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9 Ethnic Neighborhoods With Incredible International Cuisine

By The Budget Travel editors
updated September 29, 2021
restaurant on corner
Viocara/Dreamstime
Think globally, eat locally.

Thanks to America's beautifully diverse immigrant population, more types of cuisines are available to U.S. diners than ever before—which is great news for those who like to explore the world through food. You can't always hop on a plane and experience a new culture in situ, but look closer to home, and the odds are good you'll find the corresponding fare on these shores. From more familiar flavors like Polish and Korean to lesser-known ones like Bukharian and Hmong, here's where ambitious eaters can get their next fix—no passport required.

1. AVONDALE, CHICAGO: Little Poland

Industrial smokestacks and ornate church steeples make up the skyline of Avondale, a largely Polish neighborhood in northwest Chicago. Murals depicting Eastern European traditions bring color to the streetscape, once a drab strip of manufacturers like Florsheim Shoes. Polish immigrants started moving to the neighborhood after the Civil War, and though immigration has slowed in the last few decades as Poles started finding greater opportunities in other parts of Europe, the culture here remains strong, and restaurants and food markets sit as cornerstones of the neighborhood. Staropolska, which was given a makeover a few years ago, remains one of the area’s most traditional. Its extensive menu includes all the staples, like smoked cheese, herring, schnitzel, and pierogi with various fillings. At Kurowski’s Butcher Shop and Rich’s Bakery, a veritable emporium, there's almost always a line at the meat counter for the celebrated kielbasa, smoked sausage, and ham, so make the most of your time and stock up for the trip home.

2. ANNANDALE, VIRGINIA: Korean food

As a gathering place for diplomats and global leaders, it makes sense that Washington, D.C., and its surrounds would be hotspots for international fare. Few, however, have as significant a concentration of a single regional cuisine as Annandale, Virginia, located 13 miles from metro D.C., where Korean restaurants line the streets. D.C. locals will point you to high-profile spots like Honey Pig and Bon Chon Chicken, but there’s plenty more for the adventurous eater to discover. Jajangmyun, a noodle dish with fermented black bean sauce, is the calling card at Jang Won. Sok Jip, a seemingly unremarkable shop in a strip mall, is the go-to for samgyetang, a whole young chicken that's stuffed with garlic, ginseng, and red dates and served in its own broth. Any meal is best wrapped up with pat bing soo, a shaved ice indulgence with condensed milk, mochi, fruit, and red bean paste. Shops serving the treat are abundant.

3. PHILADELPHIA: Little Africa

In most cities, ethnically distinct neighborhoods emerge informally and take on an identity casually. While Little Africa in Southwest Philadelphia started out that way, it’s become a district with an official city-ordained distinction. The telephone poles in this 10-square-mile community are festooned with flags of many African countries and the Caribbean. Amid the West African grocery shops, hair salons, and travel agencies advertising trips to Accra and Dakar sit restaurants specializing in the many foods from Africa. The flavors of Senegal are showcased at Kilimandjaro, known for Senegalese street food like plates of small pieces of spiced, roasted meats. African Small Pot features a mix of West African seafood and kebabs. A medley of traditions and flavors blend at Le Mandingue, where the chefs hail from Liberia, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and elsewhere. And that's just to name a few. In the warmer months, the sidewalks of Woodland Ave, the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare, fill with people lined up to buy kebabs and other spicy bites from popup grills.

4. PATERSON, NEW JERSEY: Little Lima

Across the river from Manhattan, just 20 miles from the Lincoln Tunnel, New Jersey’s third-largest city is home to a diverse population, but it’s perhaps best known for its Peruvian community. Paterson was once a player in the textile-manufacturing industry, and in the 1950s, it drew many Peruvian emigrants in search of employment. They settled downtown in what would become known as Little Lima and soon opened businesses and restaurants of their own. In 2016, a two-block section of Market Street was officially designated as Peru Square, and today, an estimated 30,000 peruanos call the Silk City home. Here, you’ll find traditional fare like ceviche, lomo saltado (a stir-fry of steak, onions, and tomatoes), and stewed guinea pig at La Tia Delia, a longtime local favorite; crisp-skinned rotisserie chicken with a kicky ají amarillo–laced sauce at D’Carbon; and sweet treats like mazamorra morada, a purple corn–based pudding, at Dulcemente Peruano. Pro tip: Carry cash, as many spots don’t take cards. And if you're in town in July, join the 7,000-plus crowd that floods the streets for the annual Peruvian Parade.

