Maisel Apartment – NYC

The Upper West Side is Midge’s playground, and her parents’ opulent Manhattan apartment is filmed inside The Strathmore at 404 Riverside Drive, Apt 3N, overlooking the Hudson River. The building itself dates to 1909, is constructed of brick, limestone and terra cotta, and is located in Morningside Heights, closer to Columbia University (where Marion’s father, Abe, teaches) than the Museum of Natural History.

B. Altman – NYC

When Midge decides to make her own cash so she can spend nights killing it on the mic, she gets a job at this classic, now defunct, department store. The original, landmarked, building still stands nearly unchanged at 65 Fifth Avenue, though it’s now the Graduate Center for the City University of New York. Pop around the corner to the 34th St. entrance to witness the show’s exact shot, but sadly, you won’t be able to purchase any lipstick. The inside scenes were shot inside the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, a former bank in Brooklyn.

Chez Paul – Paris

When Mrs. Maisel and her father hoof it to Paris to convince Rose Weissman to come back to New York, they take a family meal in this sweet bistro at 13 rue de Charonne, Bastille in the eleventh arrondissement. The romantic, turn-of-the-century décor and checkered tablecloths highlight the classic French menu, like the perfectly cooked steak au poivre, gratin dauphinois, and of course the steak tartar - which sadly goes uneaten in the scene.

Madame Arthur – Paris

After wandering the City of Lights, Midge stumbles into this drag cabaret, which is exactly what it is in real life. Located at 75bis rue des Martyrs, 18th arrondissement, Madame Arthur has hosted bohemian luminaries such as Pablo Picasso and Toulouse-Lautrec and now presents upscale drag shows in two different theaters every night. After the cabarets, the space turns into a club which stays open until 6am.

Steiner Resort – the Catskills

Back from Paris and ready for some relaxation, the Weissmans and the Maisels head to the Catskills — with manager Susie not far behind. Just a few hours drive from Manhattan, this New York State mountain range was labeled the Borscht Belt and hosted a certain pair of dirty dancers back in the day. Scott’s Family Resort, on Oquaga Lake, stood in for Steiner Resort and still offers access to the same summer cottages, ballroom and even bowling alley that the gang frolicked in onscreen. Plunger and romper not included.

The Rockaways – Queens

When Susie is kidnapped for cash by two mobsters, they drag her kicking and kind of screaming to the Rockaways, a NYC beach area in Queens known for its surfing, tacos and cheap beer. Of course, everything turns out OK on the subway ride, once the goons realize Susie also grew up there. You can follow in their footsteps by catching the A, J or Z trains to Rockaway Boulevard, or hopping on a NYC Ferry to Rockaway Landing.

The Cedar Tavern – NYC

When Midge starts dating the handsome bachelor, Benjamin, she is sucked into the New York art scene when they visit this dive bar. Known for its weekly salon for artists, The Cedar Tavern moved twice since it opened in 1866 and shuttered for good in 2006. The scene was actually filmed in McSorley’s, a similarly old-timey bar at 15 E 7th St. near University Place. Here you can toss peanut shells on the floor and order sloppily poured mugs of just two types of beer, light and dark. Sadly, if this were really where the two lovebirds came to mingle, they would never have made it inside – McSorley’s didn’t allow women until 1970.

Miami Beach – Miami

We haven’t had a ton of spoilers for season 3, but we do know that Susie and Midge head to Miami and have the pleasure of staying at the horseshoe-shaped Fountainebleau. A beachfront resort built in 1954 with a massive pool, Versailles-like gardens and swinging scene, it was luxury incarnate and favored by celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball, Judy Garland and even Elvis, and still enjoys a retro, sherbet-colored vibe today. Its Mid-Beach location has become more popular with the opening of other high-end resorts like the Soho Beach House and The Confidante.

