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Destination Relaxation: 6 Luxe and Affordable Spas for Summer

By Ashley M. Biggers
January 12, 2022
A woman's getting a massage with candles in the foreground
Milkos/Dreamstime
As the temperature rises, prices at these Southwest spas and resorts drop. Here are a few where you can relax big-time on a budget.

Across the desert Southwest, spa resorts soothe sore muscles and relieve stress — likely with a cocktail or cucumber water on the side. But these big-time amenities come with hefty price tags. The exception is the summer season, when sizzling temperatures outside can mean hot deals on room rates and spa services. Here are bargain spa resorts to book this and every summer—too hot to turn down.

1. Hacienda del Sol: Tucson, AZ

Who’s up for a weekend in Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn’s romantic hideaway? This storied resort in the Santa Catalina Mountain foothills has all the timeless charm you’d expect of a 90-year-old resort frequented by stars of the Silver Screen, with all the top amenities of today. Its $90 room rates this summer nod to its emerald anniversary celebrations. Historic rooms outfitted with hand-crafted furniture and hardwood floors overlook a courtyard brimming with desert fauna. No trip to the guest ranch is complete without a horseback ride, and an infinity-edge pool and well-appointed spa await after a day on the trail. The resort designed its spa treatments for guests to enjoy in the privacy of their rooms or in the open-air of their rooms’ private patios, some with mountain views. The resort often offers deals for travelers visiting on Tuesdays, so mid-week travelers stand to save. (haciendadelsol.com)

2. The Phoenician: Scottsdale, Arizona

Nestled against desert foothills and Camelback Mountain, this resort completed a massive, three-year renovation and transformation in 2019 — the first since opening its doors in 1988. Today’s guests will find sparkling modern guest rooms, public spaces, bars, and restaurants. The Phoenician Spa is now housed in three-story building topped with a rooftop pool. Peak room rates start around $649, but a summertime stay will run you about $179 per night. Spa specials up the ante. In the off-season, you can get a second treatment for 50 percent off, and special rates for popular services. For example, in 2019, guests can book a 50-minute massage, personal remedy facial, and manicure/pedicure combo for $129 from Mondays to Thursdays, and $149 Fridays to Sundays. (thephoenician.com)

3. Fairmont Scottsdale Princess: Scottsdale, Arizona

Want a white-sand beach without a trip to the coast? Fairmont Scottsdale Princess has one—along with five other pools, two rip-roaring waterslides, and activities in the Trailblazers Family Adventure Center. All that adds up to an 11 out of 10 on the family-fun scale. Parents will have even more fun with the accompanying room rates: Families get 50 percent off a second room for children under 18. (Room rates start at $159.) Parents looking for relaxation--or any adult traveler, for that matter--can book the Well & Being Spa Relaxation Package. Starting at $219, the offer includes one-night accommodation and a $200 credit per room, per night. Doing the math? Yep, that comes out to $19 for an overnight and a blissed-out spa day.

4. Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain Resort and Spa: Paradise, AZ

Mountains versus the beach. It’s a classic vacation dilemma. At this resort and spa, where you can soak up views of Camelback Mountain while you swim, you get both. Terraced on that landmark hill, the property brandishes luxurious décor of stone, wood, and refined flowing fabrics in the lobby and in the casitas, suites, and villas. Most have views of Paradise Valley. May through September is low-season, when the mercury can climb above 120 degrees but prices drop. Room rates in the off-season start at $259 and include a $50 resort credit to use on a spa treatment. Relaxation comes at a bargain too, with 60-minute custom massages offered at $50 off regular prices. (sanctuaryoncamelback.com)

5. Colony Palms Hotel: Palm Springs, CA

Party like it’s 1936! Okay, the year may not merit a saying or song, but travelers get on board quickly at Colony Palms Hotel. A summer special here reflects the hotel’s founding year: $193.60 room rates, plus a $100 spa credit (standard rates from $169, without a credit). The property is dripping with charm thanks to its Spanish-colonial-inspired architecture, from arch entryways to original ceramic floor tiles. It’s set a block from the city’s popular design district, but between the on-site restaurant, the pool, and the spa, it’s easy to fill your entire day on the property. (colonypalmshotel.com)

