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Canada's Natural Wonders Are Free in 2017

By Liza Weisstuch
January 12, 2022
Gulf Islands National Park Reserve
Fritz Mueller/Courtesy Parks Canada
Canada turns 150 on July 1 and it's giving a birthday gift to the world all year long: See its countless national parks and historic sites without charge with the free Discovery Pass

Nature is a little bit like love: Poets and philosophers and songwriters have struggled to describe it since, it seems, the beginning of time. Its majesty, simply put, cannot be simply put. Perhaps one of the best portrayal came from the celebrated naturalist, John Muir when he wrote “This grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor is ever rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on sea and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.”

But enough of the sentimentality. The only real way to understand nature is to experience it for yourself. You’ve likely entertained the notion of visiting Yellowstone, Yosemite or the Grand Canyon. Maybe you’ve already been. But on the occasion of Canada’s 150th birthday celebration, we’ve been spending a lot of time lately learning about our mighty northern neighbor. When it comes to breathtaking nature, Canada’s got serious game. (No, really—those geese!). But all groaners aside, there are 46 national parks in the country and 171 national historic sites. Parks Canada, which was registered as a government agency under the National Parks Act of 1911, oversees all those national parks, the one urban national in Ottowa, and 125 national historic sites, the first of which, Fort Ann National Historic Site in Nova Scotia, was designated 100 years ago in 1917.

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We recently told you that 2017 marks the 150th anniversary of Canada and offered a rundown of its diverse offerings, from natural wonders to sports to cultural destinations. But here's the biggest news yet: on the occasion of the nation's birthday, Parks Canada is giving the world a gift. All year they’re giving out the Discovery Pass, which affords free entry to any park and historic site—148 in all—for a carload of up to seven people. The pass typically goes for $136 Canadian dollars. Little wonder, then, that as of early April, they’ve received 5.9 million orders for the pass, says Eric Magnan, media relations officer at Parks Canada. Additionally, boats get free lockage to the seven national sites, a fee that typically runs $8.80 per foot. (And take note: a small boat is 25 feet.)

“It’s a great opportunity to visit hidden gems,” Magnan says. Among the many suggestions he gave us is Rocky Mountain Historic Site, which is situated close to Banff National Park, offers a heritage camping experience of sleeping in teepees. Also, the Grasslands is still considered a somewhat undiscovered destination, especially for horse riders, he notes.  

“The diversity of activities and landscapes makes our national parks different and unique. In a few hours’ drive you can totally disconnect from urban life,” says Magnan. “For me, that feeling of being free in a national park, that’s really what thrills me.” 

So about those sites, Canada is home to some of the most superlative sites the planet has to offer—the biggest, highest, darkest of their class. Take, for instance, Kluane National Park and Reserve in the southwest Yukon. It’s where Mount Logan juts 5,959 meters into the sky, higher than any other peak in the nation. It’s also where you’ll find the country’s largest ice field, so it’s no surprise that it’s a destination for rafting-loving adventurers. The calving glaciers make for spectacular scenery on the water. 

Speaking of scenery on the water, the Bay of Fundy, part of Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, offers quite a spectacle: the world’s highest tides. At the head of the bay, waves can rise as high as 16 meters, which translates to about the height of a four-story building. Inland there's plenty of camping options, including yurts. For a different kind of extreme excursion to water, check out Lake Superior, the world’s largest freshwater lake. This Ontario destination, often referred to an inland ocean, has long stunned people with its intense storms. It’s part of a National Marine Conservation area, soon to be recognized as one of the largest protected areas of fresh water in the world. And while we’re on the topic of fresh water, the world’s largest freshwater archipelago, Georgian Bay Islands National Park, features woodlands that offer bike trails, secluded campsites, waterfront cabins and hiking trails with unbeatable shoreline views.