Las Vegas

Other than the occasional crumb dropped by producers on Instagram, we don’t know much about the locations in Vegas, but we do know This Is Us star Sterling K. Brown joins the crew as a straight-talking manager and we do see some marquees mocked up with Maisel. Other than that, you’re just going to have to tune in on December 6th to find out if what happens in Vegas…well, you know the rest.

Keep reading
Inspiration

8 Groundbreaking Exhibits to Catch at US Museums This Winter

Picasso, Van Gogh, Monet, and Dali will never cease to lure art-lovers to the grand exhibit halls of museums, but when it comes to special exhibits at American cultural institutions this winter, fashion, politics and activism, design, and science get top billing. Here are a few limited-run exhibits to catch that are sure to intrigue and inspire. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art - Kansas City, Missouri Alleles Design Studio, a Canadian company, makes prosthetic leg covers in a huge range of designs and styles, giving amputees a way to express his or her own personality. Their works are part of the vast array of objects, equipment, and machines in “Access and Ability.” Originally designed by the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, the exhibit spotlights forward-thinking designs from the past decade that have helped with the challenges of daily life that affect people with varying levels of disabilities. You’ll find pieces like an easy on/easy off shoe inspired by a child with cerebral palsy, hearing aids that double as blingy earrings, and a robotic therapy dog. Some items in the show are interactive, like eyeglasses that compensate for color blindness. Runs through February 9, 2020. Philadelphia Museum of Art - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The most extreme haute couture collections that dominate the runway at Fashion Week events from Paris to New York pale in comparison to the works on display at “Off the Wall: American Art to Wear.” The Philadelphia Museum of Art’s playful fashion exhibit features 130 one-of-a-kind creations by 60 mixed-media artists who masterfully demonstrate how the body can be a canvas. Created between 1967 and 1997, the pieces reflect the energy and mood of their time, from hippie-fueled activism to futuristic innovation. Patterns influenced by international cultures, weaving techniques inspired by Latin American artisans, and appropriation of medieval and Renaissance fashions all play a critical role in the audacious pieces on display. Runs through May 17, 2020. Museum of Contemporary Art - Chicago, Illinois With all the headlines about immigration over the past few years, it’s important to consider the dense history of displacement. “Routes and Territories” features the works of three Latin American artists who explore how leaving one’s homeland affected societies and communities since the start of the colonization of the Americas through to today. Vast mural-like paintings, old manuscripts, wire sculptures and video track the profound social, personal and political impact of migration. Runs through April 19, 2020. Library of Congress - Washington, DC After seven decades of picketing and organizing and rallying, women finally earned the right to vote in August 1920. This coming year marks the centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment and with a historic election coming up, the Library of Congress has organized “Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote,” a sweeping exhibit that pays tribute pioneering activists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony as well as the countless women who drove what some call the biggest reform movement in US history. The exhibit chronicles the origins of women’s suffrage in abolitionism through the fiery campaigns of the early 20th century. It features personal items like Anthony’s annotated copy of Mary Wollstonecraft’s “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” as well as items like tote bags, sheet music, and cookbooks and other totems of support as the movement gained momentum. Runs through September 2020. Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame - Cleveland, Ohio If an instrument is, as they say, merely an extension of a musician, then “Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll” will get you closer to rock legends than you ever imagined. Co-curated by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where it ran to much acclaim from April through October, and the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame, the show features over 100 instruments that belonged to icons and were used to perform some of the most familiar, game-changing songs in history like Jimi Hendrix’s guitar, The Who’s Keith Moon’s drum set, Patti Smith’s clarinet, and The Doors’ Ray Manzarek’s organ. Vintage concert posters and eccentric costumes boost the groovy mood. Runs through September 13, 2020. Museum of Fine Arts Houston - Houston, Texas Franklin Delano Roosevelt dedicated his presidency to preserving and furthering what’s become known as the Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Fear, and Freedom from Want. Norman Rockwell, one of the best-known chronicler of everyday life in postwar America, gave a human face to each one of those freedoms in the now-iconic paintings he made in 1943, emotional images of everyday people in expressive scenes of family, prayer, and civic courage. “Norman Rockwell: American Freedom” at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston is the first comprehensive exhibit dedicated to the Four Freedoms. The works are accompanied by historical documents, photos and artifacts, providing rich context Rockwell’s depictions. Runs through March 22, 2020. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art - San Francisco, California For as long as earthlings have gazed at the stars above, space travel has been a source of fascination. Created for the 50th anniversary of the first moonwalk, “Suits, Habs and Labs for Outer Space” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is a showcase of how designers envisioned life beyond this planet’s atmosphere. The engaging exhibit features paintings of a free-floating space colony imagined by scientists in the early 1970s to models of living and research spaces on the moon designed by architects in the past decade to colorful 3D-printed prototypes of sleek alternatives to the bulky space suit, this show demonstrates how visionary dreamers imagined the seeming impossible becoming possible. Runs through January 20, 2020. Baltimore, Maryland The works of iconic women artists like Georgia O’Keeffe and Elizabeth Calett sit side by side with lesser known but no less great painters like Marguerite Zorach and Maria Martinez. Baltimore Museum of Art’s landmark show, “By their Creative Force: American Women Modernists,” (a term taken from the writings of Virginia Woolf) consists of 20 carefully selected paintings, sculptures and decorative arts from the museum’s collection. Together, the assortment shows how women participated in and contributed to 20th century art movements, from Abstract Expressionism to Cubism. This exhibit is part of 2020 Vision, the museum’s year-long initiative to celebrate female-identifying artists. Runs through July 5, 2020.