5. REGO PARK, QUEENS: Bukharian food

Countless noted food writers have sung the praises of Queens, New York City’s most diverse borough, according to census data. (Linguistic experts have estimated that nearly 800 languages are spoken there.) Some have even pegged it for having more exciting food choices than Brooklyn or Manhattan. One of the more unique cuisines to be found here is in Rego Park, where there’s a large population of Bukharian Jewish emigrants from former Soviet republics of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan, as well as Afghanistan and western China, regions once home to Silk Road cities. Their kosher restaurants and bakeries line what’s known as Bukharian Broadway (aka 108th Street) and offer staple dishes, mostly based on rice, lamb, potatoes, carrots, and spices (think: cumin, paprika, and chili) influenced by Silk Road stops in China and India. Try lamb kebabs; shurpa, a cumin-spiked beef soup; rice pilaf, often of the fragrant, fluffy variety; and traditional lepeshka, a chewy bread. Just note that many restaurants close from Friday night to Saturday night for the Sabbath.

6. JACKSON HEIGHTS, QUEENS: Indian food

In the bustling neighborhood of Jackson Heights, Queens, the main subway station is above ground. The moment you step out of the train and onto the platform, you can smell the curry wafting from the restaurants that fan out from the frenzied intersection below. Once you get down to street level, your other senses are ignited by colorful displays in the windows of high-end sari shops and Indian music blaring from storefronts. Come to shop, stay to dine. The Indian restaurants range from sweeping eateries that look like banquet halls to much more modest counter-service curry shops and everything in between. Jackson Diner is the most well-known of the former, packing in crowds for a daily all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. Indian restaurants definitely dominate, thanks largely to a wave of immigrants in the 1970s, but people from other nations followed, as evidenced by the neighborhood's many Tibetan restaurants and food trucks. Don't leave here without trying a plate of momos, meat-filled plump dumplings. Amdo's, a longstanding food truck beneath the subway tracks, is run by a former monk. He sells a plate of eight that will set you back $5.

7. ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA: Hmong food

For thousands of years, the Hmong (pronounced mung), an ethnic group, have lived in southwestern China without a nation to call their own. In the mid-1600s, under heavy persecution, they migrated to Laos, Thailand, and other nearby countries. Due to a series of events after the Vietnam War, the U.S. helped them resettle as refugees, and today, Minnesota has the second largest population in the country, mostly concentrated in St. Paul’s Frogtown neighborhood. Considering that the Hmong didn’t have a written language until the 1950s and traditions were passed down orally, the city's many markets and eateries serve as something of a living history museum. Sample the rich heritage at the Hmongtown Marketplace’s vibrant food court or the pavilion at Hmong Village, where there are many options for classic dishes like larb, a minced meat and mint salad that originated in Laos, khaub poob, a curry noodle dish, and Hmong barbecue. There are myriad restaurants and delis to choose from, too.

8. MIAMI: Little Havana

Since the Cuban Revolution of 1959, a reported 700,000 Cubans have made their home in south Florida, and the local food scene has never been the same. Little Havana, a neighborhood west of downtown, is Miami’s epicenter of Cuban culture, especially the vibrant area around colorful Calle Ocho, an historic street. Shop for hand-rolled cigars and Latin records, then indulge in some of the best Cuban food in the country. The hugely popular restaurant and bakery Versailles, for instance, offers an extensive menu that's a celebration of traditional island fare, from hearty plates like ropa vieja (a stew of shredded beef, onions, and peppers in a wine and tomato broth) and picadillo (ground beef sauteed with raisins and olives) to what some deem to be the best Cubano sandwiches in the city. Nearby, El Cristo delivers equally authentic dishes like roast pork and empanadas. (Don’t skip the plantains.) For dessert, hit the iconic Velvet Crème Doughnuts or grab an overflowing cone from the artisanal Azucar Ice Cream Company. Too many options? Sign up for a neighborhood food tour and let an expert set the itinerary for you.