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The Discover Pass also offers access to a huge range of awe-inspiring historical sites, including feats of industrial and manufacturing progress that man has been able to achieve over the years, each quite consummate in its own right and, of course, a wondrous sight to behold. What’s more, each embodies a moment of history, a turning point in the nation. Take, for instance, Red Bay National Historic Site in Newfoundland and Labrador, the world’s largest and most complete industrial-scale whaling station. With its large population of right and bowhead wales, the area drew multitudes of whalers from Spain’s Basque during the mid-16th century. They established a major whaling port that stands mightily today. Over in Ontario you’ll find the Peterborough Lift Lock at the Trent-Severn Waterway, the world’s highest hydraulic lift, which opened in 1904.

Elsewhere in Ontario, an industrial feat from later in the 20th century is on display at the HMCS Haida, the world’s only surviving tribal class destroyer. Known as "Canada's most fightingest ship," it tread waters during WWII, the Korean War and the Cold War and today it sits majestically in Hamilton’s gorgeously revived Bayfront Park.

This is merely a tiny sampling of Canada’s rich offerings. We’ll leave it up to you to head north and discover the rest. 

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Adventure

3 Gorgeous Places to See Spring Flowers

Spring is on the way, we promise! And we don’t just love the longer days and the warm sun. Some of the world's best travel destinations are hotspots for beautiful spring flowers. We're here to show you some of the most beautiful places to see the most colorful blooms. 1. AMSTERDAM Step into a Technicolor wonderland! Keukenhof Gardens, outside Amsterdam, is one of the world’s most spectacular flower gardens in April when the tulips are in bloom. Take a guided tour, or rent a bike to go exploring. Or if you really want to indulge, book one of Avalon Waterway’s Tulip Time river cruises. The Netherlands is tulip-crazy all spring long, and Budget Travel loves Amsterdam for museums filled with Van Goghs and Vermeers, its charming canals, and affordable lodging. 2. DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA Sure, the name sounds bleak, but when winter rains water the California desert and the sun warms the land, wildflowers bloom in the spring. While not every year is categorized a “super-bloom” (a perfect storm of gentle rain, sun, and warm winds), it’s always a knockout, with Desert Gold, Evening Primrose, and Desert Dandelion putting on quite a show. 3. KAUAI, HAWAII It’s always prime time for flowers in Hawaii, but spring is affordable “shoulder season” here and the Hawaiian island of Kauai has a special treat: The new McBryde Gardens, part of the National Tropical Botanical Garden network, which premiered in 2017. You’ll see Bird of Paradise, Hibiscus, and the Banana Shrub, which actually smells like a banana daiquiri!