Inspiration

Showstopping Theater Cities around The US

New York City is the theater capital of America, and Broadway is its shining star, but that doesn't mean the Great White Way has a monopoly over the medium. While the bright lights of the Big Apple may overshadow smaller theater scenes around the United States, the productions in these ten underrated towns are worth way more than rotten tomatoes.1. Minneapolis Fed up with the lights of Broadway, Sir Tyrone Guthrie moved to Minneapolis to begin his own repertory company in 1963. The Guthrie Theater went on to find success as a purveyor of classic and contemporary works and is arguably the most lauded theater venue in the Twin Cities. That's a mighty feat, considering Minneapolis and neighboring St. Paul are home to nearly 200 theaters and a healthy helping of successful organizations, including Brave New Workshop Theatre, Children's Theater Company, and touring venues like the Ordway and Orpheum. 2. Chicago Theater in Chicago is like deep-dish pizza: excellent and easy to find. The scene exploded in the mid 20th century when curtains went up on groups like Second City and Steppenwolf Theatre. Though these scrappy startups are now iconic institutions, the sentiments of their early days are still alive in Chicago's storefront theaters. Run by rag-tag post-grads looking to make their mark, these companies provide opportunities to see intimate productions in non-traditional settings. Check out The Loop's historic Broadway-style houses for big-budget musicals. Internationally acclaimed companies like the Goodman and Lookingglass are exemplary for their groundbreaking work. With over 200 operating theater companies, even the suburbs serve up award-winning theatrical experiences.3. Washington, DC Unlike its politicians, DC's theater companies know how to reach across the aisle and appeal to all audiences. The sprawling Kennedy Center is the best place to catch touring shows and concerts; Wooly Mammoth is the city's go-to for boundary-breaking theatrical experimentation; Signature Theater hosts ambitious productions of musicals; Shakespeare Theatre Company is one of the country's foremost interpreters of the Bard. Studio Theatre and Arena Stage are also noteworthy, as is Ford's Theatre, although President Lincoln had a famously terrible time there in 1865. 4. Philadelphia Philly is heaven for history buffs. There’s the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, and – drum roll please – the oldest continually operating playhouse in America. The Walnut Street Theatre, a National Historic Landmark, has been entertaining audiences for over 200 years. Locals love the out-of-the-box storytelling done by dozens of smaller organizations like the Arden, InterAct, and The Philadelphia Fringe Festival, which hosts 1,000 performances for three weeks every September. For blockbuster Broadway shows, head to the glass-domed Kimmel Center and Renaissance-style Academy of Music.5. San Diego If La Jolla Playhouse isn't using "San Diego tested, New York approved" as their motto, they're missing a good opportunity. Of the 101 original plays and musicals they've premiered, 32 found success on Broadway stages. They aren't the only ones, either. The Old Globe, modeled after Shakespeare's theater in London, has given birth to over 20 Broadway shows throughout its illustrious career. Between both theaters and nearly 150 other active performance spaces around town, San Diego is a veritable Broadway by the beach. 6. Louisville This Kentucky town turns into a hotbed of artistic activity when the Actors Theatre of Louisville hosts its annual six-week-long Humana Festival. It's like Sundance for theater geeks — people from around the world come to celebrate new productions written by an impressive roster of playwrights. The prestigious festival has premiered a zillion critically-acclaimed titles, including Becky Shaw, Danny and the Deep Blue Sea, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Dinner With Friends.7. Seattle It may be perennially overcast in this Pacific Northwest town, but Seattle's theater scene still manages to sparkle. Both A Contemporary Theater and Seattle Rep present homegrown greatness with their evocative works featuring the city's pool of talented professionals. The 5th Avenue Theatre focuses on developing new musicals and is a frequent incubator for Broadway shows. The Paramount, Moore, and Neptune Theaters — all part of Seattle Theater Group — collectively present around 700 live events annually. 8. Boston Boston is an educational playground for young voices in the American theater. Prominent regional houses, including Huntington Theatre Company and American Repertory Theater, are affiliated with local universities like Boston University, Harvard and Emerson College. The surrounding areas are home to prolific art scenes as well, including North Shore Music Theatre (a half-hour away) and the Williamstown Theatre Festival, which brings Broadway-caliber productions to the Berkshires.9. Denver For a city obsessed with outdoor activities, you may be surprised that any Mile High inhabitant would be willing to spend an evening inside a stuffy theater. But the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, the nation's largest non-profit theater organization, is too spectacular to resist. The network of venues in this architecturally dynamic downtown complex host national tour premiers and pre-Broadway engagements, produce their own world-class performances, and help groom the country's up-and-coming talents at the annual Colorado New Play Summit. 10. Dallas/Fort Worth Everything's bigger in Texas, including this city's prodigious theater landscape. The gleaming AT&T Performing Arts Center hosts glitzy touring productions. Smaller companies like the Uptown Players and Theater Three produce quirky, low-budget works. Fort Worth, a thirty-minute drive away, has a robust theater community of its own, including Casa Mañana and Bass Hall. The big-wig of the Big D? Dallas Theater Center. This nationally-recognized company has brought brand new productions and reimagined classics to Dallas for over 50 years.

