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Hotel We Love: Little America, Cheyenne, WY

By Liza Weisstuch
January 12, 2022
Hotel with pool outside
Courtesy Little America
This luxe Western oasis offers old-school elegance and world-class golf, a stone's throw from the highway.

If you’re from the western U.S., you’re likely familiar with Little America, which has large, longstanding properties in Salt Lake City, Flagstaff, and Cheyenne. Named for a research station in Antarctica, the company's resorts have a charming “Western luxe” look and feel, with low-slung buildings spread out over grounds—sort of the open-range version of the sprawling properties that made the Catskills famous in the 1950s and '60s. The Cheyenne location is no exception, but its wide prairie views are an added bonus.

THE STORY 

Little America Cheyenne was its own town before hoteliers came along in the first half of the 20th century, transforming the one-time municipality into their inaugural property. The carpeted lobby leans heavily on its Western influences, with couches, a fireplace, and rodeo-themed sculptures and lamps. Restaurants and a shop with cowboy- (and cowgirl-) influenced clothing, jewelry, and paraphernalia are located around the lobby's perimeter.

THE QUARTERS

Among the 188 rooms, there are eight sizes to choose from, and even the smallest of the bunch—the Deluxe King and Deluxe Two Queens—are spacious. Each room is adorned with art chosen by the owners, and larger rooms include a comfy sitting area. The property underwent a renovation in 2006, and all of the rooms were updated to include mini-fridges and microwaves, among other improvements. Additional amenities include a Keurig coffee maker, flat-screen TVs, and complimentary high-speed Wi-Fi. Pet-friendly rooms are available. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD

The resort is equal parts a family hotel suitable for extended stays and an oasis for long-haul travelers and cross-country road-trippers, as it’s located at the intersection of I-80 and I-25. It’s a quick ride (about $10 in an Uber) to Cheyenne Frontier Days Park as well as downtown, so if you’re looking for a night of bar-hopping, you’re covered.

The current proprietors also own Sinclair Oil, a Wyoming refinery and gas-station chain with a number of locations, including one at the end of the hotel’s parking lot, which makes for an easy fill-up before you get back on the road.

FOOD 

Hathaway’s Restaurant and Lounge, a family-friendly, old-school-glam eatery, evolved from the hotel’s original restaurant, Cheyenne’s Coffee Shop and Western Gold Dining Room. It still serves the homemade turkey roll that was early restaurant’s signature, but now it's merely one of many hearty dishes on offer, like prime rib, chicken-fried steak, and lots of burgers, sandwiches, and salads. The menu is also available in the lounge, a low-key space where travelers from around the nation rub elbows. Breakfast at Hathaway's is well-regarded, drawing locals for the weekend brunches, especially the elaborate and abundant affairs on Mother’s Day, Thanksgiving, and Easter.

ALL THE REST

A Golf Association–rated course extends across the property and, accordingly, draws travelers working on their swing. There are sporty activity options beyond the golf course too, from a heated outdoor pool to a cute playground to a modern fitness center. For business travelers, there's a business center with computers and printers as well as plentiful meeting rooms and convention services. 

RATES AND DEETS

Starting at $119.

Little America
2800 West Lincoln Way
Cheyenne, WY 82009
(307) 775-8400 // cheyenne.littleamerica.com 