6. Korakia Pensione: Palm Springs, California

Morocco is closer than a continent away at Korakia Pensione. The dreamy resort has two well-appointed historic villas, one designed in Moroccan style and one with one with Mediterranean influences. A keyhole-shaped grand entrance welcomes guests to the 1.5-acre property, where lush gardens of citrus and olive trees, date palms, and bougainvillea vines surround Moroccan fountains and bungalows. With grounds like that, opt for an alfresco massage at the indoor/outdoor spa, a yoga class, and a meditation session, often offered outdoors in refreshing morning air, which stays cool until the sun starts blazing. Rates regularly begin at $239 a night, but summer prices start at $170. Seasonal savings grow when travelers book two or more nights Sunday to Friday. (korakia.com)

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Budget Travel Lists

Summer Solstice 2019: Top 8 Celebrations Around the World

For some countries, Summer Solstice means the beginning of summer. For many, the longest day (or shortest night) of the year is a time for revelry steeped in local culture and history. Take a spin around a maypole, dance in a glacier or catch a midnight baseball game, summer solstice celebrations around the world can be a truly magical experience. Here's our top eight. 1. Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England The purpose of the impressive boulder formations of Stonehenge may still be cloaked in mystery, but they serve as the perfect backdrop of a phenomenal – and arguably the most famous – solstice celebration. Believed to be the site of ancient Druid solstice celebration, visitors flock to the site where they are granted one-day access to the inner prehistoric stone circle and face what’s known as the Heel Stone, to catch the sunrise over the sculpture. Admission is free for the celebration; however, it has become so popular that thousands of people attend annually, camping out days in advance and donning traditional Celtic attire. 2. Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, USA About one-third of the state of Alaska lies north of the Arctic circle, therefore a solstice celebration can be found pretty much wherever you land. Up north, Fairbanks goes for good old Americana with the Midnight Sun Baseball Game, a tradition since the town’s beginnings. The game kicks off at 10:30pm and pauses close to midnight for the singing of the Alaska Flag Song. A little further south, Anchorage gets 22 hours of daylight and they use all of them with the Anchorage Mayor’s Marathon and the Solstice Festival & Hero Games, where first responders test their mettle in light competition and artists, musicians and more transform downtown into a party. 3. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada A diversity of cultures is represented in Ottawa’s three-day Summer Solstice Indigenous Festival, which fuses the longest day of the year with Canada’s Indigenous People’s Day. The area was the traditional territory of the Algonquin people before Queen Victoria declared Ottawa Canada’s capital. During the festival, you’ll find food by celebrated indigenous chefs, traditional costumes and cultural events. A visually captivating Pow Wow brings out the best talent in the surrounding areas, competing for $75,000 in prizes. Admission is free. 4. Reykjavik, Iceland During the solstice, the land of fire and ice turns into the land of rock and roll, taking advantage of the midnight sun with a blowout Secret Solstice Festival: three days of eclectic music acts which this year include local favorites along with Patti Smith, Morcheeba and the Black Eyed Peas. Iceland’s solstice revelry reaches back to the Norse nations, who believed in natural symbolism and saw the solstice as a time of celebration. The Secret Solstice festival also features side events utilizing Iceland’s bounty, like an intimate music lineup in a lava cave and a party in Langjökull, Europe’s second-largest glacier, where the sounds bounce off the crystals and where, of course, you’ll want to dress warmly. 5. Stockholm, Sweden Midsummer in Sweden is sweet with romance, with traditional maypole dancing and gathering wildflowers for floral crowns. Tradition also says that if you place seven types of flowers under your pillow at midsummer, you will dream of your spouse. But who has time to sleep? For the weekend surrounding the solstice, people fill the streets for a never-ending party, washing down pickled herring and dill-laced new potatoes with spiced schnapps and plenty of drinking songs, the dirtier, the better. Celebrations are family-oriented and usually happen out in the countryside but if you’re not lucky enough to snag an invite to someone's home, the open-air Skansen Museum in Stockholm is a good alternative. 6. Tyrol, Austria When summer solstice comes around, Austrians play with fire. Their tradition of lighting bonfires on mountaintops not only looks spectacular, but they’re also rooted in the Middle Ages, where flames were used to ward off bad spirits. In the 1700s, the fires were re-cast to fight against the imminent threat of invasion by Napoleon, and after the victory, Austrians pledged themselves to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Since then, the mountains have been set ablaze annually in dramatic form, save for a brief time when they were outlawed by the Nazis. Today, Austrians still honor the shortest night of the year but have incorporated religious symbols like crosses into the festivities. 7. St. Petersburg, Russia After a long and dark winter, Russians especially look forward to its solstice celebrations, so much so that they kick up their heels for two months straight. During these White Nights, culture lovers come out to the imperial capital of St. Petersburg for free events like opera and classical music performances and concerts held at the Mariinsky Theatre, the Conservatoire and the Hermitage Theatre. A few days after the solstice is the annual Scarlet Sails celebration, with ships and fireworks and musical performances that, in the past, have included big names such as The Rolling Stones. 8. Istria, Croatia Croatia combines the skies, the scientific and the spiritual with their all-night Astrofest, held near the famous observatory in Višnjan. Kicked off by saying goodbye to the sun, celebrations include an evening of nerding out with observatory tours, stargazing, bonfires and digeridoo-woven live music. Mystical creatures are brought to life through storytelling and it’s all backed by the thrum of drum circles that don’t cease until the sun re-emerges the next day.