9. WHITE CENTER, SEATTLE: Cambodian food

dreamstime_m_104420160.jpg?mtime=20180924184947#asset:103329(Vladzymovin/Dreamstime)

White Center, a neighborhood in west Seattle, is home to a diverse community, including the city’s biggest Cambodian population, which emerged in the 1980s once the Khmer Rouge fell from power, the genocide ended, and refugees arrived in the US. While rising housing prices in Seattle have kickstarted gentrification here, a number of Cambodian businesses are still going strong alongside the Thai restaurants, Vietnamese cafés, and Salvadorian bakeries that make up the historic business district. Sample regional Khmer fare at Queen’s Deli, known for its spicy Phnom Pehn noodles and samlor kako, a ratatouille-like dish, and browse the extensive grocery aisles at Samway Market, a veritable East Asian food museum.

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Northeast Wineries: 10 Vineyards That Are Changing the Wine Game

The Northeast region has been an up-and-coming wine area for some time and is finally getting the attention it deserves. With more vineyards opening and notable established wineries expanding from Vermont, Connecticut and New York down to New Jersey and Maryland, you may even call it the “East Coast Napa.” Your hardest decisions will be which vineyard to visit first and if you should order just one glass of wine or an entire flight. 1. Castello Di Borghese; Cutchogue, NY Soak up the history at Castello Di Borghese, the oldest Bordeaux vineyard on the North Fork of Long Island. The 100-acre farm is well known for its expansive collection of Bordeaux and gives history tours at the vineyard for guests to learn about the area and its rich past. The winery also draws a huge art crowd with a gallery in the tasting room that offers regular art shows featuring local artists. (castellodiborghese.com) 2. DiGrazia Vineyards; Brookfield, CT Want to learn about the winemaking process? DiGrazia Vineyards offers free tours of the organic vineyard by founder and original winemaker, Dr. Paul DiGrazia. >span class="s4"> Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy wines on their terrace. (digraziavineyards.com) 3. Channing Daughters; Bridgehampton, NY Tucked away in the picturesque East End in Bridgehampton, Channing Daughters is well known for having a wide array of whites, rosé, reds, orange or skin contact, pet nat and sparkling wine. The vineyard also features a sculpture garden that draws guests to roam through the vineyard and enjoy Walter Channing’s artwork, including a massive 40-foot rocket. (channingdaughters.com) 4. Shelburne Vineyard; Shelburne, VT Shelburne Vineyard started 35 years ago when Ken Albert leased three acres from Shelburne farms, believing that viticulture could be a success in Vermont. Winemaker Ethan Joseph now produces reds, whites, rosés, and even ice wines, which are dessert wines produced from grapes that have been frozen on the vine. Don’t miss out on Ethan’s other label, Lapetus, which focuses on natural resources and experimental wines of Vermont. (shelburnevineyard.com) 5. Wölffer Estate; Sagaponack, NY Established in 1987, Christian Wölffer started Wölffer Estates as a small operation; today that little dream has turned into the largest vineyard in the heart of the Hamptons. Wölffer has an expansive collection of delicious rosés, and has created a pink gin using their famed rosé as the gin base. The winery also has an outstanding summer program, including events like yoga in the vines, music, and special wine-paired chef dinners at the estate. (wolffer.com) 6. Unionville Vineyards; Ringoes, NJ While New Jersey’s nickname is the “Garden State,” when you think of New Jersey, a bustling wine region most likely doesn’t come to mind. But that is, in fact, changing very quickly. Unionville Vineyards sits on an 88-acre farm that was once the largest peach orchard in the U.S. They showcase single-vineyard bottlings of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and have a growing portfolio dedicated to Rhône blends and varietals, which are not to be missed. (unionvillevineyards.com) 7. Wild Arc Farm; Pine Bush, NY The husband-and-wife team behind Wild Arc Farm left the Big Apple in 2016 to give their green thumbs a try in the Hudson River Valley in upstate New York. With little to no experience, they took the task to another level when they decided to farm biodynamic and permaculture-focused wines. This gave them the map to create world-class natural wines, a process that avoids using additives and filtration. The farm is opening a tasting room in 2019 and currently its wines can be purchased online and in restaurants, shops, and bars listed in the “Find” section of its website. (wildarcfarm.com) 8. Old Westminster Winery; New Windsor, MD It’s a true family affair at Old Westminster Winery in New Windsor, Maryland. Starting a vineyard was Jay and Virginia Baker’s dream. They planted their first vines in 2011 with their three children, who now fully run the winery. It was such a success that the family opened a massive tasting room in 2015, where they offer live music and local food trucks and have even put out a line of canned wine. Yes, that’s a thing now and you’re going to love it. (oldwestminster.com) 9. Liten Buffel; Middleport, NY Liten Buffel vineyard (meaning “little buffalo” in Swedish) keeps their natural winemaking process quite simple, with no filtration or additives. But the western New York winery’s natural wines are anything but just simple. Opening in 2017, its mission is straightforward: to make the best all-natural wine possible. Make an appointment at their tasting room to try their Pinot Noir or maybe a little Riesling? (litenbuffel.com) 10. Heart & Hands Winery; Union Springs, NY When you arrive at Heart & Hands Winery, you can count on a warm welcome from the vineyard’s mascot, Cailza, a Greater Swiss Mountain Dog. The small boutique winery is a reflection of its name, with husband-and-wife team Tom and Susan Higgins committed to producing cool-climate wines that express the flavors of their Finger Lakes region. The winery’s handcrafted wines focus on Pinot Noir and Riesling, from which they create still and sparkling wines. (heartandhandswine.com)