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Inspiration

Satisfy Your Thirst in South Carolina

South Carolina is home to some of the friendliest, most welcoming locals in America. That means whether you’re visiting a vibrant urban center like Charleston or Columbia, a beautiful coastal retreat like Myrtle Beach or Hilton Head, or a cool small town like Beaufort, you are likely to be offered a cold glass of Sweet Tea, a world-class pint of craft beer, a shot of “white lightning” (a.k.a. moonshine), or other distinctly South Carolina libations. In fact, wetting your whistle in the Palmetto State has never been easier, with the help of the free Satisfy Your Thirst Tour app, and a few pointers for getting the most out of your tour. CRAFT BEER Coast Brewing Co. in Charleston, SC (Courtesy CoastBrewing.com) After a busy day seeing some of South Carolina’s historical sites, hitting a beach or golf course, or paddling one of the state’s scenic waterways, nothing refreshes quite like a chilled pint of artisan-crafted lager, pilsner, ale, or stout. And if that sounds just about perfect right now, you’re in luck: South Carolina offers more than 50 craft breweries, many boasting great food, tours, and canned and bottled beers you can’t pick up at the grocery store or bar. South Carolina’s craft beer scene extends from the coast to the upstate, and its finest products have garnered nationwide attention. Our friends over at Southern Living named Holy City Brewing, in North Charleston, the best in the state, and Beer Advocate gives the thumbs-up to Westbrook Brewing Co., in Mount Pleasant, and Coast Brewing Co., in Charleston. We’re partial to Conquest Brewing Co., in Columbia, for its variety of textures and mythology-inspired names such as Artemis Blonde and Medusa Stout. And besides loving the name River Rat Brewery, we also admire how the Columbia-based establishment offers affordable brewery tours, great nachos, and evocative names like Twisted Lemon Wheat and American Kolsch Story. MOONSHINE & COCKTAILS Peach Moonshine at Carolina Moon Distillery (Courtesy @cmdistillery/Instagram) Not too long ago, producing moonshine in the backwoods of South Carolina was against the law - not just during the Prohibition years, when alcohol production was illegal across the U.S. and illicit distilling could earn a farmer a small fortune in “liquid gold,” but right up until 2009, when state laws finally changed to allow for micro-distilling of the potent spirit known locally as “white lightning” and “corn likker.” These days, there are more than two dozen artisanal stills across the state producing not only classic moonshine but also bourbon, rum, and vodka, making for a lively tasting scene - and some great cocktails. Dark Corner Distillery, in Greenville, is named for the former bootlegging hotbed “dark corner” of South Carolina, and it produces popular flavored whiskies (butterscotch, maple, and beach to name a few) and offers a tasting flight with a side of regional history. Carolina Moon Distillery, in Edgefield, offers tours of its small-batch operations where vodka, bourbon, and a “high octane” moonshine evocatively dubbed Rabbit Spit are produced. Stop by Palmetto Distillery, with a distillery in the city of Anderson and a shop in Myrtle Beach, both offering fun tours and the brand’s signature moonshine. Of course, all this talk of spirits is bound to make you want to raise a good cocktail, right. Across South Carolina, restaurants and bars are crafting signature concoctions. We especially love the Charleston restaurant Prohibition, where you’ll find a vast array of mixed drinks and small-batch spirits. Try the Bacon Maple Old Fashioned or the classic Mint Julep. When you’re in Myrtle Beach, hit the Chemist for science-fiction themed cocktails like Thyme Machine (including gin and thyme-infused ice) and Flux Capacitor (with vodka, blackberry syrup, and mint). WINE South Carolina’s wine scene is lesser known and ready for the spotlight, with vineyards and wineries producing some outstanding bottles from the coastal regions to upstate. Locally grown grapes include scuppernong and muscadine, used in the great wines produced at Duplin Winery, in Myrtle Beach. And some wineries, such as Island Winery, in Hilton Head, make great use of tasty local fruits like berries and peaches to craft highly rated wines. Kick back at a South Carolina wine bar such as Wined It Up, in Beaufort, where you’ll enjoy small plates and the flexibility to try a variety of hand-picked wines in 2-, 4-, or 6-ounce glasses perfect for tasting a little bit of everything. SWEET TEA On the softer side, but potent in its own way, Sweet Tea is one of the most iconic beverages of South Carolina. For the most authentic, local experience, visit Charleston Tea Plantation, on Wadmalaw Island, where, just like visiting a brewery or winery, you can take a charming tour and savor a variety of teas in an elegant tasting room. And remember that although the name Sweet Tea implies a thick, syrupy experience, you can order it lightly sweetened if you prefer. MILK That’s right: Milk. No visit to South Carolina would be complete without a sip or two of the state’s official drink. There’s nothing like a trip to the farmland of upstate South Carolina for a tour of a dairy, such as Happy Cow Creamery, in Pelzer, that kids of all ages will appreciate. And don’t forget one more mouth-watering tasting experience as you try the milk, cheese, and sometimes even ice cream produced at a dairy farm. DOWNLOAD THE FREE ‘SATISFY YOUR THIRST TOUR’ APP Ready to satisfy your thirst in South Carolina? Download the free South Carolina Satisfy Your Thirst Tour app for iOS or Android or visit SatisfyYourThirstSC.com to find breweries, distilleries, wineries, tours and sampling locations and learn about upcoming festivals that celebrate the best in sippable South Carolina.