Budget Travel Lists

14 Free Things to Do in Seattle

Seattle can be expensive. Look in the right places, though, and there are still plenty of free ways to spend time in Emerald City without spending a penny. 1. Explore Pike Place Market Touristy, but justifiably so, Pike Place Market is one of Seattle’s top sights and absolutely free – except for the money you’ll be tempted to spend here. The range of stalls, from fishmongers and florists to food, demonstrates the Port of Seattle’s importance and why it became such a valuable jewel in the Pacific Northwest’s crown. Any day of the year this is a great place to shop and people-watch. 2. Relax a moment in Waterfall Garden Park Waterfall Garden Park was one of Seattle’s first small ‘parklets’ or ‘pocket parks.’ Tucked quietly into the Pioneer Square neighborhood, it has a 22ft waterfall and is a great spot to take a break during a busy day of sightseeing. 3. Tour the Frye Art Museum In addition to free admission and parking, Frye Art Museum provides complimentary tours throughout the week. On your own or with a guide, explore the rotating collections of 19th- and 20th-century American, French, and German paintings and sculptures. 4. Stroll through Olympic Sculpture Park The Space Needle isn’t the only large-scale metal construction in the city; Olympic Sculpture Park, managed by the Seattle Art Museum, is home to over a dozen large artworks, with access free and open to the public every day from dawn until dusk. From the sweeping red Eagle to the unusual Echo, this is a great place to partake of Seattle’s art-loving culture. 5. Wander through Ballard Locks The Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, more commonly known as the Ballard Locks, are more than just an effective link for ships moving between Puget Sound and lakes Union and Washington. In addition to watching the parade of boats using the locks to traverse the waterways, another popular activity is sea-life spotting at the fish ladder section of the locks. 6. Join the Silent Reading Party The first Wednesday of every month, the Sorrento Hotel turns their Fireside Room into a social-yet-quiet literary occasion, when a mix of people claim the couches and armchairs to consume great written work. Everyone is welcome but the event is popular, so it’s worth putting a standing event on your calendar so you don’t forget to turn up early and snag a spot. 7. Take an urban hike at Discovery Park Covering 534 acres near the Magnolia neighborhood, Discovery Park provides a variety of terrains for those wanting a bit of outdoor time in the heart of the city. Choose between forested trails, the rocky beach and exploring the West Point Lighthouse – as far west as you can be within the city limits. All are free and beautifully preserved by the city for your enjoyment. 8. Take an art walk Throughout the summer months, Seattle’s neighborhoods take turns opening their gallery doors for the artistic-minded to explore at will. Pioneer Square galleries open the first Thursday, Belltown hosts on the second Friday each month and Capitol Hill’s event is on the second Thursday. In addition to free gallery access, many local businesses hold daily specials for these nights, making them perfect for a cheap evening out. 9. Take in a Ladies Musical Club performance The Ladies Musical Club exists to further interest in classical music in Seattle through free performances throughout the city. From West Seattle to Wallingford, this women-only group selects and produces a variety of classical music styles, staging shows in smaller, community venues. 10. Get the locals’ view of the skyline There are far cheaper ways to take in the Seattle skyline than by forking out for the Space Needle. Enjoy the view over Lake Union from Gas Works Park while families and dogs frolic on the grassy hills, or contemplate the free but priceless panorama of the entire skyline (Space Needle included) from Kerry Park on Queen Anne Hill. 11. Share your works in progress On the first and third Monday of every month, the mics at Hugo Houseare open to any and all writers in the city through an event called Works in Progress. Listeners are also welcome, though we’ve heard that the stories are not necessarily family friendly – it is a public open mic night after all! 12. Get some free exercise With the great outdoors on their doorstep it’s no surprise that Seattleites love their exercise, and there are plenty of ways to get some – many of them free. If you need somewhere to get back in cycling shape, try a few circuits on the Green Lake Park 2.8mi loop; while runners should head for Myrtle Edwards Park and hit the paths along the shores of Elliot Bay. 13. Get cultural at the Seattle Center Nearly every weekend of the year, the Seattle Center plays host to a variety of events, including many cultural festivals collectively known as Festál. From the Irish Festival in March to the Polish Festival in July and CroatiaFest in October, you can immerse yourself in ethnic food, dance, and celebration, all without spending a dime on admission. 14. Watch the sunset or light your own fire Pyromaniacs can indulge their fiery tendencies in Golden Gardens Park, one of the few public parks that allows open fires (in designated areas). The park also provides one of the best views for sunsets on those days where Seattle is graced with a cloudless sky. The only thing you’ll spend is time deciding on your favorite location to enjoy the moment.