Inspiration

5 Ways You Can Celebrate the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Berlin is a vibrant city known for its energy, art scene and historical past. This November marks the 30th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall signifying freedom and peace. With that momentous anniversary, Berliners and visitors from around the world will be celebrating throughout the month of November. Festivities will range from guided tours and memorials to art installations and festivals surrounding the division of Berlin, the Cold War and the Peaceful Revolution of 1989. Here are some must-see highlights that will be debuting in the coming weeks. Arts Festival From November 4th to the 10th, Berlin will be transformed into an incredible open-air exhibition. The city’s revolution will be commemorated at historic locations with large archive film and image projections, installations, concerts, lectures and more. The festival will conclude on the evening of November 9th at Brandenburg Gate, when the entire city will become the largest concert stage in the world. It will feature legendary musicians, bands and people that were involved in the Peaceful Revolution. Don’t miss the floating art installation made up of 30,000 handwritten messages by Patrick Shearn of Poetic Kinetics. Post-concert, the festivities will continue through the night with dance parties in 27 clubs across Berlin. Because what’s Berlin without a dance party? Guided Tours Tour operators throughout the city are prepared for the influx of tourists visiting Berlin to commemorate the end of divided Germany. Whether you prefer biking, walking or riding in a bus, local tour operators are ready to take you back in time and teach you about the country’s exquisite history. GetYourGuide provides dozens of tours throughout Berlin, including an excursion based upon the secrets of the Communist Capital. During this walking outing, you’ll learn about life behind the Iron Curtain and the secrets of the Stasi secret police. Visit the embassies of four Cold War powers and discover crossing points of the Berlin Wall. The Palace of Tears is one famous border crossing point between East and West Berlin that has since become a museum with exhibitions about Berlin during the Cold War. Hotels have also jumped on board by offering tours in Berlin. Located in the former Western part of the city right near the border, Orania.Berlin is offering a special package in honor of the anniversary. It includes a two-hour tour of the Berlin Wall (which can be done by bike) for guests to learn about the history of the city's division, the struggle for freedom and the process of reunification. Train Trip Why not book an entire trip to learn about Germany’s fascinating history? Well Inntravel has made it pretty easy to do just that with their self-guided rail train, Beyond the Iron Curtain. Journey by rail between the iconic cities of Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden to discover how they emerged from the cloak of the Iron Curtain. Stay two nights in each city using Inntravel walking notes to marvel at their enduring cultural treasures. In Berlin, follow a route that traces its history taking in the magnificently restored Reichstag, Brandenburg Gate and the Wall. Continue to Leipzig, best known for music, but where locals staged the largest protest demonstration in East German history. Last is Dresden which has risen from the ashes and been restored to its former glory. The package includes 6 nights’ accommodations, rail travel between Berlin-Leipzig-Dresden and city walking tour notes.Museums & Exhibits There are loads of museums and exhibits that are honoring the anniversary of the fall of the Wall. The Wall Museum East Side Gallery tells the full picture of the story of the Wall from the reasons for building the Wall to its dramatic fall in 1989. Their new exhibit is a multi-media experience that uses more than one hundred screens and projectors to guide viewers through the division of Germany. It chronicles the stories of how the wall changed people’s lives. And shows a unique perspective into the unknown side of the Cold War, showcasing the different perspectives from both the East and West by using newsreels from the 1960’s. If you want to be immersed in the history of Germany’s tumultuous past, this exhibit is surely where to do just that. 3D Reality Experience Augmented reality app MauAR, brings the Wall to life and allows users to visualize the division of Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Users can use the app in the camera view of their smartphone or tablet to point at spots where the wall previously stood to go back in time. Users can jump between three points in time – 1961, 1971 and 1981. The app will also debut five special episodes that will recount the story of the Berlin Wall and key moments in the history of the Peaceful Revolution. For example, users can travel back in time to the demonstration held on Alexanderplatz on November 4th, 1989.