Adventure

Confessions of a National Park Ranger

ALL THAT FRESH AIR COMES AT A PRICE There's a saying about park rangers: "You get paid in sunrises and sunsets." That's really true. You don't do this job for the pay. Sometimes you have to wonder why we work so hard to get these federal positions. The people who are attracted to the job are outsiders—they enjoy solitude, they enjoy nature. It's the most unlikely group of people you'd expect to want to work with the federal government. And you have to give up a lot. It's extremely difficult to have a family or meet someone. You work seasonal positions for years until you finally get a permanent spot, only to realize you like a seasonal girl who's not going to be around in six months. TWO PARTS ACTION-ADVENTURE FLICK, ONE PART OFFICE SPACE I've had moments where the job is as exciting as anything you can imagine. You're fighting wildfires, getting lowered from helicopters on a rescue, chasing someone down with a gun on your side, going out on a manhunt. Then sometimes you're directing traffic or dealing with the bureaucracy of the federal government.  LOST FROM THE GET-GO It doesn't matter which park you're working, people are like deer in the headlights. They're totally out of their element, they don't know where anything is, and half the time they haven't done any research before their trip. At the Grand Canyon, people will show up on the North Rim only to find out they're on the wrong side—and then they're shocked that they have to drive all the way around the canyon to get to the South Rim. I had one lady bawling when I told her it was a five-and-a-half-hour drive to the other side. She was like, "There's no bridge?!" NO COMMON SENSE There's no shortage of stupidity when it comes to what people will do. They'll sit right at the edge of the canyon, where there are no guardrails and it's a 1,000-foot drop. And people forget that they're at 8,500 feet. They wonder why they're having chest pains. They think they're having a heart attack, and we have to remind them it's the altitude. Then there are always people who hike down into the canyon and are totally unprepared—no water, no idea how long it will take. They don't realize there's a big change in temperature and conditions when you drop from 8,500 feet to 2,200 feet. That's one of our most common rescues. They always say they were so in awe of the beauty that they didn't realize how far they'd gone. PEOPLE WILL DO ANYTHING FOR A PICTURE It's absolutely astounding what people will do just to prove they saw something. They'll jump from rock pillar to rock pillar—nothing below—just to get the right angle for a shot of the canyon. Sometimes someone's camera falls over the edge and they're crawling over to try to get it. Or they'll stop in the middle of the road, with cars behind them, just to get a picture of a deer (you know, we've all seen deer, but these are deer with the Grand Canyon in the background). AMERICANS ARE THE WORST I've seen far more interest from foreigners in our national parks than by Americans. You'll be talking to someone from New Zealand and they're asking you about the geography, the culture, the history. And then an American asks you where the burger stand is. I'll LET YOU IN ON A SECRET—MAYBE People are always asking where the best place in the park is, or where they should go to watch the sunset. If I can tell someone is really interested, I'll probably tell him. But if it's some entitled jackass who rushes up to me like, "Hey, man, I got 20 minutes in the park. What's the absolutebestspot?"—no way. And then sometimes you do share, and it backfires. Someone once told me I ruined his vacation because I gave him the wrong place to watch the sunset. BEING A MEMBER HAS ITS PRIVILEGES In any profession, you're going to get certain privileges, but I try not to take advantage of my position. But yeah, there have been times when I've gotten pulled over, and I made sure my badge was right next to my driver's license so the cop sees it. There's kind of an understanding. WHEN THE MOMENT IS RIGHT... There's something about national parks. You're in an unbelievably romantic place. It gets your juices flowing, creates a spark. Things happen. There are definitely times when a ranger has to approach a car because the windows are a bit steamy. But sometimes we turn a blind eye to it. We're all human. SEE MORE FROM BUDGET TRAVEL: 15 More Places Every Kid Should See Before 15 10 Most Sacred Spots on Earth Secret Hotels of Florida's Gulf Coast 12 Elevators You Have to See to Believe Tax Refund = Vacation! 7 Amazing Trips That You Can Afford Right Now