Budget Travel Lists

21 Free Things to Do in Boston

Bostonians pay notoriously high prices for baseball tickets and real estate. But fortunately, budget travelers can experience the best of Boston without paying a cent. Here’s the scoop on 21 free (or nearly free) things to do, see, hear, eat and even drink. 1. Follow the footsteps of revolutionaries on the Freedom Trail The Freedom Trail is the best introduction to Revolutionary War-era Boston. This 2.5-mile, red-brick path winds its way past 16 sites that earned this town its status as the Cradle of Liberty. Follow the trail on your own, or hook up with a free guided tour by the National Park Service. Departing from Faneuil Hall, the tours max out at 30 people, so arrive early to secure your spot. Outside of the tour season, you can download a map to use. Many of the sites along the trail are also free to enter. 2. Sit in the Governor’s Pew in King’s Chapel The stately Georgian architecture of King's Chapel contains a bell crafted by Paul Revere and the prestigious Governor’s Pew, where George Washington once sat. It’s a lovely setting for weekly noontime recitals (Tuesday). Admission is always free, but a $4 donation is recommended. 3. Eat lunch at Boston’s historic marketplace Lunch is not free, but the history lesson is. Take a look around the Great Hall and listen to a ranger talk about historic Faneuil Hall and its role as market and meeting place. Then head to Quincy Market to take your pick from dozens of affordable food stalls. 4. Take a tour of the Massachusetts State House Visit the Massachusetts State House, the so-called `hub of the solar system’ to learn about the state insect (the ladybug) and to pay your respects to the Sacred Cod. Free tours led by The Doric Docents (volunteer tour guides) are Monday through Friday and visit the ceremonial halls, the legislative chambers and the executive branch. 5. Experience a sailor’s life aboard the USS Constitution The USS Constitution is the world’s oldest commissioned warship, and it is docked in the Charlestown Navy Yard. Navy officers lead free tours of the upper decks, where you will learn about the ship's exploits in America’s earliest naval battles. You don’t need money, but you do need a photo ID. 6. Explore the fort and lounge on the beach at Castle Island Castle Island isn't really an island, but a vast, green waterside park with amazing skyline views. The massive Fort Independence is open for exploration and free tours. Otherwise, you can relax on the beach, fish from the pier or dip your toes into the chilly harbor waters. 7. Walk the Black Heritage Trail On Beacon Hill, the 1.6-mile Black Heritage Trail explores the history of abolitionism and African American settlement in Boston. Download a map for a self-guided walking tour; or meet up with the free NPS tour, which departs from the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. 8. Climb to the top of the Bunker Hill Monument The landmark obelisk marks the site of the fateful battle in June 1775 that turned the tides of the War for Independence. Climb the 294 steps of the Bunker Hill Monument to the top for an impressive panorama of city, sea and sky. You’ll expend nothing but energy. 9. Enjoy a day at The Boston Public Library The Boston Public Library was built as a 'shrine of letters’ but it's also a temple of art and architecture. Free guided tours depart from the main entrance; or you can pick up a brochure and guide yourself around the stunning, mural-painted halls. The BPL also hosts author talks, musical performances and other free events. 