Travel TipsBudget Travel Lists

11 Fabulously Free Things to Do in New York City This Summer

We wish we could find you a free plane ticket to New York City—and a complimentary hotel room when you get here—but once you're in town, NYC rolls out a never-ending supply of amazing activities that most travelers would be more than happy to pay for, but don't have to. Whether it's world-class Shakespeare, a refreshing boat ride, an unforgettable evening at a museum, or just stretching out on the lawn at a relaxing Midtown oasis, summer in the city has never been more affordable. 1. Shakespeare in the Park The Bard's Coriolanus (July 16 through August 11) will give audiences the opportunity to hear Elizabethan drama presented in the open air, as it was in Shakespeare's day, at the outdoor Delacorte Theatre in Central Park. All tickets to the play, a harrowing tale of democracy under siege by a despotic leader, are free and are distributed in a number of ways, including a line at the theater and online ticketing. To find out how to nab your tickets, visit shakespeareinthepark.org. 2. Staten Island Ferry Did you know that you can get a boat tour of New York Bay, complete with views of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, and cool off in the salty breezes? Stop—there's no need to reach for your wallet. New York's iconic Staten Island Ferry makes regular trips between lower Manhattan and the borough of Staten Island free of charge. For schedules, visit siferry.com. 3. The High Line (Francoisroux/Dreamstime) Psst! In recent years, when you mention how much you love, say, Central Park or Bryant Park to a New Yorker, they may reply, with just a touch of smug, "Well, have you been to the High Line?" This former elevated freight rail line has been converted into a unique public park that runs down the West Side of Manhattan from 30th Street to the West Village, with multiple access points, including wheelchair accessibility, along the way. Although you may not find free Shakespeare or a carousel up there, the chance to see the city from a different angle—included guided walking tours and Tuesday-night stargazing—is priceless. And free. Visit thehighline.org to learn more. 4. New York Botanical Garden All day each Wednesday, and from 9 to 10 a.m. each Saturday, the New York Botanical Garden, in the Bronx, opens its grounds to visitors free of charge. You can hop a subway train or Metro North's Harlem line from Grand Central Terminal to get there, and walk the winding paths among the trees and flowering plants. You'll have to pay to get into the greenhouses or special events—but on a lovely summer's day, the grounds will likely offer more than enough flora to keep you satisfied. Learn more about the botanical garden's summer programs at nybg.org. 5. Central Park Every single day of the summer, Central Park's calendar is packed with activities like catch-and-release fishing, guided tours of gardens and wild spaces, concerts, theater, and more—not to mention the fact that the park also hosts the charmingly manageable Central Park Zoo, a carousel, puppet theater, and, oh yeah, a museum you may have heard of... the Metropolitan Museum of Art (not free, but residents of the Tri-State area can pay what they wish, and the museum is always free to students with ID). But, honestly, the best way to enjoy Central Park is to wander its paths with someone you love, discovering its ponds (including the one where Stuart Little competed in a miniature-boat race), bridges, and public sculptures (such as the breathtaking Bethesda Fountain, where the closing scene of Angels in America