Adventure

10 Most Beautiful Waterfalls

Few things in nature are as mesmerizing as a waterfall—the thunderous roar as water spills over cliffs, the light glistening off the spray, the sheer force of it all. We found the 10 most enticing cascades on the planet. Some are obvious choices (who could resist the honeymooners' classic Niagara?), others are more obscure (ever heard of Langfoss?), but they all share an important quality: One look, and you're bound to be transfixed for hours.   1. NIAGARA FALLS New York and Canada The most powerful waterfall in North America, Niagara straddles the international border between Canada and the U.S., near Buffalo, New York. It is divided into three distinct cascades: The 167-foot-high American Falls and the 181-foot-high Bridal Veil Falls sit on the U.S. side; the 158-foot-high Horseshoe Falls drops on the Canadian. People debate which country holds the better view, but the truth of it is, the best vantage point isn't from either shoreline. It's from the water. The Maid of the Mist ventures to both sides along the Niagara River. The 600-passenger vessel gets so close to the action, in fact, that guests are outfitted with rain ponchos to keep them dry from the torrential spray. If you do take the half-hour ride, you'll join the company of former passengers Theodore Roosevelt and Marilyn Monroe (open April through late October, $13.50 per person). Closest major city: Niagara sits 17 miles north of Buffalo; from there, the falls are an easy 25-minute drive along I-190. Best time to go: Summer crowds can overwhelm, so visit during the shoulder seasons instead. You can't go wrong in May, June, and September.   2. HANAKAPI'AI FALLS Kauai, Hawaii Hanakapi'ai calls to mind the prehistoric, untouched beauty of the landscapes in the Jurassic Park films (minus the dinosaurs, of course). The thin veil of water plunges 300 feet from volcanic-rock cliffs cloaked in tropical rain forest. Better still, to get there, you follow the famously scenic  Kalalau Trail, which traces the lush, green Na Pali Coast for 11 miles along the northern coast of the island. You can access the trail from Ke'e Beach. You don't need a guide for the hike—the trail is clearly marked and well trod—but remember to pack water because the sun can get pretty hot here and the hike is strenuous in a few sections. En route, you'll pass through bamboo forests and cross a freshwater stream; two miles in, you'll reach a quiet inlet of Ke'e Beach, where it's not unusual to spot pods of dolphins playing in the surf. Closest major city: The trailhead at Ke'e Beach is a quick 15-minute drive north from the town of Hanalei, Kauai. From there, the hike takes two to four hours round-trip, depending on your fitness level and how long you linger at the beach and the waterfall. Best time to go: You'll find the best deals on flights and hotels from mid-September through December, and from January through May. Avoid hiking the trail in August, when temperatures can climb into the 90s. Be sure to get an early start; the parking lot at Ke'e Beach fills up by mid-morning.   Related: World's Most Beautiful Lakes   3. PLITVICE LAKES  Croatia If the Grand Canyon were covered in Technicolor green moss, spotted with 16 lakes across its base, and laced with thousands of falls along its walls, it would look a little something like Plitvice Lakes National Park in southwestern Croatia ($15 entrance fee, per person). The color of the water is intensely turquoise, thanks to the unique mix of minerals and organisms in runoff from the Dinaric Alps. The Plitvice National Park Service offers three-hour tours, starting at $130 for groups, but it's more fun to explore at your own pace, stopping to duck under waterfalls when you need to cool off. Allow a solid two to three hours to poke around, and be sure to take in the view from the first entrance to the park. The perch, high above a series of caves, overlooks all the lakes. Maps for sale ($4 each) at the tourist information booths, located at each of the park's two entrances, will help you navigate the park's labyrinth of trails and boardwalks. Closest major city: The park is 80 miles south of Zagreb and an easy two-hour drive by car. Best time to go: The weather is reliably warm and sunny from May through September.   4. IGUAZÚ FALLS  Argentina A network of 275 falls that spans nearly two miles across, Iguazú is so striking in its immensity that when Eleanor Roosevelt first saw the falls, she remarked, "poor Niagara." The water plummets with such intense force that the spray almost looks as if it's shooting up from the pools below. One of the most popular sections is Devil's Throat, a horseshoe-shaped waterfall that's 269 feet wide and 2,300 feet long. You could visit Iguazú on your own, but you'll see more with an experienced guide. The full-day excursion with Viator takes you by bus to Devil's Throat and the falls' Upper and Lower Circuits and also grants you access to the Train of the Forest, a railway system that travels through the park and to the footbridges overlooking the falls ($35 per person). Closest major city: Iguazú is 670 miles (and a 90-minute flight) north of Buenos Aires. Best time to go: For the best prices and warm temperatures (75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit), go in October. Avoid January, February, and Easter vacation, when Argentines and Brazilians flock to the falls. And stay away during May and July, the two rainiest months.   