10. Get a glimpse of Boston’s excellent art collections Boston is considered the Athens of America, so you should probably check out the art. On Wednesdays after 4pm, admission to the Museum of Fine Arts is by donation (pay what you can, though $25 is suggested). On Thursdays after 5pm, the Institute of Contemporary Art hosts Free Thursday Night. 11. Tour JFK's birthplace John F Kennedy was born and raised in this modest clapboard house in Brookline, now listed as the JFK National Historic Site. Listen to Rose Kennedy’s reminiscence, as you peruse the furnishings, photographs and mementos that have been preserved since the Kennedys lived here. Guided tours are half an hour Wednesday through Sunday (9:30am - 5pm). The site will be closed from November 2019 through 2020 for renovations. 12. Get the inside scoop on America’s oldest university Students lead free historical tours of Harvard Yard, also sharing their own perspectives on student life. The one-hour tours depart from the Smith Campus Center. Space is limited, so arrive early during busy seasons. 13. Admire the Longfellow National Historic Site For 45 years, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow lived and wrote poetry in this stately Georgian manor near Harvard Square. The Longfellow National Historic Site is open Wednesdays-Sundays through October 27. The mansion contains many of the poet’s personal belongings, as well as lush period gardens. 14. Enjoy open-air entertainment at the Hatch Memorial Shell The Charles River Esplanade is Boston’s backyard, a fine venue for picnics, bike rides and leisurely strolls. Even better, all summer long, the Hatch Memorial Shell hosts free events like outdoor concerts, family flicks and Dancing in the Park. 15. Hobnob with artists at SoWa First Fridays From the former factories and warehouses in the South End, artists have carved out studios and gallery space. The SoWa Artists Guild hosts an open studio event on the first Friday of every month (5 to 9pm). Come examine the art and mingle with the resident creatives. 16. Sneak a peek inside Fenway Park If you can’t get tickets to the big game, you can still sneak a peek inside Fenway Park. The Bleacher Bar is accessible from the street, with a window looking onto center field. The bar gets packed during games when there’s usually a waiting list for window seating. 17. Winterland fun in Harvard Bundle up! Boston is full of opportunities for winter fun. Havard Common Spaces hosts a Winter Fest at The Plaza which is open and free to the public. Try your hand at ice curling, ice bowling or ice shuffleboard. 18. Grab a cheap and tasty lunch from the Falafel King Two words: free falafel. That’s right, Falafel King customers are treated to a free sample while they wait. If you’re looking for lunch, this hole in the wall is quick and delicious. 19. Sample Boston’s finest on a Samuel Adams Brewery tour Head to Jamaica Plain to see the birthplace of America’s original craft beer. On the Samuel Adams Brewery Classic Tour, learn about the history of the company, witness the brewing process and sample the goods. By 'goods’, we mean frothy lagers, refreshing pilsners and tasty ales. Tickets are first-come, first-serve; tours run Monday - Saturday (11:15am-5pm) and are open to all ages. Must be 21 to drink. The suggested $2 donation is passed on to local charities. 20. Lunch with a side of history at Boston Common Unwind at America's oldest park. Enjoy a family picnic or just relax and people watch. Summertime is for Shakespeare and the winters are for ice skating at Frog Pond. 21. Let your kids romp at the Boston Children's Museum From the Art Studio to the Construction Zone, the Boston Children’s Museum is fun for all. It’s not free, but 'Target Fridays' mean that admission is only $1 on Friday after 5pm.