Inspiration

10 Exquisite Musical Events Worth Traveling to in 2018/19

Whether your idea of “classical music” is a ferocious symphony by Beethoven, the pulsing minimalism of Philip Glass, or a brand-new opera adapted from a Hitchcock thriller (really), the 2018/19 classical music and opera calendar promises to be one of the richest, most diverse ever. Here, 10 noteworthy musical events in travel-worthy destinations across the U.S. 1. Opera Philadelphia’s O18 Festival September 20 - 30, 2018 Opera Philadelphia showed themselves as one of the most interesting companies with last year’s O17 festival. This season’s 018 line-up features "Lucia di Lammermoor" and the world premiere of "Sky on Swings," which brings back the team of composer Lembit Beecher and librettist Hannah Moscovitch, plus a production of Poulenc’s "La Void Humaine" that will include star Patricia Racette singing French art songs. Performances are staged all over, including at the Barnes Foundation art museum and concert (operaphila.org). 2. Daniil Trifonov With the Chicago Symphony October 18 - 20, 2018 Pianist Daniil Trifonov is a legend in the making, and his youth makes that even more exciting—there’s a sense he’s discovering new music and ideas at his every concert. Among many notable performances in North America this season, this appearance with the Chicago Symphony stands out for both his collaborators—the great Chicago Symphony and conductor Marin Alsop—and the material, Prokoviev’s Piano Concerto No. 3. Stick around for the entire concert to hear Copland’s mighty Symphony No. 3 (cso.org). 3. 'Marnie' at the Metropolitan Opera October 19 - November 10, 2018 Five years after composer Nico Muhly’s opera "Two Boys" caused a considerable positive stir at the Met comes "Marnie." Best known as an Alfred Hitchcock film, "Marnie," adapted from a novel by Winston Graham, has the perfect operatic theme of a beautiful young woman who assumes multiple identities. It’s a star turn ripe for the taking by the great mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard. Michael Meyer, who produced the Met’s scintillating "Ratpack Rigoletto," promises an appropriately  cinematic staging (metopera.org). 4. 'Satyagraha' at LA Opera October 20 - November 11, 2018 Composer Philip Glass may be most widely known for his film scores, including most famously "The Hours," but his operas are uniquely beautiful and intriguing. Glass's opera "Satyagraha," about Gandhi, is probably his music beautiful, and for the LA Opera it is the final leg of their stagings of Glass’s opera trilogy on science, religion, and politics. This co-production with the English National Opera and Metropolitan Opera comes from director Phelim McDermott, who has triumphant stagings of Glass's "Einstein on the Beach" and "Akhnaten" under his belt. His "Satyagraha" is a stunning interweaving of evocative settings and history, and features tenor Sean Panikkar in the lead (laopera.org). 5. Yuja Wang Perspectives Series at Carnegie Hall, New York City October 26, 2018 - May 2, 2019 (various dates) The Perspectives Series hands over programming to selected artists, and pianist Yuja Wang’s choices mix expected pleasures with real surprises. Across six concerts, she’ll play Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 5 with the New World Symphony, and premiere a new work from Michael Tilson Thomas (May 1-2); she’ll play duos (Feb. 6 and April 10); and on February 11 she’ll perform with the classical music comedy duo Igudesman & Joo in a concert that will absolutely be something completely different (carnegiehall.org). 