Travel News: TSA Staffing Woes, Kayak Gives Diners a New Reason to Hit the Road, and Eurail Reaches a Milestone

Security lines airport DenverSecurity lines at airport
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There’s a great big world out there, and our latest “news you can use” may inspire a trip you never knew you needed.

From the latest on how the government shutdown is affecting the airport experience to Eurail’s 60th anniversary celebration, plus a new way to use your OpenTable rewards points, this week’s travel news has you covered.

TSA Worker Absences On the Rise

As the government shutdown rolls on, airports continue to struggle with staffing and security concerns. The Transportation Security Administration announced today that “many employees are reporting that they are not able to report to work due to financial limitations”—not surprising, given that they’re going on 27 days without pay. The TSA released data for Wednesday travel showing that unscheduled worker absences were up 22% from the same date last year, and the agency tells The Washington Post that the trend will only continue. “The number of people calling out because of financial concerns is increasing,” Michael Bilello, TSA’s assistant administrator for public affairs, told the paper. “As we go further and further away from having a missed paycheck and going into unknowns...people will have to make a decision: ‘Can I afford to go to work today?’”

Air traffic controllers are facing the same financial strain, and with a federal judge denying a request by the air controllers’ union, among others, that aimed to force the government to pay them during the shutdown, the situation doesn’t look likely to improve. Though there were reports earlier in the week of wait times stretching to two and three hours in some locations, the TSA says that national averages are on par with the usual standards. Wednesday’s max was only 39 minutes at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport—the country’s busiest. But with major events like the Women’s March and Super Bowl on the horizon, it remains to be seen just how our nation’s transportation organizations will respond to the heavy crowds that are expected with limited personnel.

Kayak's New Dining Deal

As of today, OpenTable devotees have a fresh way to earn rewards. The dining-reservations platform is teaming with booking site Kayak to allow its users to put their hard-earned loyalty points toward hotel stays, both at home and abroad. U.S. diners with 2,000 points or more can now receive discounts of up to $200 at some 400,000 participating hotels, the first in a series of new redemption options the two platforms’ parent company plans to roll out in the coming days. “OpenTable diners are avid travelers, so we are excited to offer a Dining Reward that will help them save on their next trip,” said Kayak CEO Steve Hafner. “Creating shared value for our respective users—diners that love to travel and travelers that need to eat—is a priority.” (opentable.com)

Eurail's 60th Anniversary

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, airplanes are a modern miracle. (If only Christopher Columbus knew how long it takes us to travel the distance he covered in a lifetime!) But for travelers with more wanderlust and the luxury of time, railroads are the way to go, and with Eurail, a network of dozens of train systems—including high-speed, international, and smaller regional lines—in 31 different countries throughout the continent, you can design a European vacation for the ages. Eurail offers unparalleled flexibility and an extensive menu of travel packages that lets you make your decision based on factors like the length of time of your trip, seating preferences, and more. And on the occasion of its 60th anniversary, the company is proving that it's only getting better with age. Its roster includes three new destinations—Macedonia, Lithuania, and Great Britain—and five new carriers that will give travelers even more route options. As an added bonus, they've introduced new lower prices on Global and One Country passes as well as passes for seniors (60 years and older) and youth (under 27 years), and they're now offering a 2nd Class option too, making it possible to see more of Europe for less in 2019. (eurail.com)

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