Budget Travel Lists

7 Things to Do in Detroit

Though its ups and downs, Detroit has never lacked in creativity or industriousness. In fact, you can say that's what made it a world-class city to begin with, what with its trail-blazing motor vehicle industry and, of course, Motown, easily the most globally renowned record label in history. It famously struggled as a city in the years after the recession, but locals are fired up these days and their creativity and entrepreneurial grit have restored Detroit's magnificence. Here are a few things to see, do, taste, and try next time you visit Motor City. 1. Visit a Shrine to American Music Motown Museum (Liza Weisstuch) There are plaques and big signs outside of Berry Gordy’s former house indicating that you’re approaching the Motown Museum, but if they weren’t there, you could easily overlook the house on the none-too-notable West Grand Boulevard. This childhood home of Gordy, founder of Motown, later came to house Studio A, one of music’s most famous rooms in the world. Today, the house is a museum of, if not a shrine to, the iconic label (motownmuseum.org). The main thing to know is that you can only go through om a guided tour, which is offered every 30 minutes. Tour guides, each one an engaging entertainer in his/her own right, take you through the history of the label, from the early careers of Smoky Robinson, the Jackson 5, Diana Ross, so many others, to the heyday of the studio where legends were made. Gallery-esque displays feature treasures like Michael Jackson’s crystal-encrusted glove. It’s also a showcase of crowning Hitsville moments and behind-the-scenes personalities, like the songwriters and etiquette instructor Maxine Powell, who taught the Supremes how to strut and gave the Temptations their polish. The tour finishes up in the renowned studio A, where you can marvel at original recording equipment and Little Stevie Wonder’s piano. You can feel the power within the walls. It’s the same power McCartney felt when he visited and, the guide will tell you, he got down on his knees and kissed the floor. 2. Listen to the Sounds of Detroit Today Northern Lights Lounge (Liza Weisstuch) When you enter Studio A, you’ll see a bass guitar propped upright next to the piano. The base belonged to Dennis Coffey, a Motown session musician who recorded on some of the best known albums in history. Coffey is still alive and playing gigs, and you can catch him each Tuesday at Northern Lights Lounge (northernlightslounge.com), a unpretentious bar with a cozy lodge-meets-rec-room feel, a well-worn slab of mahogany, round booths for groups, and a stage where funk, soul, R&B, and jazz are king. Coffey wrote the book—literally—about being a session musician, which you can buy at the gig. Detroit is like New Orleans in that it’s almost hard to avoid seeing live music. For a full-on concert, check out what’s on at the Masonic Temple (themasonic.com), a vintage gem that Jack White saved from the wrecking ball and turned into an auditorium for contemporary acts. There’s a packed lineup of jazz musicians—local and national—at Baker’s Keyboard Lounge (officialbakerskeyboardlounge.com), said to be the oldest jazz club in the world. Local and national rock bands perform at Smalls (smallsbardetroit.com), an intimate spot with pub grub and pool tables. And check the schedule at Third Man Records, another Jack White endeavor. They often host rock and alternative bands on their in-store stage, some of which are recorded and pressed into exclusive records. 3. Wander Detroit's Oldest Neighborhood, a Hub of Modern Creativity Cork & Gabel (Liza Weisstuch) Historically, Corktown was a vibrant district where Irish immigrants fleeing the potato famine in the 1940s lived and prospered and built Victorian-style homes. The neighborhood, the oldest in Detroit, is anchored by Michigan Central Station, an architectural marvel with marble finishes, soaring arches and 14 marble pillars. A series of mishaps left it derelict in recent decades, but Ford purchased it in 2018, which, in a way, was the ultimate mark of Corktown’s revival. New, hip businesses have opened at a steady clip since the early 2000s. Today, the hip district is a destination for its many restaurants and bars, like the Motor City Wine, a laidback bar/shop with a popular patio and live music most nights; Sugar House, a craft cocktail bar that’s turned out to be an incubator, of sorts, for many bartenders who went on to open their own bars; Astro Coffee, a charming locally-minded café that was one of Corktown’s early revivalists, and Lady of the House, noted chef Kate Williams's restaurant