takes place) as you go. If you're the type who must plan ahead, you'll find maps and a somewhat overwhelming schedule of events on the park's official site at centralparknyc.org. 6. Summerstage Got a little time on your hands? How about a free concert? Or dance recital? Or how about dozens of free performances in public parks across all five of New York City's boroughs (The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island)? Summerstage arranges an incredible array of free entertainment each year, including music, dance, and comedy. Find a few—or a few dozen—that sound good to you at cityparksfoundation.org/summerstage. 7. Grand Central Terminal At the corner of 42nd Strett and Vanderbilt Avenue in Midtown, you'll find an architectural treasure that's worth a visit even if you're not planning on hopping on a train. Grand Central Terminal's main hall has the open, uplifting feeling of a cathedral interior, and if you're lucky enough to visit on a sunny, day, you'll see the classic image of sunlight pouring in the building's iconic windows, illuminating the bustle below. For a schedule of the building's award-winning, absolutely free walking tours, visit grandcentralpartnership.org. 8. New York Public Library Not just a collection of books—though it is quite a collection of books—the New York Public Library's main building at the corner of 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue also hosts numerous free art and history exhibits with materials from its extensive collection of drawings, paintings, maps, manuscripts, and bound books. If you're a fan of the film Ghostbusters, the building will feel eerily, and comically, familiar. And don't forget to pay the sculpted lions outside a visit. Visit nypl.org for a schedule of exhibits and special events. 9. Bryant Park (Stuart Monk/Dreamstime) Right behind the main library, Bryant Park is an oasis of green—and blood-pressure-lowering serenity—in the midst of Midtown. A children's carousel imported from France plays Edith Piaf recordings as the kids whirl around on beautifully carved and painted horses, bunnies, and cats, and there are a few spots to buy lunch or dinner in the park. But a seat by the fountain on a hot summer day is just about all it takes to relax and recharge—as many New Yorkers do on their lunch hours. The park's summer film festival presents a free movie every Monday night—bring a blanket and a picnic dinner, and get there early to nab a spot on the lawn where you can enjoy a classic like Coming to America, Goodfellas, and Anchorman. To find out what's going on at the park, visit bryantpark.org. 10. St. Patrick's Cathedral As long as you remember that you're stepping into a house of worship (hats off, voices low), a stop at St. Patrick's is a lovely way to escape the summer heat and hoards of shoppers on Fifth Avenue. Religious sculptures, stained glass windows, and soaring architecture can almost convince you that you've stepped into a time machine—or been transported to a European capital. Visit saintpatrickscathedral.org for a schedule of events, including masses and concerts. 11. National Museum of the American Indian New Yorkers who envy Washingtonians for their free access to the Smithsonian museums are forgetting that Manhattan has a Smithsonian museum of its own: the National Museum of the American Indian. Located downtown at the Alexander Hamilton Custom House, the museum is devoted to the history and culture of America's native peoples and in addition to permanent exhibits also offers regular music and dance presentations. Visit nmai.si.edu/visit/newyork to learn more.