Related: World's Most Beautiful Castles   5. YOSEMITE FALLS  California A poster child for the American West, this three-tiered fall stretches 2,425 feet from top to bottom. The waterfall itself is gorgeous, but it is the surroundings-granite cliffs and Giant Sequoia trees-that make it one of the most striking sights in the country. The falls are visible from many places around Yosemite Valley, particularly near Yosemite Lodge. From the lodge's parking lot, you can get even closer by taking one of the  National Park Service's free, 20-minute shuttle bus rides to stop no. 6, where a one-mile loop trail leads to the base of Lower Yosemite Fall. Closest major city: Yosemite National Park is 195 miles (and a four-hour drive) east of San Francisco. Best time to go: The falls are at their most spectacular when the winter ice and snow are melting, from March to June. Peak flow is in May.   6. VICTORIA FALLS  Zimbabwe and Zambia More than twice as high as Niagara Falls and about a mile across, the absolute mass of this gusher is mind-boggling. The force of the water falling into the pool below is so great, in fact, that on clear days you can see the spray from as far as 30 miles away. The local populace is equally impressive: Baboons, elephants, and hippos are often spotted along the shores of Victoria. Safari Par Excellence can set you up with everything, whether you're looking for a simple rafting trip on the Zambezi River leading up to Victoria (from $135 per person for a half-day) or a helicopter ride to view the white rhinos in nearby Mosi-oa Tunya National Park (from $120 per person). Closest major city: Livingstone, Zambia, is about eight miles from Victoria Falls. Most visitors fly into Livingstone International Airport and then take a shuttle to their hotel, where tour operators pick up guests and transport them to the falls. Best time to go: The perfect window is from February to May, when the rainy season has just ended but the falls are still gushing.   Related: World's Newest Natural Wonders   7. SUTHERLAND FALLS  New Zealand Set on the southwestern tip of the South Island, Fiordland National Park is perfectly calibrated to create cascades: The rugged landscape gets a steady supply of rain 300 days a year and has hundreds of falls to show for it. The true masterpiece of hte bunch is Sutherland. Its water drops 1,904 feet and shifts to the right at one point and then back to the left at another, forming three distinct sections. The best way to see the trio is by hiking a three-mile portion of the Milford Track, one of New Zealand's most popular trails. You can access the Milford near the town of Quintin, at the Quintin Hut, then follow the trail south for approximately 45 minutes to the base of the falls. Closest major city: Fiordland National Park is about 280 miles southwest of Queenstown. Most visitors rent a car to make the drive, which takes about five hours from Queenstown. Best time to go: Go during New Zealand's summer, December to February, when the days are long and the temperatures hover around a comfortable 70 degrees Fahrenheit.   8. GULLFOSS FALLS  Iceland Located on the southwest coast of Iceland, this is one of the most unconventional-looking waterfalls around. It's two-tiered, and even though neither drop is particularly high, together they make for an incredible sight. The first fall cascades to the right, the water churning around before hitting a sheer cliff, where it turns to the left and drops again. Viator Tours operates a half-day trip that stops at Gullfoss and two more of Iceland's biggest attractions: Geysir, which can spout water up to 230 feet high, and the Kerid volcanic crater ($88 per person). Closest major city: Viator Tours provides transportation to and from Reykjavik. The bus ride is 75 miles and takes about an hour and a half. Best time to go: Go during June, July, and August, when the ice has melted and temperatures are at their warmest (ranging from 55 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit).   Related: Top U.S. Water Parks   9. ANGEL FALLS  Venezuela The tallest waterfall in the world at 3,211 feet, Angel Falls is so high that some of the water evaporates before it even reaches the pool below. When you look up from the base, the waterfall seems to come from nowhere. Unlike most falls, this one isn't fed by snowmelt, a lake, or a river, but by rainfall from the tropical clouds. Getting to and from Angel Falls on your own is logistically tricky, so it's necessary to see this cascade with a guide. The three-day tour from Akanan Travel & Adventure includes airfare from Caracas, Venezuela's capitol, to Angel Falls; hammocks to sleep on; all meals; and insider access to the falls, including hikes, canoe rides, and a dip in a hidden pool at the base of the waterfall ( $450 per person). Closest major city: Angel Falls is located in  Canaima National Park, which has an on-site airport that connects visitors to and from Caracas. Best time to go: Akanan's tours run from July through November, when the waterfalls flow is at its heaviest.   10. LANGFOSS WATERFALL  Norway Instead of falling in a straight drop like most waterfalls, Langfoss slips down a cliff, maintaining contact with the rocks the entire way down, before spilling into Akra Fjord. Langfoss isn't the biggest waterfall in Norway, but its combined height (2,008 feet) and width (205 feet) are an impressive combination. The mountainside in the background turns bright green with new vegetation in the summer, providing a striking contrast to the whitewater of the falls and the charcoal-gray rocky outcroppings. It's one of the few waterfalls in Norway that hasn't been tapped for hydroelectric power and is still in its natural state. The  Langfoss Waterfall Fjord Cruise travels past tiny farms and rugged mountains on its way to the gusher ($45). Closest major city: From Oslo, you can drive the 246 miles (about five hours) to the small town of Etne, where Langfoss falls; you can also fly from Oslo directly into Haugesund airport and then drive 43 miles to Etne. Best time to go: The weather around Langfoss is at its best from June through September.   See more popular content: 10 Islands to See Before You Die Top Budget Destinations for 2011 9 Must-Visit Caribbean Islands Top 10 Most Travel-Inspiring Films of the Year