6. Celebrating MTT at the San Francisco Symphony November 15, 2018 - June 22, 2019 (various dates) Conductor Micheal Tilson Thomas (a.k.a. MTT) will not be leaving the San Francisco Symphony until the end of the 2020 season, but a long goodbye is in the works for this immensely important musician. Interspersed through the SFS season are signature concerts like MTT’s own "From the Diary of Anne Frank" (Nov 15-18), and ones that feature his special touch with Tchaikovsky, with Symphony No. 4, Feb. 7-9, and Mahler’s glorious Symphony No. 9, June 13-15 (sfsymphony.org). 7. 'Ariadne auf Naxos' at the Cleveland Orchestra January 13, 17 and 19, 2019 The Cleveland Orchestra presents a staged opera performance annually, and for this season it’s "Ariadne auf Naxos," one of Richard Strauss’ most entertaining dramas, combining comedy with beautiful music. A new production made especially for the orchestra comes from opera director Frederic Wake-Walker, and consummate Straussian Franz Welser-Móst will conduct. The terrific young soprano Tamara Wilson, who has a shining, clarion-clear instrument, will sing the dual role of Ariadne and the Diva in the opera within the opera (clevelandorchestra.com). 8. Salonen’s Stravinsky at the Los Angele Philharmonic April 12 - 20, 2019 Among many exciting musical events in Los Angeles, this one stands out for its balance of variety and compactness. Conductor Laureate Esa-Pekka Salonen brings his distinctive vitality and sense of color to three programs at the Los Angeles Philharmonic devoted to works of the titanic, indispensable 20th century composer Igor Stravinsky: Rituals, Faiths, and Myths. "The Rite of Spring" is there, of course, alongside the astonishing "Agon," there will be great choral works for the Faith program, and Myths presents two beautiful and infrequently heard ballet scores, "Orpheus" and "Perséphone" (laphil.com). 9. Music of Conscience at the New York Philharmonic May 26 - June 8, 2019 Jaap van Zweden begins his first seasons as music director, thus already an exciting year for the New York Philharmonic. Their season culminates with the Music of Conscience festival, which explores composers’ responses to political and social turmoil. Opening with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3, and featuring John Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1—his response to the AIDS epidemic—the two weeks end with the world premiere staging of David Lang’s opera "prisoner of the state," his updating of Beethoven's opera "Fidelio" for the 21st century (nyphil.org).10. Cirque de la Symphonie at the Philadelphia OrchestraJune 13 - 14, 2019Dance has been an intimate partner of classical music since before the courtly menuet and trio became permanently entwined into symphonic form. While that has developed since the 18th century, in 2014 the Philadelphia Orchestra took it a leap, literally, farther, with aerialists and acrobats performing in mid-air above the orchestra. This truly spectacular Cirque de la Symphonie program returns for the coming season, along with contortionists, strongmen, and of course dancers. It’s a singular meeting of music making, entertainment, and feats of daring (philorch.org).