Budget Travel Lists

10 Delicious Food Factory Tours

You probably spotted Ben & Jerry's ice cream, Snyder's Pretzels, and Tabasco Sauce on your last stroll through a supermarket. They're universally available products, but did you know that in most cases, each is made in one single production facility? From Connecticut to California, iconic food companies offer tours of their factories to give you an up-close look at how they're made. 1. Ben & Jerry's: Waterbury, Vermont For ice-cream fiends and casual consumers alike, a visit to the Ben & Jerry’s production facility in Vermont is a veritable pilgrimage. The factory typically cranks out its dairy delights on a daily basis, but guided tours run regardless of whether or not ice cream is being made—and yes, you’ll get to sample the wares either way. Afterwards, stop by the gift shop for some swag, order a full-size cone at the scoop shop, and pay your respects to pints of yesteryear at the Flavor Graveyard. If that’s not enough, go for the VIP Flavor Fanatic Experience, a hands-on affair that includes a tour, time in the lab where you’ll help create a flavor, and a tie-dyed lab coat of your very own. 30-minute guided factory tours run seven days a week, with varied hours depending on the season and tickets available on a first-come, first-served basis. Adults ages 13-59, $4; seniors 60 and up, $3; kids under 12, free. Flavor Fanatic Experience, $175 per person. benjerry.com 2: Snyder Pretzels: Hanover, Pennsylvania German and Swiss German immigrants settled in Pennsylvania in the 18th century, and their culinary traditions still remain. There’s the Yuengling brewery, for one, the oldest brewery in the country. And then there are pretzels. Pennsylvania produces about 80% of pretzels sold in America and perhaps no company is better known than Snyder’s of Hanover, which opened in 1909 and still uses some of the original recipes. In addition to a crash course in the early commerce of Pennsylvania, a visit to the factory provides a peek at how the pretzels are made, with at look at the raw materials, the historic ovens where they bake massive amounts of the twists each day, and the elaborate packing system. Head off with a free bag of the snack and you’ll never look at a vending machine the same way again. Free 30 minutes tours offered at 10:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 1:30 p.m., and 2:00p.m. Tuesday through Thursday; reservations required. snydersofhanover.com. 3. Jelly Belly: Fairfield, California From birthday cake to dirty dishwater, toasted marshmallow to stinkbug, Jelly Belly is known for its out-there flavors, and if you’ve ever wondered how those mind-boggling combinations came to be, a visit to Fairfield is in order. Self-guided tours overlooking the factory are available every day, but to see it in full swing, visit on a weekday, when the quarter-mile floor is in operation. High-def videos, interactive games and exhibits, and free samples round out the experience; there’s even a jelly-bean art gallery on the premises, and a café serving bean-shaped pizzas and burgers. For a more in-depth look at the candy-making experience, enroll in Jelly Belly University, which will get you down on the factory floor for a guided tour. The factory runs Monday through Friday, but free self-guided tours are available every day from 9:15 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. JBU tour, $59 per person; reservations required. jellybelly.com 4. PEZ: Orange, Connecticut This iconic sweet started in 1927 as a small peppermint-candy operation in Austria (“PEZ” is actually an abbreviation of “pffefferminz,” the German word for peppermint), and it's become a global phenomenon that continues to intrigue. Fun fact: In 1993, the first pop-culture auction at Christie’s featured old dispensers. Trivia like that abounds at the PEZ factory’s visitor center in Orange, Connecticut. There are interactive exhibits and, of course, the largest collection of Pez dispensers on Earth, including many vintage items. The museum-like display overlooks the packaging production area, and “in-depth candy demonstrations” wrap up with samples of freshly made sweets. Visitors Center open 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Adults $4; $3 kids 3-6; free under 3. Demos are offered daily at 1:15 PM, 2:15PM, 2:45PM, and 3:15PM and cost $3. us.pez.com 5. Tabasco Sauce: Avery Island, Louisiana On bucolic Avery Island, about 140 miles west of New Orleans, there are vast expanses of sustainable hot-pepper fields, an oak-tree jungle, and the fifth-generation family-run factory that annually turns out enough "Cajun ketchup" to reap $200 million in worldwide sales. A visit here offers more than a look at the production facility. The 10-stop self-guided tour gets you access to the museum, which tells the story of the iconic condiment, beginning in 1868 when Edmund McIlhenny created a pepper sauce to jazz up the lackluster fare of the Reconstruction South, as well as the greenhouse, the mash house (where you’re offered a face mask because of the stinging pepper heat in the air), the blending and production facility, the barrel warehouse, a conservatory, and more. Wrap up the day with dinner at Tabasco Restaurant 