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Taco Bell Is Opening Its Own Hotel and Holy Crap How Soon Can We Check In?

By Sasha Brady, Lonely Planet Writer
May 21, 2019
A street view of a Taco Bell restaurant logo in California.
Ken Wolter/Dreamstime
For extra immersion into the world of soft tacos, fire sauce, and cinnamon twists, Taco Bell is launching its very own hotel in Palm Springs this summer.

Tacos for breakfast, tacos for lunch, tacos for dinner, and especially tacos for late-night snacks. There’s no bad time to eat tacos and no bad place either. A versatile crowd-pleaser, it can be celebrated anywhere – even at its own hotel. Yes, you can soon live out your delicious little fast food fantasies 24/7 when The Bell: A Taco Bell Hotel and Resort launches in Palm Springs, CA, on August 9.

What to Expect From The Bell: A Taco Bell Hotel and Resort

“Get ready for ‘Bell’ hops and Baja Blasts, fire sauce and sauce packet floaties, because the Taco Bell Hotel is coming and will give fans an unexpected and unforgettable trip of a lifetime,” a Taco Bell spokesperson said. “From check-in to check-out, The Bell: A Taco Bell Hotel and Resort reimagines what a hotel stay can be, unveiling a destination inspired by tacos and fueled by fans.”

Taco-Themed Rooms and Menu Surprises

The Bell will open for a limited time of three nights and is an adults-only resort with a minimum age limit of 18. It will feature taco-themed rooms, a poolside cocktail bar and an on-site salon for Taco Bell-inspired nail art and unisex beauty treatments. Naturally, it will feature a Taco Bell restaurant but with some new menu surprises that the restaurant promises you won’t find anywhere else.

“It will be fun, colourful, flavorful and filled with more than what our fans might expect,” said Taco Bell’s chief global brand officer Marisa Thalberg. “Also, just like some of our most sought-after food innovation, this hotel brings something entirely new for lucky fans to experience and enjoy.”

The exact location is still under wraps but reservations will open in June and you can stay up-to-date with announcements here.

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