Inspiration

7 Exceptional American Food Halls

These days, savvy travelers have a more sophisticated option for fast-casual dining thanks to the growing trend of multi-vendor food halls. A trifecta of choice, atmosphere, and affordability, the best of these large, usually urban-based, eateries offer something for everyone while reveling in the spirit of their surroundings. In addition to showcasing native chefs, products, and cuisines, many food halls also offer locally sourced wine and beer as well as cocktails. Traveling with a family? Now everyone can find something they like. From New York City to Plano, Texas, to Portland, Oregon, this fun and informal way of chowing down offers culinary freedom to tourists and resident foodies alike. 1. Urbanspace Vanderbilt, NYC Nothing says New York City like Grand Central, and this Midtown oasis is the perfect way to get acquainted with the city’s exciting culinary scene. Located on the ground floor of 230 Park Avenue, just one block north of the train station, the 12,000 square-foot food hall (urbanspacenyc.com/urbanspace-vanderbilt/) is packed with local vendors serving up breakfast, lunch, and dinner. There’s even cocktails at Seamore’s NYC, a sustainable seafood purveyor and the newest mezzanine bar. Other notable tenants include Brooklyn Pizza legend Roberta’s; upper east side Greek darling Amali Mou, which serves pork, lamb, chicken, and veggie gyros; designer donut producer Dough dishing South American flavors like hibiscus and tropical chile. Or check out Asian eats from Mr. Bong Beijing Street Foods, Tukami Taco, Hai Street & Co., kbbq by Karilla, and Bangkok Bar. 2. Pine Street Market, Portland, OR (@pinestreetmarketpdx/Instagram)Located in the historic Carriage & Baggage Building in downtown Portland, this cavernous food hall (pinestreetpdx.com) is an ode to the city’s varied dining scene and celebrated indie spirit. The industrial ground floor, which housed a string of Portland nightclubs since the 1980’s, is now home to nine Portland-based vendors, many of which are offshoots of local restaurants. Taking center stage, Olympia Provisions Annex pairs sausages and foot-long dogs with craft cocktails, Champagne and a well-chosen wine list. But don’t miss other standouts like Tokyo ramen joint Marukin; soft-serve wizard WizBangBar, specializing in magic-dip shells infused with freshly-shaved Oregon black truffles; Kim Jong Smokehouse, a Top-Chef helmed mash-up of Korean and Texas BBQ featuring a scorched rice noodle bibimbap bowl; and Mexican-inspired Pollo Bravo serving up rotisserie chicken and tapas-sized sides like papas bravos and salty/spicy chicken and serrano ham croquettes. 3. Legacy Hall, Plano, TX Nobody can accuse this Plano food hall of being modest. A giant three-story dining destination in the Legacy West, a business district, Legacy Hall (legacyfoodhall.com) proffers access to over 20 food and drink vendors, including award-winning chefs like John Tesar. Long known for Knife, his Dallas steakhouse, Knife Burger is his food hall debut. In addition to its size, this extensive space is courting Millennials with cutting edge features. To whit: it operates on a no-cash basis and offers a refillable gift card called a Hall Pass. It’s a nifty place to hit during happy hour, as there are nine bars to choose from, including one dedicated to cocktails made with Texas-based Tito’s Vodka. Happily, the food is just as momentous. Favorites include Freshfin Poke Co. for build-your-own Poke; Tex-Mex inspired FAQ (flautas and quesadillas) known for modern, authentic fillings like Texas brisket and chicken chorizo; and the Dallas-offshoot of Sea Breeze Lobsta’ and Chowda House, featuring a wild caught lobster roll, thick with tarragon and celery-rich mayo and topped with luscious drawn butter. 