Inspiration

The Best Glamping Getaways In North America for Under $150

You don’t have to be Prince Harry on honeymoon to afford unforgettable glamping destinations. There are tons of budget-friendly glamping options throughout North America, places where incredible outdoor experiences are right next to plush hideaways. You just need to know where to find them. To research our new book, Comfortably Wild, we spent three years, traveling 73,000 miles across 9 countries in search of the best glamping destinations in North America. Even after staying at Relais & Châteaux treehouses and Forbes Five-Star Ranches, some of our favorite outdoor getaways were those under $150 a night. Packed with character, natural beauty, and unconventional experiences, these affordable picks will make you feel like you’ve struck it rich. Cassiar Cannery, British Columbia Take the train through the Canadian Rockies and along the Skeena River to the secret stop: Cassiar, the former metropolis of the BC fishing world. Over the course of 107 years, tens of thousands of workers from around the world ran 22 different canneries along these shores. The last one standing and longest consecutively operating cannery on the West Coast was none other than Cassiar. Walking the historic grounds with Justine Crawford and Mark Bell, owners of this salmon-cannery-turned-glamping retreat, this forgotten world comes into focus. With their vivid descriptions, you can imagine the expansive dock, net loft, machine shop, and general store bustling with life. The five jewel-colored cottages with waves lapping beneath their porches, once the homes of the cannery managers, are now yours to enjoy. Take a jet boat to see the remnants of fellow canneries, or catch some salmon of your own. Want to dig deeper into the area’s history, ecology, or meditative qualities? You’ll love their multiday retreats. Luna Mystica, New Mexico What do you get when you cross Airstream trailers, a brewery, a music venue, and snowcapped mountains with an art colony? Glamping heaven. Taos Mesa Brewery was built on 24 acres to relish the stunning scenery of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and have ample space for festival camping. Seeing people enjoy themselves at multiday concerts, brewery cofounder Dan Irion and his brother Ryan (a civil engineer that designs RV parks), had the brilliant idea to create Luna Mystica. Each camper has been renovated with the stories of their original owners and travel history top of mind. You’ll meet Ralphie, the Airstream who spent 55 years cruising the valleys of New Mexico, and Rosie, who was in a traveling circus and decorated to reflect her gypsy flair. Staying next to the hottest music venue in Taos affords a rare combo of being in nature and the heart of the action. For even more culture, you’re 15 minutes from the art galleries downtown and the Unesco World Heritage site of Taos Pueblo. Honaunau Farm, Hawaii With the opportunity to watch the lava flow at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, stargaze from the tallest mountain in the Pacific, and stroll green sand beaches, anyone would want to stay on the island of Hawaiʻi – but you’re the savvy traveler that knows a big-box hotel isn’t the way to experience its natural beauty. Stay at Honaunau Farm and you’ll have pristine forest all the way from your ocean-view cottage to Mauna Loa volcano. From this organic farm, you can easily access the tourist attractions while having the local insights and hands-on access to Hawaii’s bounty. See the landscape from the eyes of a permaculturist, learn the latest in medicinal hemp, take a class on regenerative farming, and eat all the tropical fruit you can carry back to your safari tent or tea house. Honaunau brings the Big Island back to its purest form. The Cozy Peach, Arizona Planting seeds since 1941, the Schnepfs are excellent farmers, nationally renowned for their peaches, but their ambitions were always bigger than stone fruit. Looking to celebrate the farming heritage of Maricopa County, Arizona, they have restored the area’s historic farmhouse buildings, created a U-pick veggie patch, and they host nearly 100 days worth of festivals per year. To further immerse guests into their 300 acres of orchards, forest, and fields, they opened Cozy Peach glamping, with 10 vintage travel trailers. Just the right blend of nostalgic and contemporary, each camper has been polished like a gem. Take one of the complimentary John Deere bicycles for a ride among 5,000 peach trees, and join the farm happenings – including gardening, a cooking class, or one of their multiday festivals with live music, vintage amusement rides, and crafts. Dreamsea Surf Camp, Costa Rica Tamarindo, Costa Rica, is known as one of the world’s best beaches to learn surfing. Dive in with a seven-night stay at Dreamsea’s surf-camp-meets-yoga-retreat. Settle into your bell tent, complete with private deck to enjoy the jungle’s tropical birds and acrobatic howler monkeys, and meet your professional instructors and new surf buddies. Try