Adventure

10 Natural Phenomena You Need to See to Believe

From the spectacle of thousands of fireflies flashing in unison in a forest in Papua New Guinea to the wonder of a night sky painted blue, green and purple over a lonely fjord in northern Norway, the planet brims with natural-made miracles.  Pack your sense of adventure, an appreciation for the unpredictable, and follow our lead around the world to spots where light, coral, ice, butterflies—even worms—create some of the world's prettiest drama.  SEE THE PHENOMENA 1. AURORA BOREALIS, NORWAY  When energetic particles from the magnetosphere hit the earth's atmosphere, the skies in the planet's northernmost regions turn into an artist's palette of green and blue swathes and swirls—and, more rarely, red and purple—in the spectacle known as the Northern Lights. The winter of 2012 brought the most intense illuminations in the past 50 years thanks to the Solar Maximum. But the lights make predictable appearances every winter in places like the Lofoten Islands and Tromso, where you can maximize your chances of seeing them during a six-day cruise with Hurtigruten through Norway's northernmost locales. A delivery ship transporting goods and passengers along the coast, the cruise line offers well-priced packages in a notoriously expensive destination (hurtigruten.us, from $1,203 per person for a five-night "Classic Voyage South" cruise from Kirkenes to Bergen, includes full board).   2. MONARCH MIGRATION, VALLE DE BRAVO, MEXICO  The butterfly effect is in full effect every autumn when monarchs from the Rocky Mountains make like snowbirds, flying between 1,200 and 2,800 miles south for the more moderate climes of forested regions high in Mexico's mountains. Guided by the sun's orbit, the butterflies reach Mexico by late October and early November, where they spend the winter hibernating. The trees they converge upon pulse with the movement of their delicate wings. Angangueo in Michoacán is the most popular place to see them. But for less of a tourist crush, head to the high forests two hours outside of Mexico City near the town of Valle de Bravo. See them on your own or book a tour through Tours by Locals (toursbylocals.com, $180 for two people for a tour from Mexico City). 3. CORAL SPAWNING, BONAIRE  Who knew coral had such flamboyant sex lives? Every year—most often in the months of September and October, in the days following the full moon—the coral-clad walls fringing the scuba diving-crazed island of Bonaire become awash with tiny white, orange, and pink spheres (yep, eggs and sperm) that erupt, volcano-like, from the corals and float on the currents to continue the cycle life. In addition to the divers there to ogle the nighttime scene, the reef comes alive with thousands of fishy mouths anticipating an annual feast like no other. Captain Don's Habitat gives you the option to pay one price for accommodations, diving equipment, and guided diving excursions (habitatbonaire.com, $666 per person for 7 nights in an ocean view room; includes 6 single-tank boat dives and unlimited shore diving).  4. FIREFLY TREES, PAPUA NEW GUINEA  Nothing makes you feel like a kid again like chasing fireflies. But it's one thing to see a few flitting in your suburban backyard and quite another entirely to witness several massive trees illuminated with fireflies, like so many strands of Christmas lights strung through their branches. At locations across Southeast Asia—from India and Malaysia to Papua New Guinea—fireflies congregate in trees and bushes along mangrove-lined rivers where they breed, synchronizing their flashes for all to see.  Walindi Resortin Papua New Guinea offers nightly tours to take in the spectacle in the surrounding forest (walindi.com, tours from $8 per person). 