1868 and a shopping spree at the country store. Self-guided tours offered daily from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tickets $5.50. tabasco.com/visit-avery-island/ 6. Celestial Seasonings: Boulder, Colorado The Celestial Seasonings production plant in Boulder is situated on Sleepytime Drive, but a visit here is nothing less than invigorating. Free, daily 45-minute tours give you a close-up look at the process of tea making—cleaning, cutting, sifting, blending, and packaging the herbs, spices, and tea leaves that are shipped all over the world to make 1.6 billion (yes, billion) cups of tea each year. You’ll also visit the sampling bar, where the list includes 100 kinds of tea. Should you need fortification before you get on your way, check out the Celestial Café, which offers an extensive salad bar and lots of grilled items. It’s adorned with original paintings of the images you'll recognize from the packaging, some of which you’ll also find on the memorabilia in the adorable shop. Free tours run every hour on the hour from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sunday. celestialseasonings.com/visit-us 7. Taza Chocolate: Somerville, Massachusetts The hand-carved granite millstone takes center stage at the tour of the Taza Chocolate factory, a small but mighty facility just outside Boston. You'll learn that the primitive-looking contraption grounds the cacao beans to make the brand's signature chocolate discs, a uniquely gritty, tasty treat that pays tribute to the way chocolate was originally made. Expert guides will explain the fair-trade philosophies that dictate how ingredients are sourced, and needless to say, the tour includes a tasting. The chocolate-grinding room is on view from the shop. As to be expected from a chocolate factory, a visit here is particularly kid-friendly, with activities like Cacoa Scouts Bingo and Chocolate Story Time offered on the weekends. All that's missing is Charlie, Grandpa Joe, and Willie Wonka. Intro to Stone Ground Chocolate tour runs Tuesday through Sunday at 2:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m., and 4:00 p.m. $8 per person; reservations required. Cacao Scouts Bingo is $6; Story Time is free. tazachocolate.com 8. Holualoa Kona Coffee Company: Holualoa, Hawaii What's not to love about fresh roasted coffee and beautiful island environs? At the heart of the Big Island’s Kona coffee belt is the Holualoa Kona Coffee Company, perched on a hilltop overlooking the coast and producing organically farmed java, milled and roasted on site. Tours are self-guided, so caffeine connoisseurs can wander through the orchards at their own pace (no herbicides or pesticides are used on the grounds, and only organic fertilizers, so you can linger without any chemical concerns). Be sure to check out the mill, then visit the packing room and gift shop to sip a free cup of joe and pick up a bag or two of beans to take home as a souvenir. Free self-guided tours run Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. konalea.com 9. Tillamook Creamery: Tillamook, Oregon Tillamook, Oregon's largest tourist attraction, makes cheese, ice cream, yogurt, sour cream, and butter for a daily audience of 10,000-some visitors annually. Now, after a major architectural upgrade, the main production facility boasts sleek wood-and-steel digs sprawling across 42,800 square feet, a dining area with outdoor seating, a new menu created by Portland chef Sarah Schafer, an augmented ice cream counter serving up Tillamook flavors, a new coffee and yogurt bar, a shop, and most importantly, an upgraded perspective on the production and packaging operations. Take a look at how the cheese gets made, spend a little time with the farm exhibit and learn about the cows (and technology) behind the dairy-making magic, and taste as many samples as you can handle. Try the cheese curds before you leave—this is the only place you’ll find ‘em. The creamery is open daily for free self-guided from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., early November to mid-June, and 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. the rest of the year. tillamook.com 10. The Great American Popcorn Company, Galena, Illinois The family-owned Great American Popcorn company produces over 150 flavors of popcorn, from sweet options like caramel pecan and cinnamon toast, to savory flavors like jalapeno pepper and zesty ranch, all made with non-GMO corn. As you’d imagine, the facility, a simple storefront located downtown Galena, a quaint small town about 160 miles west of Chicago, is a far cry from the movie theater concession counter. Sensory overload awaits as you at the compact shop, where you can watch the makers at work at the cooking and coating machines then fill wood barrel after wood barrel of the stuff. And yes, they'll give you fresh, warm samples of whatever flavor they're making. A visit here also provides a history lesson in the snack food and a scientific tutorial in how it pops. Don’t leave before you gather some treats to bring home. About 30 flavors are sold at the gift shop on any given day. The popcorn is made in the store, which is open 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday. greatpopcorn.com