the breaks at any of their four neighboring beaches, then stretch it out each evening with some downward dog. Promoting a healthy lifestyle, the chefs embrace Costa Rica’s tropical bounty and spice it up with global recipes. Stay for a one- or two-week session (it’s all-inclusive for less than $100 per person per day), or make it a true Endless Summer by applying to be a volunteer in exchange for free room & board (yeah, both kinds). Mendocino Grove, California Many city folk like the idea of a nature getaway, but may feel a little better knowing that top-notch restaurants, art galleries, and Pilates studios are nearby (you know, in case of emergency). When the founders of Mendocino Grove spotted a property on the wooded bluffs of the Pacific, just a quarter-mile from downtown, they thought, “This is the yin and yang we all need.” Mendocino was once a prosperous logging town with Victorian mansions but today the 19th-century buildings are now home to bookstores, coffee shops, organic markets, and fantastic restaurants. Trees once cut at the mills are now protected by seven state parks within a 10-mile radius. From Mendocino Grove, you can access hikes into the grand fir forest, vegan white-tablecloth meals, and award-winning theater…without even getting into a car. Though with a camp this seductive, you might never make it to town. Breakfast is served in the meadow followed by weekend yoga, your tent has ocean views, and a s’mores kit can be delivered right to your fire ring. Good Knights, Alberta Inspired by the fanciful architecture, decor, and pursuits of medieval European nobility, Good Knights is where you can play princess and feel like a king. After a decade of hosting a Renaissance fair–style festival on their property in the Alberta countryside, they decided to keep the fantasy going for guests all summer long. They built a feast hall, longbow archery range, tournament field, classical arts studio, and lavish tents, all in 14th-century fashion. In 2017 they opened their wooden gates and were an instant hit with the fantasy crowd. But the real test of their success? Skeptics like us. We initially came for the novelty of Good Knights, but after seeing everyone dressed up, learning new skills, and frolicking in merriment, we couldn’t resist the magic of this place. Great Huts, Jamaica After working as a physician around Jamaica for decades, Dr. Paul Rhodes had a vision for a resort that would celebrate the country’s West African roots and aid his humanitarian work. Collaborating with local architects and artists, Great Huts has built African-inspired structures with motifs from the Akan, Igbo, Ibibio, Mandingo, and Yoruba tribes (from which most Jamaicans descend). Bamboo huts, almond treehouses, stone towers, millet silos, and royal-themed rooms showcase African art and antiques alongside local works. More than 250 pieces of art adorn the seaside property, and various cultural events, including four-day art and film festivals, happen throughout the year. A portion of each guest’s stay and all proceeds from the festivals support eastern Jamaica’s only homeless rehabilitation center, cofounded by Dr. Paul (as he’s fondly called around the island). If you’re looking for even more good vibes at Great Huts, just practice yoga overlooking the Caribbean Sea, soak in the cliffside pool, or dance the night away to live reggae. Campera Hotel Burbuja, Mexico One of the only bubble hotels in North America, Campera Hotel Burbuja’s spherical tents line up like a string of pearls against the Docepiedras vineyard of Baja California. A well-crafted French design pressurizes the bubble so that only a thin clear wall separates you from the vines and the Milky Way. Draw back the privacy curtains on your canopy bed and catch a shooting star without leaving your silky sheets. Wake up to a sea of vines and a day of vineyard hopping at Valle de Guadalupe’s 80 wineries, or just open your minibar to sample the wines grown from grapes outside your see-through door. Asheville Glamping, North Carolina Joanna Cahill doesn’t just own Asheville Glamping; she lives it. While dreaming up the concept for this ultra-hip glamp camp, Joanna lived in a yurt she built herself. When she was able to buy the rolling hills just 10 miles north of downtown, she moved into a vintage trailer to save up for geodesic domes. Today the 18-acre property is a glamper’s candy shop, with 5 completely different structures – from bell tents to treehouses. Having started this glamping business in her 20s, she knows what millennials want—a two-story dome with a corkscrew slide to get down to the living room. They want the opportunity to chill around a firepit with views to the Blue Ridge Mountains and hop an Uber when there’s a good indie band in “Beer City,” USA. So whether you’re a hipster or a hiker rolling through North Carolina, you know where to stay. This article is adapted from Comfortably Wild: The Best Glamping Destinations in North America, published by Falcon Guides and written by Mike & Anne Howard of HoneyTrek.com.