featuring creative American fare and a thoughtful menu of cocktails, beer, and wine. The newest eatery to move in, the gastropub-esque Cork & Gabel, serves a German/Irish/Italian menu in a sweeping industrial-chic space 4. Fun and Games Maryland has duckpin bowling (short, fat-bottom pins, softball-size ball), New England has candlepin bowling (thin pins, slightly larger ball), and Detroit has feather bowling, which sits at the intersection of shuffleboard, bowling, and bocce ball. Long popular in Belgium, it’s said to have arrived in Detroit in the 1930s, brought over by immigrants who gathered at Cadieux Café to hurl a heavy wood object resembling a wheel of cheese down a curved dirt-covered alley at a feather. The Café is still a lively place to try the game—and other Belgian signatures, like steamed mussels and the country’s distinctive beer. If more contemporary sports are your preference, you're in for a treat. Comerica Park, the Detroit Tigers’ stadium, sits smack in the middle of downtown, surrounded by plenty of restaurants and green spaces. Take note: Comercia is celebrated for its food offerings. And as if America’s pastime isn’t kid-friendly enough, this open-air stadium features a carousel and a Ferris wheel. The longstanding Joe Louis Arena, home the Red Wings, the city’s NHL team, and the Pistons (basketball), was demolished years ago and replaced by the sleek Little Caesars Arena, a $862.9 million stadium in Midtown. Rounding out the urban trifecta is Ford Stadium, home of the Lions, Detroit’s NFL team. 5. The Great Outdoors Detroit may be legendary for its motor vehicle industry, but these days, there are plenty of ways to enjoy the outdoors on foot. The Detroit International River Walk, for instance, opened along the Detroit River in 2007 and stands as a model of urban revitalization. The five-and-a-half-mile riverside path passes through once-blighted areas and William G. Milliken State Park and Harbor, which features fishing docks. Attractions like a custom-designed carousel, fountains where kids can splash around in, outdoor performance venues, beautifully landscaped “Garden Rooms,” and public art. There are bike trails as well as walking paths, the latter of which terminate at Belle Isle, a 982-acre island park that separates Michigan from Canada. 6. Cass Corridor: Where Makers Take the Spotlight Third Man Records (Liza Weisstuch) Everyone knows Motown and Ford defined Detroit; a company that carries the torch for the city's defining manufacturing culture is Shinola, a luxury goods maker established in the city in 2011 and known for its exquisite watches, bicycles, leather goods, jewelry, and more. Its watches and watchbands are handmade at a factory in a local historic building. You can take a tour there to learn about the intricate details of Swiss-style watchmaking. Or just marvel at the finished products at the company’s flagship store in Cass Corridor, a pocket of Midtown that was once known for its Victorian mansions, several of which have recently been rehabbed after many years of neglect. The Corridor is a mini-neighborhood, of sorts, with businesses that typify the city’s creativity and industriousness. The focal point of the street is Third Man Records, crowned with a giant radio antennae on the top. Jack White’s studio/retail store that also houses a stage for live performances and a vinyl-pressing plant. (You can see the action behind windows in the store, or sign up for a tour.) Across the street is Nest, a shop that stocks books about the city, locally made jewelry and home goods. 7. Get Cultured One of the excellent docents at the Detroit Institute of Arts, with Diego Rivera's mural "Detroit Industry" (Liza Weisstuch) One of the many things that makes Detroit so visitor-friendly the fact that all its epic cultural institutions sit practically side-by-side. The Cultural Center Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was planned in 1910 and its landmarks endure: the grand Detroit Public Library (1921), a white marble Italian Renaissance-style building; the Beaux Arts-style Detroit Institute of Arts (1927), and the Horace H. Rackham Education Memorial Building (1933), part of the University of Michigan. The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History opened next to DIA in 1965 and the kid-friendly Michigan Science Center, complete with a planetarium, a 4D theater, and hands-on exhibits, opened its doors in 2011. You don’t have to spend much time traveling from place to place, a major boon because each institution is so densely packed with things to see that you’ll need as much time at all of them that you can get.