Budget Travel Lists

Cocktails at Your Service: 8 Hotels With Amazing Mini-Bars

It’s gotten oh-so much easier to get a good drink at a hotel bar these days, but your in-room mini-bar? At most hotels, you’re lucky if you get a ho-hum tonic or soda to mix with a work-a-day spirit of (limited) choice. And garnish? Well, maybe that Lifesaver at the bottom of your travel bag will do the trick. You deserve better. After a long day of traveling when all you want to do is kick back and relax with a nice cocktail—preferably in your PJs—these eight hotels are willing to let you shake things up right in the privacy of your own room. Put out the Do-Not-Disturb sign and check in to one of these thirst-quenching spots. 1. The Darcy: Washington, DC The Darcy in the nation’s capitol is shaking things up by bringing the bar to you via their outstanding Cocktail Butler program. (Think: room service for booze!) A well-trained in-house mixologist will arrive at your door with a thoroughly stocked bar cart and build you a beautiful drink right in your own room, be it their signature Ten Thyme Smash (fresh thyme, cucumber, and lime juice shaken with Tanqueray 10 gin, simple syrup, and white cranberry) or whatever your drink of choice may be. Garnish? Proper glassware? Check and check. They’ll even customize the cart to your preferences when they take your reservation. 2. The Langham: New York, NY Give a person a fish, and she’ll eat for a day. But give her a good cocktail kit, and she’ll be mixing up drinks each night of her stay. At New York’s five-star Langham in Midtown, guest room mini-bars come equipped with their Mini Craft Cocktail Set, which has a trio of pre-mixed classics (the Old Fashioned, the Moscow Mule, and their Spicy Margarita). And if you want to bring the party on the plane when you leave, the Langham’s Carry-On Cocktail Kit includes the fixings for a pink Champagne Cocktail with their house Laurent Perrier Champagne in single-serve carry-on size—the perfect way to toast a great vacay. 3. The Four Seasons: Austin, TX Don’t mess with Texas and its love of Margaritas. At the Four Seasons in Austin, they’re happy to mix them for you. In May 2018, this outpost of the luxury hotel chain began offering a daily Happy Hour On-Demand Margarita Cart, accessed by its very own button on each room’s phone. From 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., you can call for a bartender to arrive at your door, pushing a bar cart teeming with premium tequilas (including Four Seasons’ own custom Herradura blend) and myriad salts for rimming. Choose from any one of up to 500 combinations of up, on the rocks, or blended versions of the popular classic. 4. The Cape: Los Cabos, Mexico At the end of California’s Baja Peninsula sits the Cape, a swanky, beachside hotel that’s part of the Thompson Hotel collective. Here, each guestroom comes equipped with a custom, hand-etched crystal bottle of Realeza Mexicana, a 100% blue agave tequila produced exclusively for the hotel, and each day it’s stocked alongside with fresh orange slices and the traditional Cabo go-with, candied mangos with chili powder—a pretty apropos cocktail to savor while you sit on your room’s deck and watch the sun go down. 5. The Keeting Hotel: San Diego, CA Be sure to reserve the Macallan Suite at the Keating Hotel (designed by the makers of Ferrari and Maserati, don’t you know?) on your next trek to sunny San Diego. Here, you room will not only come with full bottles of vintage Macallan single malt Scotch and locally brewed beers, but also an in-room cocktail-crafting kit and an ample selection of spirits with which to employ it. Bonus: The gleaming copper Morpheus Jacuzzi tub makes a pretty swell spot to sip and chill. 6. The Four Seasons Hotel: Orlando, FL Sometimes, you just want a glass of wine. Or maybe two. At the Orlando Four Seasons, not only can you choose how much you want without leftovers to contend with, but you can grape-hop a little, too. Ask for a room (there are around 100 available) that contains one of their Plum Wine units. Each one holds a perfect cellar-temperature red (Etude Lyric pinot noir) and white (a stellar Stag’s Leap chardonnay) from which to choose and will dispense single five-ounce pours while preserving the bottle inside. 7. Kimpton Aerston Hotel: Nashville, TN Since it opened in Spring 2017, the Kimpton Aerston has separated itself from other Music City hotels with its whiskey selections, one of the largest in town. It’s not, however, sequestered to the bar at the on-site Henley Restaurant. Not only is Henley’s full cocktail list available for in-room sipping, but they also offer an “Whiskey + Bourbon” package, which includes house-made whiskey-spiked nibbles that await you in your room upon arrival, two complimentary rocks glasses stamped with the logo of local craft whiskey distillery, Nelson’s Green Brier, the fixings to make the whiskey-centric cocktails of your choice from their excellent cocktail menu (perhaps a Briar Patch, with Elijah Craig bourbon, creme Yvette, fresh lemon juice, and simple syrup, all measured and ready to stir), and, when you’re ready to step out, a private tour and tasting at Nelson’s Green Brier, as well as an extra 20 percent off at Henley. 8. Mr. C: Beverly Hills, CA Leave it to the next generation of Italian hospitality icons, the Cipriani family, to stock every room of their glamorous Beverly Hills hideaway with a stash of bottled cocktails, six in total. Choose from a classic gin Martini, 1934 Cosmo, Ginger Buck, Manhattan, Negroni, or an Old Fashioned, all crafted by mixologist Nathan Oliver for the clever to-go cocktail company, BTL SVC, founded by Michael Baruch. But these are no pre-fab flops—each one offers stellar spirits and ingredients, like the decidedly grown-up vodka-based Cosmo, with dry curacao, raspberry gomme syrup, fresh lime juice, and aromatic citrus oil. And just in case you want to tuck some in your travel case on the way out, they sell them in the lobby, too. (Individual serves are $15 per cocktail, and the box of 5 individually handcrafted bottles is $110).