5. GEOTHERMAL POOLS, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, USA That the planet is broiling with molten rock and unfathomable heat beneath our feet is no secret. Nowhere on earth is that more obvious than in Yellowstone National Park, which contains the world's most diverse display of heat-inspired drama. Old Faithful draws the masses, but a more interesting and varied foray into the geothermal wonders awaits along the boardwalk trail of West Thumb Geyser Basin. The landscape is always in flux, but you can see more than 15 geysers, boiling springs, cones, and deep, scalding pools colored emerald, sapphire, and black pocketing the earth's crust (nps.gov, $25 per vehicle or $12 per person on foot, kids under 16 enter free). 6. JELLYFISH LAKE, PALAU  Swimming in a lake full of jellyfish might sound like a form of medieval torture. But in a freshwater lake of Palau's Rock Islands, the predator-less jellyfish have lost their ability to sting. Sam's Tours runs daily snorkel trips to Jellyfish Lake, reached by a short but steep hike over the limestone island's crest and a quick swim to the other side of the lake. Come sunscreen- and lotion-free so you won't pollute the lake, then gently stroke your way to where the jellyfish are clustering (they follow the sun around the lake throughout the day, soaking up energy). Through your mask or goggles (fins are not allowed), you'll see thousands of the orange-colored polyps pulsing through the green water. Moving amongst them and diving down to feel their soft bodies brush against your own is like something from a dream (Samstours.com, $115 per person for a day tour; park permit is an additional $35 per person). 7. GLOWWORM CABES, WAITOMO, NEW ZEALAND  The limestone caves in the Waitomo region of New Zealand's North Island are home to a fascinating phenomenon—the presence of Arachnocampa luminosa, a unique-to-New Zealand glow worm that manifests itself like an entire galaxy of light on the ceilings and walls of the dark caves here. Boats bring visitors into the dark netherworld of Waitomo Glowworm Cave to see the worms emit light. For more adrenaline, sign up for a blackwater rafting trip to travel deeper into the grottoes via ziplines and tubes (Waitomo.com, from $39 per person to visit the caves, $181 ($163 if you book online) per person for a 5-hour "Black Abyss" blackwater rafting trip).  8. BIOLUMINESCENT BAY, VIEQUES, PUETRO RICO  Imagine the Northern Lights underwater—that's what a boat tour through a bioluminescent bay is like. The brightest such body of water in the world can be found in Mosquito Bay off the coast of Vieques, Puerto Rico. The billions of dinoflagellates (microscopic plankton) that live here give off a blue and green glow when anything agitates the water around them—creating the appearance of swirls of fairy dust as boat engines ply the lake (and swimmers glide across the water). Island Adventures Biobay Tours offers year round trips to Mosquito Bay where you can see the phenomenon for yourself. Set your camera to an ISO of 1200 for the best shot at capturing the scene (Biobay.com, $40 per person). 9. CALVING GLACIER (SERMEQ KUJALLEQ), ILULISSAT ICEFJORD, GREENLAND  The thunder of an iceberg being born is like no sound on earth. Want to see the most active calving glacier in the Northern Hemisphere? Make the trek 155 miles north of the Arctic Circle to Ilulissat, Greenland (you can get there by flying from Copenhagen). Some 20 million tons of ice break away from the Sermeq Kujalleq glacier on a daily basis, bombing into the sea and beginning new lives as drifting icebergs. Ask for a room on the top floor of the Hotel Hvide Falkand you'll be able to watch (and hear!) the groaning ice cap from your balcony (Hotelhvidefalk.gl, doubles from $250). 10. VOLCAN PACAYA, GUATEMALA  You'll likely melt the rubber on your sneakers' soles at some point during the 1.5 hour hike to this active, lava-producing volcano about 15 miles outside of Guatemala City. Consistently active since 1965, Pacaya has erupted more than 20 times in the last 500 years. Be sure to heed local advice on the current safety of hiking Pacaya during your visit. If the volcano is deemed safe for a tour on the day of your visit, enjoy an experience like no other—toasting a marshmallow on a stick over a simmering, bright orange lava flow. Tours can be arranged in the popular tourist town of Antigua, about 90 minutes by shuttle bus from Pacaya (Turansa.com, $15 per person from Antigua).