4. Block 16 Urban Food Hall, Las Vegas, NV What happens in Vegas may stay in Vegas, but nobody has been keeping quiet about the city’s massive and evolving restaurant scene. A plethora of upscale eateries can be found in Sin City, fronted by marquee names like Nobu Matsuhisa, Guy Savoy, Wolfgang Puck, Rick Moonen and Mario Carbone. It only goes to follow that a food hall was the next step to entice the fast-casual connoisseur. Enter Block 16 Urban Food Hall (cosmopolitanlasvegas.com/block16), a massive dining complex recently opened on the Las Vegas Strip, inside The Cosmopolitan’s Boulevard Tower. With six regional eateries offering a small-format taste of their chef’s standout foods and drinks, you’ll find foodie faves like Andy Ricker’s Vietnamese cult classic Pok Pok Wing showcasing its well-known crispy fried chicken wings smothered in fish sauce and sugar; New Orleans’s District: Donuts. Sliders. Brew., serving 100 rotating doughnut flavors as well as handmade biscuit sandwiches and zippy nitro cold brew; and Takashi Segawa’s Tekka Bar: Handroll & Sake turning out its signature spicy, creamy, crunchy Tekka Tuna roll and a wide range of sake to wash it down. 5. Workshop, Charleston, SC Workshop (workshopcharleston.com) was originally founded as a rotating, fancy food court to help stoke the creative fires of local chefs. Now a daring food hall housing six kitchens with five stalls, it also doubles as an incubator for new business ideas and concepts from creative locals. And because the stands are swapped out each season, it fosters a fun, exploratory, and adventurous atmosphere for foodies of all stripes. The current line-up includes Thai Phi, the brick and mortar debut from the Vietnamese food truck of the same name, a Charleston favorite. Or hit Pink Bellies, where you can munch on crispy, panko-encrusted avocado fries and fried chicken skins with a spicy chili sauce bath, or Cuban/Southern eatery Spanglish Cuban Kitchen, which focuses solely on southern ingredients like the Edwards Country ham and TN Alpine cheese in the melty, chewy El Cubano sandwich. Thursday through Saturdays catch Merrows Garden Bar, a pop-up pouring a rotating selection of organic, biodynamic and small-batch wines by the glass or bottle. 6. The Wynwood Yard, Miami, FL Al fresco dining is nothing new for Miami’s swinging restaurant culture. And though the urge to see and be seen has always gone hand in hand with the tropical swagger of the city’s culinary scene, the Wynwood Yard (thewynwoodyard.com) is a breath of fresh air—combining pop-up food stands with the cutting-edge art, entertainment, design, and entrepreneurial communities. This summer brought Charcoal, the food hall's first full-service restaurant, offering a beer garden, tapas, and a rotating, wholly seasonal menu of local meat, poultry, fish, and produce. Other current stalls include World Famous House of Mac, known for its indulgently creamy pasta bowl packed with five melted cheeses and truffles. (There’s also a vegan version.) Can’t make up your mind? Try the Friday night Taste of the Yard. $25 will score you five samples of food and drink. 7. Revival Food Hall, Chicago, IL This 24,000 square-foot food hall (revivalfoodhall.com) and marketplace located in the Chicago Loop occupies the first floor of the historic National building, a circa-1907 bank designed by legendary architect Daniel Burnham. A varied collection of 15 stalls feature many spin-offs of neighborhood restaurants as well as some wholly new concepts from up-and-coming local chefs. The newest stands include Lito’s Empanadas, serving up elevated Mexican turnovers filled with everything from ground beef, rice, and a slightly spicy salsa to a blend of apples, caramel and cinnamon sugar. There's also Duck Inn’s new concept, Duck Inn Dogs, revolving around specialty beef and duck fat hot dogs with seasonal toppings like kimchi and house-made pickled hot peppers. Debuting in September, cutting-edge sushi spot Tomi will also feature a robot which quickly assembles high-quality rolls for a reasonable price.

Inspiration

A New York Fashion Week Fantasy Ride

This is the stuff that New York Fashion Week dreams are made of—or any week, for that matter.In fashion Inspired by the spring/summer 2019 collection from Alice + Olivia, a fashion-forward high-end women’s clothing brand, Booking.com has partnered with the company to create “Passport to Wonderland,” on the Calypso, a posh 74-foot yacht docked at New York's Chelsea Piers that’s hosted glitterati like Kate Winslet, Will Smith, Taylor Swift, and Henry Kissinger, to name just a few. At 5PM on September 6th and 7th, you can play your luck and try to score one of the exclusive reservations for a $59 room on the yacht.  A not-to-be-missed chance to live the yacht life for a night Yes, $59. On each of those days at 5 p.m. EST, Booking.com will release a one-night stay on the Calypso for September 12th and 13th, respectively. The stay includes a shopping spree at the Alice + Olivia boutique. Click here to toss your hat--your ultra-stylish couture hat, that is -- into the ring for a chance to win.